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CONLANG  March 2010, Week 3

CONLANG March 2010, Week 3

Subject:

Re: OT: TV doldrums (and Swedish/Norwegian questions)

From:

Andreas Johansson <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 19 Mar 2010 22:19:00 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

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text/plain (67 lines)

On Fri, Mar 19, 2010 at 9:41 PM, Andrew Jarrette <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 09:45:18 +0100, Andreas Johansson <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
>>On Fri, Mar 19, 2010 at 5:34 AM, Roger Mills <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> ombi tayondre ta yale tapes-tapesni ri cikani, macayi matingas "ambunukni
> kaçut krat çarek alo hindayi", re senda yuka-yukar ri malta.
>>>
>>> Because there was nothing at all on TV tonight, I had to watch "World's
> Strongest Man Competition", which was taking place in Malta.
>>>
>>> Two oddities-- there was a Swedish guy named Alsjo or Arsjo (I
> disremember whether l or r, it's the -sjo that's in question), which the
> (American) announcer kept pronouncing as [Olho] or [Orho]. Is that correct?
> (I assume the A in the printed form should have been A-ring?)
>>>
>>
>>Judging from WP, the gentleman's name is properly Årsjö, which would
>>be pronounced approximately [o:rx2:] in Swedish. [Orho] would be a
>>fairly sensible anglicization.
>>
>>
>>--
>>Andreas Johansson
>>
>>Why can't you be a non-conformist just like everybody else?
>
>
> I have always heard the Swedish <sj>/<skj>/<stj>/<sk+e,i,y,ö,ä> sound as
> something that to an English ear sounds just like our old-fashioned
> pronunciation of <wh> in <what>, <wheat>, <why>, etc. (actually a
> pronunciation that is very rare nowadays, only in small limited areas of the
> U.S. and ostensibly in parts of Scotland, as far as I have heard), i.e. it
> sounds like /hw/.  It really sounds noticeably labial to my ear.

According to Ladefoged as quoted by WP, apparently some lects have
palatalized bilabial realization - I suppose something like [ɸʲ]. More
usual are dorsal fricatives, often labialized.

[snip]
> Last night Ms. Fältskog very much sounded like she was
> using /hw/ in words that sounded like /hwi:l/ (<skil>?) or /hwi:ld/
> (<skild>?) or something, I think with the meaning "divorce" or similar
> (unless it was another word that meant "divorce").

_Skild_ "divorced"*. I say [xɪld], but other lects have [xʷɪld] or
[χʷɪld] or similar, and as per above apparently a labial variant is
also found. There's also supposed to be a variant with a
postalveolar-velar dual fricative [ɧ], but if it exists it's rare. And
I believe a few conservative lects still retain a coronal
pronunciation - it used to be [ʃ] or thereabouts, which is why foreign
/ʃ/ tends to end up as this sound.

As you can tell, it's a highly variable phoneme, which I perhaps
should have pointed out in my previous post. In my own lect, it varies
between [x] and [xʷ] depending on what follows.



* The noun "divorce" is _skilsmässa_. The verb is _skilja_, or
reflexive _skiljas_.

-- 
Andreas Johansson

Why can't you be a non-conformist just like everybody else?

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