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TEI-L  May 2006

TEI-L May 2006

Subject:

Re: TEI to XHTML (was Re: TEI Cookbook?)

From:

Martin Holmes <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Tue, 9 May 2006 08:08:21 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (115 lines)

This is interesting and impressive stuff, but surely it would make life
easier if we were to conclude that what TEI means by <p> (something
close to the broad typographical paragraph, which allows embedded block
elements) is not the same thing at all as what XHTML means by <p> (the
lowest level textual block element, allowing no block children, and not
equivalent to a typographical paragraph at all). When we render TEI to
XHTML, we're actually doing something which is closer to rendering to
XSL:FO than it is to creating an equivalent conceptual document
structure; the XHTML is basically a rendering representation which
enables us to map CSS and JavaScript to elements for the purposes of
display. It would be impossible to create a realistic rendering of a
complex TEI document in the much simpler XHTML element space, and I
don't think we need to try. If people need to see the "true" structural
representation of the document, they can look at the TEI XML; XHTML is
just a convenience for browser-rendering.

So I think it's perfectly fine to turn <p> tags into <div type="para">,
just as it's OK to turn <note> elements into <div type="PopupNote"> and
manipulate them with JavaScript; it's just a GUI for the document.

Cheers,
Martin

George Cristian Bina wrote:
> Hi Sebastian, Syd
> 
> Both solutions are basically the same thing as they are based both in 
> determining the elements that need to be placed outside of p and iterate 
> on them and enclose the content between them, if exists, in p tags.
> There are a couple of differences as I assumed as known the elements 
> that can go inside p while Syd's/Jeni's solution assumes as known the 
> elements that cannot appear inside p.
> The main issue is to determine the content inside p that should stay 
> there while the current node is an element that cannot be placed inside 
> p. It is easy to obtain the preceding element that cannot be placed 
> inside p as one can just walk on the preceding-sibling axes and get the 
> first such element, precedingNonInP in my stylesheet. Then basically you 
> have two elements that are both children of a node and you need to get 
> the content between them.
> 
> p
>  child1
>  child2
>  fromHere
>  toDetermine1
>  toDetermine2
>  toHere
>  child7
>  child8
> 
> In the above sample for instance we need to determine the nodes between 
> fromHere and toHere knowing both fromHere and toHere.
> I determined that walking from the fromHere on the following-sibling 
> axes, that is testing
>  toDetermine1
>  toDetermine2
>  toHere
>  child7
>  child8
> and the test checks that the first preceding sibling that cannot be 
> present inside p is the node we started from, fromHere. The toHere node 
> also pass this test so I added another check to exclude also the toHere 
> node that is what the current() funtion returns.
> 
> The same idea is in Jeni's code but that walks in the other direction, 
> from toHere to fromHere in the above example. $before-me points to 
> fromHere and the current node is also toHere. The nodes that are tested 
> are the preceding siblings of the current node, that is:
>  child1
>  child2
>  fromHere
>  toDetermine1
>  toDetermine2
> 
> and the test checks that the first preceding in:list or in:eg sibling is 
> fromHere. It may be the case that $before-me does not select anything 
> and in that case we want to take all nodes preceding the current node, 
> that is accomplished by not($before-me). Here it is the expression:
> 
> select="preceding-sibling::node()
>         [not($before-me) or
>         generate-id(preceding-sibling::node()[self::in:eg or 
> self::in:list][1]) =
>         generate-id($before-me)]" />
> 
> 
> I hope the above explanations help,
> George
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> George Cristian Bina
> <oXygen/> XML Editor, Schema Editor and XSLT Editor/Debugger
> http://www.oxygenxml.com
> 
> Sebastian Rahtz wrote:
>> George Cristian Bina wrote:
>>> Here it is the full solution to correct invalid XHTML p tags. It also
>>> accumulates the largest amount of text and tags that can be enclosed in
>>> a p element. For instance the following invalid XHTML
>>>
>>
>> wow. another awesome bit of code. I've never seen anyone use an entity
>> like that in XSLT.
>>
>> Now I'm torn between your method and Syd/Jeni's stuff!
>>
> 

-- 
Martin Holmes
University of Victoria Humanities Computing and Media Centre
([log in to unmask])
Half-Baked Software, Inc.
([log in to unmask])
[log in to unmask]

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