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CONLANG  September 2004, Week 3

CONLANG September 2004, Week 3

Subject:

NATLANG: alien sounds in interjections (was: new Unnamed Conlang)

From:

"J. 'Mach' Wust" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 20 Sep 2004 06:04:00 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

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text/plain (47 lines)

On Mon, 20 Sep 2004 09:27:01 +0200, Philip Newton <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

>On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 16:54:10 -0400, J. 'Mach' Wust
><[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> we use ['?m=?m=] or ['?@?@] for negation and [?m='hm=] or [?@'h@] for
>> affirmation even though our words can't have [m=], [?], or stressed [@].
>
>No [?]? Interesting; I thought this was a fairly universal German thing.

It's not. Not even Swiss standard German has the glottis stop, so that
|Spiegelei| 'fried egg' and |Spiegelei| 'reflection' are homophonous
(except for the major stress). I'm not quite sure of it, but I suspect that
all over the southern part of the German-speaking area, there's no glottis
stop. Likewise, southern phoneticians will tend to exclude the glottis stop
from the German phoneme system (but include /E:/).

>And I also have [m=] in words such as |geben| ["ge:bm=].

Because of the alemannic n-apokope, there's no n in endings. There's few
cases of /@m/-ending, but as far as I know, it has always a distinct schwa.

=======================================================

John Cowan wrote (Fri, 17 Sep 2004 17:37:50 -0400):

>J. 'Mach' Wust scripsit:
>
>> We use ['?m=?m=] or ['?@?@] for negation and [?m='hm=] or [?@'h@] for
>> affirmation even though our words can't have [m=], [?], or stressed [@].
>
>These are also used in American English and in Scots and Scottish English.
>AFAIK they are not common in the English of England, though not altogether
>unknown there either.

Interesting.

>However, I at least say the first affirmative form with a voiceless
>nasal rather than ['h]; the lips remain closed throughout.

Yes, that's a more description. I thought of it, but then I couldn't think
of a short way of writing a glottis stop coarticulated with a voiceless
[m_0].

g_0ry@_^s:
j. 'mach' wust

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