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AUXLANG  October 2006, Week 1

AUXLANG October 2006, Week 1

Subject:

Re: Tok Pisin

From:

MacLeod Dave <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

International Auxiliary Languages <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 2 Oct 2006 22:10:36 +0900

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (44 lines)

It might not even matter that much. Since the matter is a cultural one
and not a linguistic one, some cultures might have Sunday as day 1 and
others Saturday or Monday. It would be only about as difficult as
remembering time zones. "Let's see...so we'll do it on Day 1, that's
right, Day 6 to you. Our holy day, yes, one day before yours."
<--since they'd be speaking the same language there the IAL would be a
success even in a case like this.

2006/10/2, [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>:
> li [Jens Wilkinson] mi tulis
>
> > I'm not sure if I can make this understandable or not,
> > but I'm not sure why this is important. Suppose that
> > day1, day2, etc. is adopted for the days of the week
> > in some international standard. Wouldn't it then be
> > possible for individual cultures to decide what day is
> > "Monday" or "Tuesday" depending on how they want to
> > name it. So in other words, Jan. 1 2007 would be "day
> > 1" across the world, but it could be Saturday, Sunday
> > or Monday depending on how the local culture wanted to
> > call it. Of course, that means that a certain day
> > might be a Monday in one country and a Tuesday in
> > another, but it would still be the same date.
>
> 1-1-2007 would still be the same day of the week around the world
> regardless of the culture.  It's Monday on my caledar, and would be the
> equivalent of "Monday" even on other calendars as long as they too have
> a seven-day week.
>
> > Dana used the term "Monday" for the first day of the
> > week in China, but since they don't usually use the
> > term for "Monday" it doesn't really matter.
>
> No, but there is no alignment even among those whose systems just use
> terms like "1-day", "2-day", etc.  For Chinese "oneday" is Monday,  For
> Arabs, it's Saturday, and I believe Portuguese starts numbering on
> Sunday.   Many European languages call Saturday "Sabbath" though they
> actually honor the sabbath on Sunday where Islam practices the
> equivalent on Friday.   So I think it's important for an IAL to use
> something generic like a numbered system.  I can see two ways to number.
> Either start on Sunday which seems to be the most neutral place, or go
> with the ISO standard and start on Monday.
>

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