LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for CONLANG Archives


CONLANG Archives

CONLANG Archives


CONLANG@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CONLANG Home

CONLANG Home

CONLANG  May 2004, Week 4

CONLANG May 2004, Week 4

Subject:

The difficulties of being weirder than English

From:

Amanda Babcock <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 26 May 2004 11:01:05 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (35 lines)

Lately I've been rather cross about having English for a first language.
I want to invent something exotic and unique, but two things have made
me realize that English is already exotic, and I feel cheated :)

The first item: somebody here posted an interesting link a few weeks
ago to Talmy's typology of verbs of motion
(http://elies.rediris.es/elies11/cap2.htm, if anyone's interested).
I had never taken apart verbs of motion that way, and it was very strange
to realize that English, in lexicalizing *manner* of motion rather
than *path* (though we have also inherited path motion verbs ("enter",
"exit") from Romance languages), would actually be quite fascinating and
exotic - if only it weren't so familiar!

Item the second, I was reading Language Typology and Syntactic Description:
Volume 3, Grammatical Categories and the Lexicon, the article on Tense,
Aspect and Mode.  They mentioned that some languages in some situations
mark *both* absolute and relative tense, and (perhaps not being quite
awake yet) I thought, wow, that sounds cool and interesting, maybe this
will look like the Caucasian verbs that agree with 4 or 5 nouns in the
sentence.  But when I got to that section, the example language was -
guess what - English.  Of course.  We have verb structures like "will
have done".  I should have known...

I guess there's nothing for it but to pursue my ideas for languages
spoken by aliens with a different psychology :)  So, anybody have any
ideas what kind of social organization would lead to a language that
doesn't distinguish between singular and dual, but does distinguish
between singular/dual and plural? :)  Or, perhaps, agrees with odd vs.
even numbers? :)

Amanda
Actually, trying to work on a relatively normal noun-incorporating
polysynthetic language (if by "work on" one means "agonize over in very
abstract terms, then go off to do more research")

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Error during command authentication.

Error - unable to initiate communication with LISTSERV (errno=111). The server is probably not started.

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager