LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for TEI-L Archives


TEI-L Archives

TEI-L Archives


TEI-L@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Monospaced Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

TEI-L Home

TEI-L Home

TEI-L  March 2006

TEI-L March 2006

Subject:

Re: tag spoken sections in fiction corpora

From:

Michael Beddow <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Michael Beddow <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 21 Mar 2006 10:07:46 -0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (90 lines)

Lou Burnard wrote:

> It doesn't actually predate the TEI that much, and doesn't predate
> SGML at all.

I made my conjectural epochal assignment of the conception and design of
Burrows' undertaking not in ignorance of the chronology of the TEI and SGML,
but in all too painful knowledge of the leisurely pace of UK academic
publishing in those days, especially when the work so remote from the
publisher's usual repertoire is concerned. I generally reckon you can safely
subtract a decade from the date of anything OUP or CUP published in the 80s
to arrive at the period an author did most of the essential thinking. But
that was just a rough guess. The main point behind my "predating" claim is
that the actual approach to encoding Burrows describes and deployed
(although not the purposes to which he puts the encoding) are pretty remote
from either the TEI philosophy or SGML approaches. If he had actually
designed, rather than completed, his project in the mid-eighties, his
encoding choices would have been rather more questionable.

> > he got statistically stronger differentiations by considering
> > the frequency and collocations/colligations of such "stopwords" in the
> > speech assigned to specific characters than he did from more apparently
> > "characteristic" stylistic or lexical features.
>
> I'm surprised to see someone generally so careful with language as
> Michael implying that "collocation" and "colligation" are
> interchangeable technical terms.

Rather the reverse of that implication was intended. Many of the
co-occurrences I was referring to in respect of Burrows' stopwords discovery
were colligations. Some, however, were collocations. And still others would
be excluded from either category by some analysts, who would claim that the
co-occurrences concerned were merely the consequence of the words in
question being so common in the English language and hence not
characteristic of this specific text (which is why TACTs COLLGEN module, for
example. to uses z-scoring to filter them out). So I used the alternation of
the terms deliberately and advisedly. I could have said simply
"co-occurrence" which covers both, but excludes the implication of
statistical significance (and therefore the logical underpinning which
offers some assurance that the observed phenomena are reliable pieces of
evidence on which to build an argument, a matter to which I wanted to allude
a little later on).

As to Martin's expansion of what he had in mind, I'm not sure that the plain
demarcation between narrative voice on the one hand and the speech/thought
of characters which the sort of markup he envisages could readily
encode is so late a phenomenon in the history of prose fiction. As
Burrows' work indicates, it has already no longer available in Austen's
writings; it would be extremely difficult to make in Die
Wahlverwandtschaften (1809) which is not particularly avant garde in that
aspect of its technique at least; and I don't think it could be easily, or
uncontentiously, applied to considerable stretches of fictional prose by
Sterne or Fielding. But that doesn't affect the feasibility of marking up
quoted speech for what it is, so as to be able to use the machine to
investigate if and how it differs within the texts concerned from passages
in the narratorial voice. It is just that one might have to be wary of
passages in that voice which were indirect renderings of the thoughts or
utterances of characters although they lacked the explicit subjunctive and
other markings which such indirect reporting bears in, say, Classical Latin
historical narration.

As for feasibility, plainly if the text concerned has already been marked up
using <q> to encode quotation marks, then a lot of the spadework has been
done. If the text uses standard quotation marks, then suitable heuristics
can be deployed to make a first pass at converting them to <q> notation, but
quite a lot of careful postediting would be required, especially since
inadvertently unterminated quotations are quite common, even in carefully
typeset text. Where there are no typographical indications of direct speech
boundaries (as is often the case in 18C and19C German fiction, possibly
because of the visual assertiveness of quotation marks in broken-letter
typography), the task begins to look daunting, except in epic or quasi epic
texts where "speeches" are largely monolithic and are introduced, and often
also terminated, by highly formulaic phrases readily identified by machine.
Of course, "he said" etc is equally formulaic, but such phrases tend to be
deployed in ways which make their automatic recognition as speech boundary
markers very much more difficult.

As to whether it would be worthwhile, I think that largely depends on the
chosen texts and the extent to which there is a chance that making them
amenable to machine assisted analysis would yield results not readily
demonstrable by other means. One well-informed and generally plausible
early advocate of Humanities computing used to rather let down his own case
by what was meant to be a culminatory demonstration that the preponderance
of certain adjectives in Kafka's novels, as manifested by an OCP run,
allowed us to conclude that they were of a somewhat gloomy tenor. Most of
his audience felt that they could discern, and indeed demonstrate, that
without letting the pointy-heads loose.

Michael Beddow

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995
April 1995
March 1995
February 1995
January 1995
December 1994
November 1994
October 1994
September 1994
August 1994
July 1994
June 1994
May 1994
April 1994
March 1994
February 1994
January 1994
December 1993
November 1993
October 1993
September 1993
August 1993
July 1993
June 1993
May 1993
April 1993
March 1993
February 1993
January 1993
December 1992
November 1992
October 1992
September 1992
August 1992
July 1992
June 1992
May 1992
April 1992
March 1992
February 1992
January 1992
December 1991
November 1991
October 1991
September 1991
August 1991
July 1991
June 1991
May 1991
April 1991
March 1991
February 1991
January 1991
December 1990
November 1990
October 1990
September 1990
August 1990
July 1990
June 1990
April 1990
March 1990
February 1990
January 1990

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager