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AUXLANG  August 2019, Week 3

AUXLANG August 2019, Week 3

Subject:

Re: Globasa: a New World Creole

From:

Kjell Rehnström <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

International Auxiliary Languages <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 16 Aug 2019 06:53:29 +0200

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Tam longe quam noi deve aprender altri grand westi lingues li auxilingue 
posse contener partes grammatical quel es possibil in un westi lingue.
     Yo ha nequande observat que slavic parlatores de esperanto haye 
problemas con verbes quel in lor lingues postula li anstrumentalis o 
altri casus. Apu Zamenhof on sovente vide li construction "helpi al iu" 
ma in modern esperanto yo vide "helpi iun".
     Un notandum es que yo ha videt pejorativ sufixes ma ne melioratives 
in auxilingues!

den 2019-08-15 21:01, skrev Brian Mansberger:
> I happen to disagree with something, so I wanted to mention it.
>
> Quote:
> ================
> /I think that one should be suspicious of anything in an auxlang that 
> isn’t a feature found in natural languages, no matter how logical it 
> seems. It may seem at first sight that such a system (class-less words 
> where part of speech is marked with vowel endings) is best because 
> it’s more logical. For some people, maybe, but probably not for the 
> average world citizen, who is much more intuitive with regards to 
> language than perhaps the average language enthusiasts. /
>
> /In Globasa, I’ve reduced the burden of learning the part of speech of 
> words by having only two (noun/verb and adj-adv/verb). So yes, 
> sometimes a root word in Globasa will be an adjective while it’s a 
> noun in your native language’s root word. From experience, I would say 
> this isn’t problematic. First, because most content words are 
> naturally and universally either descriptive (adj/adv) or substantive 
> (noun/verb). You’d have a hard time, for example, finding a language 
> where the root word for “tall” is actually a noun, with the adjective 
> being a derived word. Or where the root word for “elephant” is an 
> adjective./
> ================
>
> I think it is true that an auxlang is well-informed by studying 
> natural forms in natural languages, but I disagree that there isn't 
> room to make language processing easier in a way that is rare among 
> natural languages, specifically by marking parts of speech.  Risto is 
> on the right track here (just my opinion), when he says that people 
> will be coming from different language traditions and are thus aided 
> by hearing and seeing visible clues about how they can use a word.  
> This becomes more important when you start mixing categories that are 
> very often separated in the natural language world (like mixing nouns 
> and verbs very thoroughly.)  In many natural languages, there are 
> specific patterns associated with certain nouns, verb-nouns or activities:
>
> (rough approximation)
>
> English:  I need <something>
> Russian:  To me is needed <something>
> Welsh:  Is need with me <something>
>
> In these other languages the idea of "need" is an impersonal state, 
> not something that someone does (one of the confusions that can occur 
> when shifting to a strict SVO language where it seems that every 
> subject is "doing" something.)
>
> If Globasa uses "need" as in English (SVO), the person may interpret 
> such sentences as:
> "I am made to need <something>" (possible agent confusion)
> "I am making need <something>" (possible transitive confusion)
> because the idea of someone doing or personally initiating "need" from 
> a SVO structure will seem very strange, *especially* for people coming 
> from an ergative/absolutive language (parts of the Middle East, the 
> Caucasus, indigenous American languages, Tibetan plateau, Australia, 
> New Guinea).
>
> Since Globasa verbs are nouns and vice versa, many folk will instead 
> probably construct things like:
> It needs to me
> With me is need
> It needs with me
> Need is to me
> Need me <something>
>
> "To haja cel mi kitabu"
> "Kitabu haja cel mi"
> "Haja cel mi kitabu"
> "Haja kitabu cel mi"
>
> Hearing that will seem very strange to many people.  Additionally, 
> there are wide disparities in how languages handle certain concepts.  
> Even neighboring French has "It has a good taste" instead of "It 
> tastes good."  Constructing that phrase in Globasa would be "To hare 
> bono..." and then that person is going to pause while they think, hmm, 
> do I choose:  xeto (sense), xetoya (sense of) or xetocu (have a 
> taste)?  Since "xeto" means "taste-sensing", they may think, hmm, well 
> that seems ok, thus:  To hare bono xeto ("It has good taste-sense") or 
> To hare xeto bono ("It well has taste-sense" with adverb following all 
> objects) from their perspective, or maybe they will opt for:  To hare 
> bono xetocu ("It has good taste-having") but both of these differ 
> strongly with the Germanic structure insinuated by the dictionary, 
> where the subject somehow "inflicts" or taste-has:  (I'm assuming the 
> correct sentence is: To bono xetocu)  This will also seem strange to 
> (example) Russians who simply have "It tasty."
>
> Aside:  How do we know if "To hare xeto bono" is "It (well) has 
> taste-sense" with the adverb after all objects (as the grammar says is 
> permitted), or "It has taste-sense being-good"?  Is the correct 
> sentence "To bono xetocu" (It good taste-having) or since all verbs 
> are nouns, "Bono xetocu" (Good taste-having) or "Xetocu bono" 
> (Taste-have is-good)?  These seem permissable but there is a lot of 
> variation.
>
> While people may very well understand such constructions after taking 
> a few seconds to parse something from a different tradition, it is a 
> missed opportunity:  what if the speaker had spoken in standard form?  
> It would have been another repetition of the fundamentals of the 
> language, thus another valuable learning encounter that would boost 
> learning the language.  These encounters are *tremendously* valuable 
> in conlangs because they are not reinforced over and over and over 
> again as with natural languages -- no, instead they are met in a two 
> hour chance meeting in a noisy bar or meeting area where time is 
> limited, and you don't get to speak it again for another week.
>
> Regarding need: since you aren't marking "need" or other items in an 
> obvious way, these people are going to come in and interpret the verb 
> according to their tradition and since there is nothing visible 
> showing them the standard usage, it will become *more* troublesome for 
> them to remember.  I also personally find that when learning a 
> language, I will gladly take any visible clues to help me learn the 
> new tradition.  By not marking your words, those clues don't exist.  
> The problem is not being forced into a thought pattern, but the 
> inverse -- not being guided.  The only reason people know how to build 
> "need" meanings in their natural languages is because they have 
> constant repetition of a construct.  This is the item that conlangs 
> lack greatly.
>
> In Proyo, need is listed as "nide" - a subject patient focus 
> (transitive) verb, with strict SVO structure.  Since an impersonal 
> "it" can't experience something, we have good clues that the 
> appropriate sentence is:
>
> "Mi nide (un/la/<null>) libro"
>
> If you try "Libro nide al mi" you've broken the natural transitive 
> pattern for that verb, it's not permitted.  And if you are using "it" 
> referring to something like food:  "Lo nide <some salt>"  You know the 
> verb defines a precise experience for the subject.
>
> In Globasa: to break is listed as "goje" -- is this transitive, 
> intransitive, or ambitransitive?  If it is ambitransitive, I hope you 
> realize that unchanging ambitransitive state change verbs are quite 
> Anglo-centric and relatively rare among the world languages, thus it 
> will be a new tradition for many people.  Many Romance languages 
> handle these with pronominal structures "se rompe" etc. Or 'to finish' 
> -- (Russian: It finish-self, He finish it) because they are trying to 
> show a lack of agency that is sometimes hard or not intuitive with SVO 
> structures.
>
> If you have an ambitransitive "goje" -- how do you know if "dugoje" is 
> something breaking, or breaking something else?  You could probably 
> assume that without an object it is subject-patient, but this will 
> also take a few nanoseconds of valuable parse time for the listener 
> and reader.  Is "gojeyen" someone who breaks or breaks other things?  
> It looks like, indeed, you have goje as ambitransitive because broken 
> is "gojedo." However, you have fear as "fobi" and afraid "fobipul" and 
> scared "fobigido".  This insinuates an inherent transitive use for 
> this verb.  Why would one assume that to break would be magically 
> different from to fear?  This is perhaps subconscious Anglo patterns 
> carrying through.  Perhaps a learner would think that the verb has a 
> natural intransitive use and thus opt for "I fear of him" and "I fear 
> him" would follow the example of "goje" and become transitive to the 
> object, thus "fobido" would be "scared."
>
> Perhaps most people don't care about nouns, verbs and grammar, but 
> they will still be memorizing the vocabulary.  How nice if a little 
> useful information could be encoded into what they have to memorize?  
> Over time the obvious clues will become instinctual. In an obvious 
> system, we don't even need to teach advanced grammar -- the learner 
> will absorb it passively.
>
> I do think the visible parts of speech have aided Esperanto in the end 
> because, in reality, most people read more of it than they speak it, 
> and the endings are useful clues to help interpret what they read.  
> Any bit of reinforcement or help is good.
>
> I agree however, that having formless roots where the vowel changes is 
> not ideal.  Here are three problems with "flapping vowels":
>
> 1)  It is hard to hear the difference (in practice, most final vowels 
> very often get reduced to schwa or strongly de-emphasized), which 
> means it requires extra thinking or processing, which slows 
> cognition.  I experience this in many Esperanto conversations -- you 
> hear a word and you take a second to parse it because you didn't hear 
> the last vowel or the person used the word in an unconventional way, 
> so you fill it in with your intuition.
>
> 2)  It encourages strange usages rather than enforcing standard usages 
> -- encouraging "strange" (i.e. anything less frequent) usages is great 
> for flexibility but makes things slower to learn. Enforcing a standard 
> usage makes the language faster and easier to learn.
>
> 3)  The repetitive force that helps us learn is diminished because you 
> always have to think about your root and what vowel to attach.  I 
> suspect it may be speedier and easier to have the word mean solidly 
> one thing and then build your affixes after for variant meanings.  
> Most of the time, your roots will be used in one predominant way, 
> which aids learning, listening and sentence formulation.
>
> It is with these premises that I have constructed (and continue to) 
> construct Proyo with very strict visible roots that never change form 
> despite affixation.  Proyo is really more of a thought exercise to 
> "hammer home" linguistic concepts by repetition (repetition is so 
> valuable and underappreciated with auxlangs, we need every valuable 
> moment we can get), and I am still exploring methods to increase its 
> obviousness -- and I would willingly drop the project if another 
> project had similar notions.  I have come to see the final vowel 
> "flapping" as a problematic feature but this is seemingly a very 
> popular feature in conlangs.  I also do not mean to say that it cannot 
> work -- it's just that it slows things down.
>
> I also do not mean to say that Proyo is without criticism; it has 
> flaws, I have been working more on theory and trying to be clear 
> rather than word selection.  I also do not mean to say that I have any 
> special corner on truth or that Globasa, Pandunia or anything else are 
> bad (they're not -- they are great acts of love and creation and 
> deserve our respect.)  I am mostly writing because I firmly believe 
> there are good ways to encode meaning into vocabulary that provide 
> easy benefits.
>
> Also, since people always seem to care very much about 
> <insert>-centrism and how to best select world morphemes (despite 
> there being no perfect or good way to do this; it is just a multiyear 
> argument thread) I have started thinking of constructing an a priori 
> language with items inspired from Proyo. I would love to collaborate 
> with someone on such a thing who cares about visible semantics and 
> ease of learning.
>
> Thanks,
> Brian
> *Proyo:* https://sites.google.com/view/proyo-auxlang
>
> ---
>
> Sent from Berlin-based email provider *Posteo.de*
> *Green, Secure, Ad-Free*
> To learn more about Posteo, visit: https://posteo.de/en/site/about_posteo
>
>
> On 14.08.2019 23:06, Hector Ortega wrote:
>
>> Hi Risto,
>>
>> Risto: "Pandunia doesn't need many affixes because it has a productive system of word derivation.
>> For example, in Pandunia, the word for democracy is "demokratia". It is made up of two roots, dem- (people, the public) and krat- (governance), and two affixes: -o- (the linker for compound words) and -ia.
>>
>> dem-o-krat-ia
>>
>> Globasa is unable to combine words simply, so you use truncated morphemes. So Globasa word "demokras" is made up of "demo" and "kras", which is truncated from "krasi"."
>>
>> Hector: But see, that's just it. I think "demokras", with two morphemes is easier for an adult learner to process than two root words and two suffixes. So Globasa actually does combine morphemes more simply. It doesn't have to deal with endings, the way Esperanto and Pandunia do. Yes, it has many more affixes (which as easy to learn, see below) than Pandunia, but the result is two-fold: more words are generated, and more simply.
>>
>> See full list, with examples:https://www.globasa.net/word-formation
>>
>> Pandunia: heterosexual - alojinsokami (al-o-jins-o-kam-i) That's six morphemes.
>>   
>> Globasa: heterosexual - alterjensimey (alter-jensi-mey) That's three morphemes.
>>
>> Globasa can combine an adjective and a noun, as seen with alter- (other/different), but it doesn't create compounds by just combining two nouns, the way English does. Instead it does something similar to Pandunia's system, but again, slightly more simply. The first word uses the adjective suffix -li:
>>
>> rukeli bao – backpack
>>
>> In Pandunia, you have to change -e, if the word has it, to -o, and then attach the second noun:
>>
>> ruke – back: rukosake – backpack
>>
>> The "noun-li noun" compound in Globasa is somewhat easier to process than Pandunia's because there's never a need to drop anything prior to adding -li and because the words are split up. Most word formation is done through affixing though, as seen above, rather than though this type of compounding, for the simple reason that the most common word-formation morphemes are affixes in Globasa.
>> Yes, most affixes are shorter morphemes than their counterparts, and there isn't a consistent way in which they are truncated. I don't feel this is a problem, however. The system was inspired by the book The Unfolding of Language: An Evolutionary Tour of Mankind's Greatest Invention by Guy Deutscher. Again, the full response is here:
>>
>> https://www.globasa.net/truncated-words
>>
>> To summarize, Globasa's affixes, like Esperanto's must be memorized as independent morphemes. The suffix -eg- and the word "granda" are separate morphemes. Likewise with Globasa's "day-" (-eg-) and "dayo" (granda). They aren't necessarily "truncated" in a predictable way, true, but that doesn't take away the fact that they are still easy to learn through association with their counterpart nouns and adjectives.
>>
>> Risto: "In my opinion a schematic system of final vowels is better than a random system of truncation."
>>
>> Hector: I disagree. The system of affixes is simpler to process, as seen above. All in all, it's simpler than that of Pandunia and that of Esperanto. The system is similar to that Turkish where root words always retain their form. The burden of learning the affixes is also counterbalanced by the fact that it's a more productive system for generating words.
>>
>> For example, in Globasa we have "pesapul" (rich) and "pesakal" (poor). Pandunia adds two roots to the dictionary: rici and miskin. Pandunia uses the root "wiman" (airplane) where Globasa uses the affixed word "hawnavi" (aero-ship). Those are just three examples, but perhaps I could do a study and see how many more affixed words are generated in Globasa where Pandunia uses a root word.
>>
>> "Hector: It's a simpler language more akin to creoles.
>>
>> Risto: I'm not so sure about that. Creoles have impoverished morphology and that makes them seem simple on the surface, but their grammars are not so simple on some other levels. I think it's a problem in Globasa too."
>>
>> Hector: Creoles have impoverished morphology? Perhaps pidgins do. I think pidgins do pose a problem because they are too simple, as you suggest. On the other hand, I'd say creoles are some of the easiest languages. I think Globasa is potentially easier than creoles because it has a more consistent system of affixes. Can you give examples of Globasa's impoverished morphology? Let's not get sidetracked, whether or not some creoles have impoverished morphology is not the point. It's Globasa we're discussing, and Globasa is similar, but not identical to creoles.
>> Risto: "For example, Globasa words seems to have inherent word-classes **that you just have to remember**. So you have to know that word A is an adjective and you need to use suffix X to turn it into a noun. And you have to remember that word B is a noun and you need to use suffix Y to turn it into an adjective. So basically every word belongs to a word class somehow magically?
>>
>> That's a damn complex system that burdens your memory a lot! Especially if in your native language A is more like a verb and B is more like a noun...
>>
>> In Pandunia most roots are classless (except conjunctions, numerals and prepositions, but fortunately they are closed word classes). From a simple foundation it's easy to build a language that stays simple all the way up!"
>>
>> Hector: Yes, every content word in Globasa is either a noun or an adjective. Both nouns and adjectives are used as verbs. So essentially it's just two word classes. The system of endings in Pandunia to mark part of speech, similar to Esperanto's, is problematic for a number of reason.
>> Essentially, I think what you're not understanding, Risto, is that not everybody processes language in a way that is as logical as the way perhaps you and I (or maybe even most people in the Auxlang community) process language. The average person processes language much more intuitively than logically. This is what my personal, professional experience as a language instructor tells me. If the average human being were a logical machine then Pandunia would probably work better than Globasa.
>>
>> I think that one should be suspicious of anything in an auxlang that isn't a feature found in natural languages, no matter how logical it seems. It may seem at first sight that such a system (class-less words where part of speech is marked with vowel endings) is best because it's more logical. For some people, maybe, but probably not for the average world citizen, who is much more intuitive with regards to language than perhaps the average language enthusiasts.
>>
>> In Globasa, I've reduced the burden of learning the part of speech of words by having only two (noun/verb and adj-adv/verb). So yes, sometimes a root word in Globasa will be an adjective while it's a noun in your native language's root word. From experience, I would say this isn't problematic. First, because most content words are naturally and universally either descriptive (adj/adv) or substantive (noun/verb). You'd have a hard time, for example, finding a language where the root word for "tall" is actually a noun, with the adjective being a derived word. Or where the root word for "elephant" is an adjective.
>>
>> With regards to those words that do differ in one's native language (for example, in Globasa it's "sofi" for wisdom and "sofipul" for wise, but "wise" in English is the root) a lot has to do with how words are taught, through syntactic and semantic context for example, through which a learner would easily assimilate "sofipul" as meaning "wise". This isn't as problematic as you make it out to seem.
>>
>> The system of part of speech endings, on the other hand, is more problematic. It is potentially confusing because the difference is minimal between the words: X-a, X-e, X-i, X-o, X-u. It requires more processing at a faster rate. In Globasa, one is better able to acclimate the ear to the difference between a noun/verb and an adj/adv because it's always the difference of a whole syllable.
>>
>> "Hector: There are other details that set them apart. For example, in Globasa I've avoided similar-sounding words as best as possible. Pandunia doesn't make an effort to avoid such minimal pairs. Pandunia also tends to use monosyllabic content words whereas Globasa avoids them, as best as possible, other than for function words.
>>
>> Risto: "Pandunia uses a final vowel system similar to Esperanto for building words, so consequently the length of Pandunia roots is one vowel shorter than what they otherwise could be. However, I haven't ever heard anyone complaining that words sound too similar to one another in Esperanto, which uses a similar system. So why would it be a significant problem in Pandunia, then?"
>>
>> Hector: One doesn't always "hear anyone complaining". It's sometimes a matter of paying attention and seeing where learners get stuck. The immigrants that our tutors and I work with don't come to us and say, "Oh my God, those phrasal verbs are horribly confusing..." Instead we notice them struggle with them. Minimal pairs *are* potentially difficult even if learners don't tell you. You'd be surprised how often context doesn't entirely eliminate the confusion. Furthermore, not everybody can hear as well as you and I. At some point, people gradually start to lose their hearing. Some environments are noisy too. I don't think it's a bad idea to try to avoid minimal pairs in an auxlang.
>>
>> All in all, I feel that Globasa is better equipped as a language that would be used in the real world, in actual fluent speech. If one is interested in a language that'll only be used in written communication then Globasa might not have much of an advantage over Pandunia. What I'm personally interested in is a full-fledged spoken language, and I think others might be too.
>>
>> Kind regards,
>>
>> Hector

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March 2014, Week 3
March 2014, Week 2
March 2014, Week 1
February 2014, Week 4
February 2014, Week 3
February 2014, Week 2
February 2014, Week 1
January 2014, Week 5
January 2014, Week 4
January 2014, Week 3
January 2014, Week 1
December 2013, Week 5
December 2013, Week 4
December 2013, Week 3
December 2013, Week 2
December 2013, Week 1
November 2013, Week 5
November 2013, Week 4
November 2013, Week 3
November 2013, Week 2
November 2013, Week 1
October 2013, Week 5
October 2013, Week 4
October 2013, Week 3
October 2013, Week 2
October 2013, Week 1
September 2013, Week 3
August 2013, Week 4
August 2013, Week 3
August 2013, Week 2
July 2013, Week 2
July 2013, Week 1
June 2013, Week 5
June 2013, Week 4
June 2013, Week 3
June 2013, Week 2
May 2013, Week 5
May 2013, Week 3
May 2013, Week 2
May 2013, Week 1
April 2013, Week 5
April 2013, Week 4
April 2013, Week 3
April 2013, Week 2
April 2013, Week 1
March 2013, Week 5
March 2013, Week 4
March 2013, Week 3
March 2013, Week 2
March 2013, Week 1
February 2013, Week 4
February 2013, Week 3
February 2013, Week 2
February 2013, Week 1
January 2013, Week 4
January 2013, Week 3
January 2013, Week 2
January 2013, Week 1
December 2012, Week 5
December 2012, Week 4
December 2012, Week 3
December 2012, Week 2
December 2012, Week 1
November 2012, Week 4
November 2012, Week 3
November 2012, Week 2
November 2012, Week 1
October 2012, Week 5
October 2012, Week 4
October 2012, Week 3
October 2012, Week 2
October 2012, Week 1
September 2012, Week 5
September 2012, Week 4
September 2012, Week 3
September 2012, Week 2
September 2012, Week 1
August 2012, Week 4
August 2012, Week 2
August 2012, Week 1
July 2012, Week 5
July 2012, Week 4
July 2012, Week 3
July 2012, Week 2
July 2012, Week 1
June 2012, Week 5
June 2012, Week 4
June 2012, Week 3
June 2012, Week 1
May 2012, Week 5
May 2012, Week 4
May 2012, Week 3
May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 5
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 4
December 2011, Week 5
December 2011, Week 4
December 2011, Week 3
December 2011, Week 2
December 2011, Week 1
November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
October 2011, Week 5
October 2011, Week 4
October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
August 2011, Week 5
August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 5
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 4
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 5
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007, Week 5
December 2007, Week 4
December 2007, Week 3
December 2007, Week 2
December 2007, Week 1
November 2007, Week 5
November 2007, Week 4
November 2007, Week 3
November 2007, Week 2
November 2007, Week 1
October 2007, Week 5
October 2007, Week 4
October 2007, Week 3
October 2007, Week 2
October 2007, Week 1
September 2007, Week 5
September 2007, Week 4
September 2007, Week 3
September 2007, Week 2
September 2007, Week 1
August 2007, Week 5
August 2007, Week 4
August 2007, Week 3
August 2007, Week 2
August 2007, Week 1
July 2007, Week 5
July 2007, Week 4
July 2007, Week 3
July 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 1
June 2007, Week 5
June 2007, Week 4
June 2007, Week 3
June 2007, Week 2
June 2007, Week 1
May 2007, Week 5
May 2007, Week 4
May 2007, Week 3
May 2007, Week 2
May 2007, Week 1
April 2007, Week 5
April 2007, Week 4
April 2007, Week 3
April 2007, Week 2
April 2007, Week 1
March 2007, Week 5
March 2007, Week 4
March 2007, Week 3
March 2007, Week 2
March 2007, Week 1
February 2007, Week 4
February 2007, Week 3
February 2007, Week 2
February 2007, Week 1
January 2007, Week 5
January 2007, Week 4
January 2007, Week 3
January 2007, Week 2
January 2007, Week 1
December 2006, Week 5
December 2006, Week 4
December 2006, Week 3
December 2006, Week 2
December 2006, Week 1
November 2006, Week 5
November 2006, Week 4
November 2006, Week 3
November 2006, Week 2
November 2006, Week 1
October 2006, Week 5
October 2006, Week 4
October 2006, Week 3
October 2006, Week 2
October 2006, Week 1
September 2006, Week 5
September 2006, Week 4
September 2006, Week 3
September 2006, Week 2
September 2006, Week 1
August 2006, Week 5
August 2006, Week 4
August 2006, Week 3
August 2006, Week 2
August 2006, Week 1
July 2006, Week 5
July 2006, Week 4
July 2006, Week 3
July 2006, Week 2
July 2006, Week 1
June 2006, Week 5
June 2006, Week 4
June 2006, Week 3
June 2006, Week 2
June 2006, Week 1
May 2006, Week 5
May 2006, Week 4
May 2006, Week 3
May 2006, Week 2
May 2006, Week 1
April 2006, Week 5
April 2006, Week 4
April 2006, Week 3
April 2006, Week 2
April 2006, Week 1
March 2006, Week 5
March 2006, Week 4
March 2006, Week 3
March 2006, Week 2
March 2006, Week 1
February 2006, Week 4
February 2006, Week 3
February 2006, Week 2
February 2006, Week 1
January 2006, Week 5
January 2006, Week 4
January 2006, Week 3
January 2006, Week 2
January 2006, Week 1
December 2005, Week 5
December 2005, Week 4
December 2005, Week 3
December 2005, Week 2
December 2005, Week 1
November 2005, Week 5
November 2005, Week 4
November 2005, Week 3
November 2005, Week 2
November 2005, Week 1
October 2005, Week 5
October 2005, Week 4
October 2005, Week 3
October 2005, Week 2
October 2005, Week 1
September 2005, Week 5
September 2005, Week 4
September 2005, Week 3
September 2005, Week 2
September 2005, Week 1
August 2005, Week 5
August 2005, Week 4
August 2005, Week 3
August 2005, Week 2
August 2005, Week 1
July 2005, Week 5
July 2005, Week 4
July 2005, Week 3
July 2005, Week 2
July 2005, Week 1
June 2005, Week 5
June 2005, Week 4
June 2005, Week 3
June 2005, Week 2
June 2005, Week 1
May 2005, Week 5
May 2005, Week 4
May 2005, Week 3
May 2005, Week 2
May 2005, Week 1
April 2005, Week 5
April 2005, Week 4
April 2005, Week 3
April 2005, Week 2
April 2005, Week 1
March 2005, Week 5
March 2005, Week 4
March 2005, Week 3
March 2005, Week 2
March 2005, Week 1
February 2005, Week 4
February 2005, Week 3
February 2005, Week 2
February 2005, Week 1
January 2005, Week 5
January 2005, Week 4
January 2005, Week 3
January 2005, Week 2
January 2005, Week 1
December 2004, Week 5
December 2004, Week 4
December 2004, Week 3
December 2004, Week 2
December 2004, Week 1
November 2004, Week 5
November 2004, Week 4
November 2004, Week 3
November 2004, Week 2
November 2004, Week 1
October 2004, Week 5
October 2004, Week 4
October 2004, Week 3
October 2004, Week 2
October 2004, Week 1
September 2004, Week 5
September 2004, Week 4
September 2004, Week 3
September 2004, Week 2
September 2004, Week 1
August 2004, Week 5
August 2004, Week 4
August 2004, Week 3
August 2004, Week 2
August 2004, Week 1
July 2004, Week 5
July 2004, Week 4
July 2004, Week 3
July 2004, Week 2
July 2004, Week 1
June 2004, Week 5
June 2004, Week 4
June 2004, Week 3
June 2004, Week 2
June 2004, Week 1
May 2004, Week 5
May 2004, Week 4
May 2004, Week 3
May 2004, Week 2
May 2004, Week 1
April 2004, Week 5
April 2004, Week 4
April 2004, Week 3
April 2004, Week 2
April 2004, Week 1
March 2004, Week 5
March 2004, Week 4
March 2004, Week 3
March 2004, Week 2
March 2004, Week 1
February 2004, Week 5
February 2004, Week 4
February 2004, Week 3
February 2004, Week 2
February 2004, Week 1
January 2004, Week 5
January 2004, Week 4
January 2004, Week 3
January 2004, Week 2
January 2004, Week 1
December 2003, Week 5
December 2003, Week 4
December 2003, Week 3
December 2003, Week 2
December 2003, Week 1
November 2003, Week 5
November 2003, Week 4
November 2003, Week 3
November 2003, Week 2
November 2003, Week 1
October 2003, Week 5
October 2003, Week 4
October 2003, Week 3
October 2003, Week 2
October 2003, Week 1
September 2003, Week 5
September 2003, Week 4
September 2003, Week 3
September 2003, Week 2
September 2003, Week 1
August 2003, Week 5
August 2003, Week 4
August 2003, Week 3
August 2003, Week 2
August 2003, Week 1
July 2003, Week 5
July 2003, Week 4
July 2003, Week 3
July 2003, Week 2
July 2003, Week 1
June 2003, Week 5
June 2003, Week 4
June 2003, Week 3
June 2003, Week 2
June 2003, Week 1
May 2003, Week 5
May 2003, Week 4
May 2003, Week 3
May 2003, Week 2
May 2003, Week 1
April 2003, Week 5
April 2003, Week 4
April 2003, Week 3
April 2003, Week 2
March 2003, Week 5
March 2003, Week 4
March 2003, Week 3
March 2003, Week 2
March 2003, Week 1
February 2003, Week 4
February 2003, Week 3
February 2003, Week 2
February 2003, Week 1
January 2003, Week 5
January 2003, Week 4
January 2003, Week 3
January 2003, Week 2
January 2003, Week 1
December 2002, Week 5
December 2002, Week 4
December 2002, Week 3
December 2002, Week 2
December 2002, Week 1
November 2002, Week 4
November 2002, Week 3
November 2002, Week 2
November 2002, Week 1
October 2002, Week 5
October 2002, Week 4
October 2002, Week 3
October 2002, Week 2
October 2002, Week 1
September 2002, Week 5
September 2002, Week 4
September 2002, Week 3
September 2002, Week 2
September 2002, Week 1
August 2002, Week 5
August 2002, Week 4
August 2002, Week 3
August 2002, Week 2
August 2002, Week 1
July 2002, Week 5
July 2002, Week 4
July 2002, Week 3
July 2002, Week 2
July 2002, Week 1
June 2002, Week 5
June 2002, Week 4
June 2002, Week 3
June 2002, Week 2
June 2002, Week 1
May 2002, Week 5
May 2002, Week 4
May 2002, Week 3
May 2002, Week 2
May 2002, Week 1
April 2002, Week 5
April 2002, Week 4
April 2002, Week 3
April 2002, Week 2
April 2002, Week 1
March 2002, Week 5
March 2002, Week 4
March 2002, Week 3
March 2002, Week 1
February 2002, Week 4
February 2002, Week 3
February 2002, Week 2
February 2002, Week 1
January 2002, Week 5
January 2002, Week 4
January 2002, Week 3
January 2002, Week 2
January 2002, Week 1
December 2001, Week 5
December 2001, Week 4
December 2001, Week 3
December 2001, Week 2
December 2001, Week 1
November 2001, Week 5
November 2001, Week 4
November 2001, Week 3
November 2001, Week 2
November 2001, Week 1
October 2001, Week 5
October 2001, Week 4
October 2001, Week 3
October 2001, Week 2
October 2001, Week 1
September 2001, Week 5
September 2001, Week 4
September 2001, Week 3
September 2001, Week 2
September 2001, Week 1
August 2001, Week 5
August 2001, Week 4
August 2001, Week 3
August 2001, Week 2
August 2001, Week 1
July 2001, Week 5
July 2001, Week 4
July 2001, Week 3
July 2001, Week 2
July 2001, Week 1
June 2001, Week 5
June 2001, Week 4
June 2001, Week 3
June 2001, Week 2
June 2001, Week 1
May 2001, Week 5
May 2001, Week 4
May 2001, Week 3
May 2001, Week 2
May 2001, Week 1
April 2001, Week 5
April 2001, Week 4
April 2001, Week 3
April 2001, Week 2
April 2001, Week 1
March 2001, Week 5
March 2001, Week 4
March 2001, Week 3
March 2001, Week 2
March 2001, Week 1
February 2001, Week 4
February 2001, Week 3
February 2001, Week 2
February 2001, Week 1
January 2001, Week 5
January 2001, Week 4
January 2001, Week 3
January 2001, Week 2
January 2001, Week 1
December 2000, Week 5
December 2000, Week 4
December 2000, Week 3
December 2000, Week 2
December 2000, Week 1
November 2000, Week 5
November 2000, Week 4
November 2000, Week 3
November 2000, Week 2
November 2000, Week 1
October 2000, Week 5
October 2000, Week 4
October 2000, Week 3
October 2000, Week 2
October 2000, Week 1
September 2000, Week 5
September 2000, Week 4
September 2000, Week 3
September 2000, Week 2
September 2000, Week 1
August 2000, Week 5
August 2000, Week 4
August 2000, Week 3
August 2000, Week 2
August 2000, Week 1
July 2000, Week 5
July 2000, Week 4
July 2000, Week 3
July 2000, Week 2
July 2000, Week 1
June 2000, Week 5
June 2000, Week 4
June 2000, Week 3
June 2000, Week 2
June 2000, Week 1
May 2000, Week 5
May 2000, Week 4
May 2000, Week 3
May 2000, Week 2
May 2000, Week 1
April 2000, Week 5
April 2000, Week 4
April 2000, Week 3
April 2000, Week 2
April 2000, Week 1
March 2000, Week 5
March 2000, Week 4
March 2000, Week 3
March 2000, Week 2
March 2000, Week 1
February 2000, Week 5
February 2000, Week 4
February 2000, Week 3
February 2000, Week 2
February 2000, Week 1
January 2000, Week 5
January 2000, Week 4
January 2000, Week 3
January 2000, Week 2
January 2000, Week 1
December 1999, Week 5
December 1999, Week 4
December 1999, Week 3
December 1999, Week 2
December 1999, Week 1
November 1999, Week 5
November 1999, Week 4
November 1999, Week 3
November 1999, Week 2
November 1999, Week 1
October 1999, Week 5
October 1999, Week 4
October 1999, Week 3
October 1999, Week 2
October 1999, Week 1
September 1999, Week 5
September 1999, Week 4
September 1999, Week 3
September 1999, Week 2
September 1999, Week 1
August 1999, Week 5
August 1999, Week 4
August 1999, Week 3
August 1999, Week 2
August 1999, Week 1
July 1999, Week 5
July 1999, Week 4
July 1999, Week 3
July 1999, Week 2
July 1999, Week 1
June 1999, Week 5
June 1999, Week 4
June 1999, Week 3
June 1999, Week 2
June 1999, Week 1
May 1999, Week 5
May 1999, Week 4
May 1999, Week 3
May 1999, Week 2
May 1999, Week 1
April 1999, Week 5
April 1999, Week 4
April 1999, Week 3
April 1999, Week 2
April 1999, Week 1
March 1999, Week 5
March 1999, Week 4
March 1999, Week 3
March 1999, Week 2
March 1999, Week 1
February 1999, Week 5
February 1999, Week 4
February 1999, Week 3
February 1999, Week 2
February 1999, Week 1
January 1999, Week 5
January 1999, Week 4
January 1999, Week 3
January 1999, Week 2
January 1999, Week 1
December 1998, Week 5
December 1998, Week 4
December 1998, Week 3
December 1998, Week 2
December 1998, Week 1
November 1998, Week 5
November 1998, Week 4
November 1998, Week 3
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November 1998, Week 1
October 1998, Week 5
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September 1998, Week 5
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July 1998, Week 5
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June 1998, Week 5
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June 1998, Week 3
June 1998, Week 2
June 1998, Week 1
May 1998, Week 5
May 1998, Week 4
May 1998, Week 3
May 1998, Week 2
May 1998, Week 1
April 1998, Week 5
April 1998, Week 4
April 1998, Week 3
April 1998, Week 2
April 1998, Week 1
March 1998, Week 5
March 1998, Week 4
March 1998, Week 3
March 1998, Week 2
March 1998, Week 1
February 1998, Week 5
February 1998, Week 4
February 1998, Week 3
February 1998, Week 2
February 1998, Week 1
January 1998, Week 5
January 1998, Week 4
January 1998, Week 3
January 1998, Week 2
January 1998, Week 1
December 1997, Week 5
December 1997, Week 4
December 1997, Week 3
December 1997, Week 2
December 1997, Week 1
November 1997, Week 5
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November 1997, Week 3
November 1997, Week 2
November 1997, Week 1
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February 1997, Week 1

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