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AUXLANG  June 2006, Week 5

AUXLANG June 2006, Week 5

Subject:

Re: English is the best auxlang!

From:

Kjell Rehnström <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

International Auxiliary Languages <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 29 Jun 2006 11:31:46 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

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text/plain (53 lines)

Den 2006-06-27 09:44:17 skrev Jens Wilkinson <[log in to unmask]>:


> Yes, people abbreviate things, but I wonder if you'd
> find that words in old english are longer than the
> ones we use today. I sort of doubt it, actually.

The shortest word I could think of in Swedish is ö, meaning island.  
Ackording to Hellquist's etymological dictionary of Swedish it is related  
to an I-E. akwa, thus meaning something like "land on water", i.e. near  
water or surrounded by it.


  Sure,

> The grammar is a very different issue. I am aware of
> the supposed tendency for European languages to move
> from agglutinative toward isolating, and incidentally
> the two most spoken languages in the world are
> strongly isolating.
Both in Swedish and Bulgarian there was a strong influence through other  
people who came to the country and this led to a simplification of  
inflexions. I wonder if this doesn't happen when a language with  
inflexions meet languages with words who don't go into the system. A  
modern example is the ward "radio" which is not inflected in Russian. With  
many new words that don't go into the system, even Russian will eventually  
lose its cases! But it will take time. In some Slavic and Baltic languages  
one can notice a coincidence of cases, and in Latin as well, so this is  
nothing new.

What I don't know is if there is any languages where the grammar has been  
more complicated. The only tendency I can think of is that some weak verbs  
in Swedish are becomming strong. In languages everything is analogy and  
patterns, if you would believe me.

I wonder if writing will not hamper the evolution to more complex  
languages.


> some principle at work or is it just a chance
> occurrence? Well, actually, since we know that creoles
> tend to be isolating, it may simply be that when
> languages spread, they tend to become isolating, and
> then when they settle down in a single group of
> speakers, they tend more toward agglutination or
> something along those lines.

You are right. It would be interesting though to se a language getting new  
cases!

Kjell R
Använder Operas banbrytande e-postklient: http://www.opera.com/mail/

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