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TEI-L  October 2007

TEI-L October 2007

Subject:

Re: glossed examples

From:

Martin Holmes <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Wed, 17 Oct 2007 14:24:28 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (90 lines)

Hi there,

I have used <gloss> for this kind of thing in the past (especially in 
P4). The guidelines say <gloss>:

"identifies a phrase or word used to provide a gloss or definition for 
some other word or phrase"

which I choose to interpret quite broadly. Both of the attributes used 
to associate <gloss> formally with e.g. <term> are optional, and this 
example from the guidelines seems to suggest that your situation below 
is within the pale:

There is thus a striking accentual difference between a verbal form like 
<mentioned xml:id="cw234" xml:lang="grc">eluthemen</mentioned>
<gloss target="#cw234">we were released,</gloss> accented on the
second syllable of the word, and its participial derivative...

given that we could remove all the attributes from both the tags without 
rendering the code invalid. I don't see why you can't have a <gloss> for 
a full sentence, or even for a lengthy quote.

Cheers,
Martin

Stephen Shimanek wrote:
> 
> Hello all,
> 
> I've been following with interest the various discussions that have been 
> going on of late (endnote XML --> TEI, q vs quote, global@type, etc.)
> 
> The last has motivated me to enquire about glosses.  I have been using 
> my own terminology to continue on my markup of Jespersen's Philosophy of 
> Grammar, which I have asked about before...
> 
> The examples continue to give me trouble.
> 
> Very often an example is in Finnish and an English gloss (by which I 
> mean translation) is given.  In my own little "private TE" which 
> consists of Word character styles for the moment, I've been labeling 
> this "gloss".  I notice, however, that the PE5 definition of <gloss> 
> corresponds to <term> and not to examples.  For the equivalent of what 
> is meant by <gloss> I have been using <definition>, which clearly is not 
> equivalent to <def>. 
> 
> What to do about a fun little paragraph like the following, where the 
> example is in Latin, and the gloss given is in German (while the 
> metalanguage of the text is English), and moreover is a citation from 
> another linguist?
> 
> I hope you understand that I continue using <eg> for the Latin in my 
> private universe, but hope to be able to translate it into an acceptable 
> public TEI someday which would allow me to distinguish words under 
> discussion from full fledged examples of phenomena.
> 
>        Similar nexuses may be found also in other positions, where they
>     are not the object either of a verb or of a preposition, thus in
>     Lat. : /dubitabat nemo quin violati hospites, legati necati, pacati
>     atque socii nefario bello lacessiti, fana vexata hanc tantam
>     efficerent// vastitatem/ (Cicero, translated by Brugmann «dass die
>     mishandlung der gastfreunde, die ermorderung der gesandten, die
>     ruchlosen angriffe auf friedliche und verbündete völker, die
>     schändung der heiligtümer»).
> 
> Is the simplest solution without trying to create tags unnecessarily to 
> treat both as <cit> varying the type such that Cicero is coded as:<cit 
> lang="la" type="example"> and Brugmann as:<cit lang="de" 
> type="gloss_of_example">?
> Once all the examples of the first type of citation (along with the 
> examples) have been assigned a unique ID, we could perhaps then 
> backtrack through all the <cit type="gloss"> and cross-reference them 
> with the ID number taken from the preceding <cit type="example">.
> I admit that I've been reading the guidelines a little less lately in an 
> effort to really dig into what I need rather than what's available, but 
> any reactions at this stage would probably help steer me into productive 
> directions.  It is entirely possible I've completely overlooked a tag 
> that would be more appropriate, in which case I really thank you ahead 
> of time for pointing out even the obvious!
> Best wishes,
>    Steve Shimanek

-- 
Martin Holmes
University of Victoria Humanities Computing and Media Centre
([log in to unmask])
Half-Baked Software, Inc.
([log in to unmask])
[log in to unmask]

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