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TEI-L  May 2005

TEI-L May 2005

Subject:

Re: Tagging "on behalf of" information in document header

From:

Edward Vanhoutte <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Edward Vanhoutte <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 16 May 2005 09:28:48 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (191 lines)

I think the suggested use of <resp> and <respStmt> are correct. In the
DALF guidelines which document a modification of and extension to the
TEI guidelines and which are designed to cater for the encoding of
modern correspondence material we say the following about this:


The *<respStmt>* element can be used to describe any person other than
the author proper, that has contributed something to the contents of the
letter, be it conceptually or physically. It must be stressed that the
tracing of such contributions (non-material ones in particular) is not
the most straightforward task, and should be done with meticulous care
(as is the case with all aspects of the electronic edition of DALF
letters, of course). It may not always be easy to distinguish between
elements that are present on the document but are totally
unrelated/unimportant to its contents and thus can hardly be considered
as /contributions/, or elements that are so important they can be
considered as much more than just a contribution and thus be encoded in
a different way. As a rule, the encoder can safely use the *<respStmt>*
element within *<letHeading>* to identify a person who typed in the
letter, or provided some ideas for the contents (supposed this can be
traced at all). Yet, the encoder should keep a consistent practice
concerning the use of the *<respStmt>* for the identification of persons
who made some additions to the letter. For plain additions, their author
can also be identified within the *scribe* attribute of the *<hand>*
element inside the *<profileDesc>* element of the heading (see
http://www.tei-c.org./P4X/ref-HAND.html). For very lengthy and
substantial contributions the encoder should consider whether their
authors shouldn't better be encoded as separate authors, or even in
separate *<letPart>* elements (see 4.8. Distinct letter parts: <letPart>
<http://www.kantl.be/ctb/project/dalf/dalfdoc/DALFheader.html#letPart>).
Perhaps the TEI definition of *<respStmt>* (see
http://www.tei-c.org/P4X/ref-RESP.html) should give a good indication
regarding its use: (statement of responsibility) supplies a statement
of responsibility for someone responsible for the intellectual content
of a text, edition, recording, or series, /where the specialized
elements for authors, editors, etc. do not suffice or do not apply/
[italics added].

The attributes of the *<respStmt>* element are those defined as the
global attributes (see 3.3. Global attributes
<http://www.kantl.be/ctb/project/dalf/dalfdoc/DALFstructure.html#global>).
It can contain a standard TEI *<resp>* element (see
http://www.tei-c.org/P4X/ref-ROLE.html), naming the nature of the
responsibility of the person identified in a standard TEI *<name>*
element (see http://www.tei-c.org./P4X/ref-NAME.html), and can
furthermore contain the elements of the *Incl* element class (see Incl
<http://www.kantl.be/ctb/project/dalf/dalfdoc/ref-decl-Incl.html>).

The following example illustrates the extensive identification of the
communicative participants within the *<letHeading>* part of a DALF
letter written by Streuvels to De Meyer. Here, it could be stated that
Streuvels dictated the letter to his wife, who typed it in. Thus,
Streuvels can be considered the intellectual author of the letter, while
his wife can be attributed responsibility as scribe. Also, an idea in
the letter could be attributed by the encoder to Joris Lannoo. As
indicated in the attributes, both sender and addressee are identified
from evidence inside the letter:

<author attested="yes">Stijn Streuvels</author>
<addressee attested="yes">Maurice De Meyer</addressee>
<respStmt>
   <resp>scribe</resp>
   <name>Alida Staelens</name>
</respStmt>
<respStmt>
   <resp>idea for the suggestion to use an instalment system of publication</resp>
   <name>Joris Lannoo</name>
</respStmt>


The DALF guidelines can be accessed from
<http://www.kantl.be/ctb/project/dalf/dalfdoc/index.html>. They're
gradually being used in more projects worldwide.

Best,

Edward


Lou Burnard wrote:

> Yes, the <respStmt> is a powerful beast well suited to these and other
> manouvers. For example, in discussion with Matthew Driscoll, it seems
> that similar usages might be apopropriate for things like manuscripts
> which claim internally to have been written by someone other than the
> author now assigned to them by modern scholarship. The number of works
> attributed to Aristotle, for example, would have required a small
> army of time-travelling sages to have produced (rather as the number of
> fragments of the true cross if assembled would have made ben
> sufficient to build a really quite substantial potting shed). But the
> attribution is quite important and interesting in the history of the
> text. So the suggestion would be to use a <respStmt> with a <resp> like
> "internally attributed to".
>
> It might be useful to collect r such cases where resp is used for a
> specific class of responsibility, with a view to suggesting some
> standard wordings for them, maybe in P5.
>
>
>
> could possibly have produced On 13 May 2005, at 22:33, Anh Bui wrote:
>
>> David,
>>
>> We also have many letters that fall into the same category you describe
>> and are planning to pursue a similar solution. That is, for a letter
>> written on Samuel Clemens's behalf, we'll treat the writer as the
>> primary author and indicate in a <resp> statement that Clemens bears
>> some responsibility for the content. We also make sure that the
>> situation is reflected in the title of the document, so that it is
>> absolutely clear to readers. For instance:
>>
>> Letter from Isabel V. Lyon to William Dean Howells, /for/ Samuel L.
>> Clemens, 15 March 1905
>>
>> Letters written or typed by an amanuensis, but manifestly dictated by
>> Clemens are indicated with the word "per":
>>
>> Letter from Samuel L. Clemens to William Dean Howells, /per/ Isabel V.
>> Lyon, 16 March 1908
>>
>> We also have a number of complex variations on the above situations,
>> including notes taken down by his secretary instructing her to write a
>> letter on Clemens's behalf. As we dig deeper into the correspondence
>> we'll no doubt test this model further, but it seems sound for now.
>>
>> Anh Bui
>> Mark Twain Project
>> University of California, Berkeley
>> 2195 Hearst, Suite 330
>> Berkeley, CA 94720-6400
>>
>>
>> David Sewell wrote:
>>
>>> I need to advise the editor of the Dolley Madison Digital Edition on
>>> how
>>> to handle a particular situation that crops in in DM's later
>>> correspondence. As her health fails, she sometimes dictates her
>>> letters,
>>> and sometimes delegates her brother to write a letter on her behalf.
>>>
>>> Handling a dictated letter is straightforward, because the author
>>> remains Dolley Madison, so this just means adding appropriate tags to
>>> indicate the document scribe/hand. But when the "I" of the letter is
>>> her
>>> brother, it seems obvious that he should be assigned to the <author>
>>> tag. So an obvious strategy would be something like
>>>
>>> <author>John Coles Payne</author>
>>> <respStmt>
>>> <resp>authority</resp>
>>> <name>Dolley Payne Madison</name>
>>> </respStmt>
>>>
>>> Is this reasonable? Has anyone adopted a different convention for
>>> cases
>>> like this?
>>>
>>> DS
>>>
>>> --
>>> David Sewell, Editorial and Technical Manager
>>> Electronic Imprint, The University of Virginia Press
>>> PO Box 400318, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4318 USA
>>> Courier: 310 Old Ivy Way, Suite 302, Charlottesville VA 22903
>>> Email: [log in to unmask] Tel: +1 434 924 9973
>>> Web: http://www.ei.virginia.edu/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
> From the Macmini at Burnard Towers
>

--

=============
Edward Vanhoutte
Co-ordinator
Centrum voor Teksteditie en Bronnenstudie - CTB
Centre for Scholarly Editing and Document Studies
Associate Editor, Literary and Linguistic Computing
Koningstraat 18 / b-9000 Gent / Belgium
tel: +32 9 265 93 51 / fax: +32 9 265 93 49
edward dot vanhoutte at kantl dot be
http://www.kantl.be/ctb/
http://www.kantl.be/ctb/vanhoutte/

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