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AUXLANG  March 2008, Week 4

AUXLANG March 2008, Week 4

Subject:

Old discussion on LsF - how much of this is accurate?

From:

MacLeod Dave <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

International Auxiliary Languages <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 29 Mar 2008 02:02:56 +0900

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (361 lines)

I found this old discussion somewhere before, and it was just a single
page with a single line of text scrolling endlessly to the right. I
copied the text and saved it as a file to look at later, and there's
quite a bit of discussion on LsF grammar. How much of this is
accurate?

I'll try to edit it to make it as legible as possible. It's not always
possible to tell who is saying what.

------begin text------

There are a few pages on Peano's Latine Sine Flexione (Interlingua) in
"The Loom of Language," by Bodmer and Hogben, available in paperback
from Norton, ISBN 0-393-30034-X.  Here's a short summary from that
book: basically, Peano made the stem of all nouns from the ablative
form:" campo," "arte," "carne," etc.  The stem of verbs comes from the
imperative, the infinitive without "re," so you get "scribe" from
"scribere," "audi" from "audire," etc.

"Vox populi, vox dei" of Latin becomes "voce de populo, voce de deo"
in Peano's version.  There are no verb persons or number: "me habe" =
I have, "te habe = "you have," "nos habe"="we have."  There are no
genders, no definite or indefinite articles.  There is an optional
plural in "s"' : "patre habe filios"  =  " the  father has sons," but
you can also say "three sons" = "tres filio."

There are no mandatory verb tenses: "heri me es in London" =
"yesterday, I was in London," while "hodie illos es in Paris" = "today
they are in Paris," and "cras te es in New York" = "tomorrow you will
be in New York."  Where neded, "e" can express a past time, "i" (from
"ire") a future one, as in "me i bibe," = "I am going to drink," and
"me e bibe," = "I drank."

Pronouns aren't inflected for case: "me" = "I" or "me," "illo" = "he"
or "him."

Peano wrote in the early 1900's, and in 1915 published "Vocabulario
Commune" containing 14,000 words.

There are short references to Interlingua in some of Mario Pei's
books, and there have been work's on Interlingua since Peano's time,
though I'm not familiar with them.  I believe the main library at
Columbia (where I went to school) has one.          Hope this helps.
       Adam   ****************************************************************************

From: Jim Seger <JKSeger /c`e/ aol.com>: Subject: LsF Summary  Ken:
 Here is the summary of LsF I posted a year ago.  Currently I don't
have the time to pursue auxlang subjects but hope to get back into it
before too much longer.  I would be most pleased, Ken, if you would be
kind enough to repost this summary.

Regarding James Chandler's questions, I am not aware of any active
movements for naturalistic IALs other than Interlingua.  That does not
mean, however, that "this language now has invested in it all the
hopes of the naturalist movement." Regardless of how many people are
using Peano's LsF, I am convinced it is by far the most superior of
the naturalistic IALs.
Jim Seger

(An aside to Latin teachers: I suggest that teaching LsF, besides
providing learners with an outstanding international language, will
also serve to attract many of them to explore Latin itself.  Having a
good grasp of Latin's vocabulary, they can devote themselves
exclusively to learning its reputedly "formidable" grammar and
syntax).

****************************************************************************
 From: JKSeger /c`e/ AOL.COM Subject: CONLANG: Latino sine Flexione,
an introduction

Here is a brief introduction to Latino sine Flexione.  Primary sources
are:  1.  G. Peano, "Key to and Primer of Interlingua," E. P. Dutton &
Co., 1931 2.  any good Latin dictionary, e.g., Cassell's. 3.  A. Gode,
"Interlingua-English Dictionary," IALA, Frederick Ungar Publ. Co.,
1951

(The original name of Peano's language was Latino sine Flexione; it is
used here         instead of Interlingua to avoid confusion with
IALA's language of the same name).

For communication among most educated peoples of the world today,
Latin has the best possible vocabulary.  Such people already know or
can make reasonable guesses from general knowledge as to the meaning
of many Latin words.  So says Giuseppe Peano, the famous Italian
mathematician.  However, Latin's inflexions and syntax are overly
complex and a stumbling block to speakers of modern analytic
languages.  Thus, he says, let us strip Latin of its "ponderous burden
of inflexions" to obtain the ideal constructed language.

 Vocabulary:  Latino Sine Flexione (LSF) adopts all Latin words, Greek
words naturalized through Latin, and all commonly used international
words, e.g., hotel, hospital, communismo, radar, telephono,
microscopio, etc.  New words are formed from LsF in the same way they
are formed from Latin and Greek roots.  Also, words may be adopted
from any language if they are in international use, e.g., safari,
tequila, kaput, fakir, hors d'oeuvres, etc.

 Pronunciation: LsF is like Italian except that: C is the K in English
skill; CH is the k in English kill; G is as in English gill; H is as
in English hill; J is as in German jung; V is like the W in English
wine (or alternately in German Wein); Y is like the U as in French tu;
AE is like the AI in English aisle; OE is like the OI in English boil.

Word order is typically SVO and is similar to English and the modern
romance languages.  Adjectives may immediately precede or follow the
noun modified.  Adverbs similarly stand next to the verb modified.
Definite and indefinite articles (the, a, an) are not used.
Cases: There are no case inflections.  The genitive of possession is
noted using "de". Thus, "manu de puella" means "the girl's hand".  The
dative is indicated by "ad" when necessary for clarity.  We express
"give our book to her" as "da nostro libro ad illa" or "da (ad) illa
nostro libro".  The accusative is noted by word order, placing the
direct object after the verb.  Thus, we say "The woman sees the girl"
as "femina vide puella".  However, for emphasis or contrast, the
direct object may come first if the meaning is clear.  Thus, we may
say "it is the girl, not the boy, whom the mother sees" as "es puella,
non puero, qui matre vide".

Nouns:  Singular nouns are formed from the Latin ablative singular.
The singular may be used in place of the plural, e.g., tres puella.
Use of a plural form is optional and is formed from the Latin
accusative plural.

Singular:                                 Plural: \tab   Latin
      LsF  Latin                  LsF \tab
puella              puella              puellae                puellas \tab
populus             populo              populi                 populos \tab
liber               libro               libri                  libros \tab
donum               dono                dona                   dona  \tab
rex                 rege                reges                  reges \tab
manus               manu                manus                  manus \tab
dies                die                 dies                   dies

Adjectives & Adverbs: Adjectives are formed from the Latin neuter
ablative singular, and adverbs are formed from these adjectives by
changing the final vowel to e.  Thus:         LATIN
     LsF Adj.               LsF Adv.
magnus, a, um                  magno                  magne
liber, a, um                   libero                 libere
pulcher, ra, rum               pulchro                pulchre
fortis, is, e                  forti                  forte
acer, ris, re                  acri                   acre
potens                         potenti                potente

Optionally, adverbs may keep the same form as adjectives or may be
expressed by a periphrase, e.g., "in modo diligente", "cum mente
diligente", etc.    The comparative is formed by placing "plus" before
the adjective or adverb.  Thus, "plus pulchro" means "more beautiful".
 "Plus pulchre" means "more beautifully".    The superlative is formed
similarly by the word "maximo".  Thus, "maximo forti"  means
"strongest".  "Maximo forte" means "most strongly".    An alternate
superlative is formed by inserting "issim" before the final vowel of
the adjective or adverb.  Thus, "fortissime" means "most strongly" but
has the connotation of merely being very strong but not necessarily
the strongest of all.

Verbs:  Dropping the "re" ending from the Latin infinitive forms the
LsF imperative, prohibitive and present tense.

Imperative:   labora!    Prohibitive:  non labora! The present tense
is identical to the imperative and makes use of personal pronouns to
replace Latin's verbal endings for indicating person and number.

Present Tense:        me labora                  nos labora       te
labora                  vos labora       illo, illa labora
illos, illas labora

The present tense is to be used whenever possible to express other
verbal tenses. For example, "I will work tomorrow" becomes simply
"Cras me labora."  "I worked yesterday" becomes "Heri me labora."
Whenever use of the present tense is inadequate, LsF provides
periphrastic verbal constructions that are similar in form to English.
 The periphrastic past tense uses the auxiliary verb habere and the
verbal past participle:

Past Tense:       me habe laborato             nos habe laborato
te habe laborato             vos habe laborato       illo, illa habe
laborato     illos, illas habe laborato

A future tense may be formed using the auxiliary "i" or "va" or "vol".
 For example,     "me vol labora" means "I will work". Present active
participle: formed from the Latin in the ablative case.  For example,
    "laborante" means "working". Progressive verbal aspect: formed
using the verb "es" and the present active participle.

Present:   "illa es scribente" means "she is writing"

Past:      "illa era scribente" means "she was writing"

Future:    "illa vol es scribente" means "she will be writing" Passive
Voice: formed using the verb "es" and the past participle.  For
example,      "vos es servato" means "you are served"; "vos era
servato" means "you were served", etc. Other verbal aspects such as
the imperfect and continuative require circumlocutions, e.g.:
"illo soleba dicere" means "he used to say"     "illos persiste id
agere" means "they keep on doing it" The conditional and subjunctive
follow the indicative forms, e.g.:     "si hoc pulvere es strychnino,
canes jam es mortuo" means      "if this powder were strichnine, the
dogs would already be dead".

Finally, Peano accepts these irregular verb forms: dic, duc, es, fac,
fer, ir, vol.

Sample LsF Paragraph:   LSF es lingua artificiale que omne persona
pote scribe et dice facilemente.  Suo vocabulario non es formato ad
arbitrio, sed contine vocabulos hodie in usu in vario linguas.  Pro
iste ratione illo habe maximo praecisione de expressione et es vivente
organismo.  Illo es analytico et libero ab mortuo pondere de
grammatica.  Illo es facto pro facilitate de communicatione
internationale in scientia, technologia, commercio et administratione.
               Jim Seger

****************************************************************************
 From: JKSeger /c`e/ AOL.COM Subject: CONLANG: Latino sine Flexione
(LsF)  Francisco Loaiza wrote:
> I have some questions about LSF:
> Since my Italian is not all that great, how about the pronuntiation of <t>?
> Is it <ts> like in medieval Latin, or more like English <t>?  Modern Italian <t> is pronounced like English <t> in <still>, not the  aspirated English <t> in <till>.  > Do you pronounce double letters as such or as a single one? E.g. <bello>  > as <bel-lo> or <beh-lo>?

Peano doesn't address double letters. However, Italian pronounces
double  letters as double, not as a sign to shorten the preceding
vowel.

> Is the general rule that you take the <ablative> singular of the Latin
> noun and make it the singular form and then add <s> for the plural?

This would yield the same result in all cases expect for nouns from
the  third declension where the stem changes, e.g., <rex, reges>.

> Are <es> and <era> the only two forms of <to be> needed?

To my knowledge Peano didn't provide a complete list of irregular
forms. I have come across the forms <fui> and <esse>.

>> Other verbal aspects such as the imperfect and continuative require
>> circumlocutions, e.g.:
>>     "illo soleba dicere" means "he used to say"
>>     "illos persiste id agere" means "they keep on doing it"
> Are there more of these extra verbal forms or is <soleba> the only other
> auxiliary form needed?

LsF is not limited to these two circumlocutions.  Others are
permissible  provided they can be readily understood by analyzing each
word separately.

>> The conditional and subjunctive follow the indicative forms, e.g.:
>>     "si hoc pulvere es strychnino, canes jam es mortuo" means
>>     "if this powder were strichnine, the dogs would already be dead".
> Is <si hoc pulvere <era> strychnino. . . . .
> another valid subjunctive
> formation? (If this powder had been. . . .
> )  Yes, it is.
> me age multas gratias Mr. Seger, et spera meas questiones non es nimis
> difficiles :-) >            Francisco

Mr. Loaiza, vestro questiones non es nimis difficile usque ad
praesentia. At cras? :-)              Jim Seger ------- following not
sent. Seriously, I am not overly concerned with being able to answer
all your  future questions.  The reason is not that I know all the
answers (which  I don't) but rather that LsF users consider it a
growing language  accepts departures from its rules so long  as the
meaning is clear.  Thus, your phrase <meas questiones> was clear  to
me even though LsF's rules would produce <meo questiones>. Of course,
the onus is on the writer to make sure the meaning is clear to the
intended audience.
****************************************************************************

From: JKSeger /c`e/ AOL.COM Subject: Re: CONLANG: Latino sine Flexione
(LsF)  Edmund Grimley-Evans commented on this exchange:
>>> Is the general rule that you take the <ablative> singular of the Latin
>>> noun and make it the singular form and then add <s> for the plural?
>> This would yield the same result in all cases expect for nouns from the
>> third declension where the stem changes, e.g., <rex, reges>.
> I thought the LsF singular was the ablative singular and the plural
> was the accusative plural form, so you don't get the same result with
>   - second declension neuter nouns: dono, dona
>   - third declension neuter nouns: animali, animalia; opere, opera
>   - fourth declension neuter nouns: genu, genua

Yes, Edmund, you are certainly correct.  One may not simply add an "s"
 in LsF to form the plural of Latin neuter nouns.       Jim Seger
****************************************************************************

From: JKSeger /c`e/ aol.com Subject: Re: CONLANG: re: LsF  I.  Ken
Caviness wrote:
 >> One may not simply add an "s"
>> in LsF to form the plural of Latin neuter nouns.
> I wonder why Peano did it this way, and why his successors haven't
> found a way to simplify this.  As long as he was stripping Latin of
> its "ponderous burden of inflexions", might as well take out one
> more irregularity that doesn't contribute to the meaning.  But maybe
> this is why the plural is optional?
Peano didn't want to introduce any forms foreign to Latin.

>> Peano accepts these irregular verb forms: dic, duc, es, fac, fer, ir, vol.
> What are the meanings of these verb forms, and in what way are they
> irregular?

As well as I can judge, these "irregular" forms come from the
following:    1.  dic, duc, fac, fer are the imperative forms in Latin
of dicere, ducere, facere,         and ferre.  Peano uses them for
both the imperative and present tense.    2.  es derives from "esse",
the Latin verb "to be."  It is actually the second         person
singular form, i.e., "tu es" means "you are" in Latin, but Peano
   extends its use to cover all persons and number.    3.  vol comes
from Latin "volo" meaning "I will, wish, am willing," formed in
 Latin irregularly from the infinitive "velle."    4.  ir comes from
the Latin infinitive "ire" meaning "to go."  I can't figure out
why Peano chose "ir" rather than "i" which Latin forms regularly from
its        infinitive.  Did he feel that "i" is too bare a form to
retain a distinct sound         when used in the present tense?  Try
saying over and over, "me i"        meaning "I go."  It sounds mushy
and indistinct after a while, right?  But         this is just a guess
on my part.

> I see a mention of your post on the Latin list concerning LsF.  Is that
> the same material you sent here to the conlang list?   Both posts contain the same information.
> LsF interests me, especially since Latin is on my "to learn" list.
> (No dates set yet, though!)  It sounds like it would be a great way
> to drill Latin vocabulary.

I of course enthusiastically agree!  However, whoever wishes
eventually to be able to read, write or speak Latin should realize
that simply recognizing words is not enough; s/he will need to know
other things as well.  For example, suppose the student sees this
Latin sentence:          "tempestas magna mare turbat."   Does it mean
"the great storm troubles the sea" or "the storm troubles the great
sea?"  The reader in this case must know the gender of the nouns:
tempestas is feminine, and mare is neuter; the adjective magna is
feminine and so must modify tempestas.  To modify mare, it would have
to be magnum.  Verbs pose similar requirements.  But, in any case,
learning the vocabulary is a huge step toward knowing Latin or any
language for that matter.   II.  Edmund Grimley-Evans commented on
this exchange:
>> Whatever effort a student puts into LsF is never wasted if s/he turns
>> eventually to learning Latin for the words are in fact unadulterated
>> Latin without any admixture of foreign elements.  LsF wouldn't be caught
>> dead using "lingvo" rather than "lingua."
> I thought you said before that "international" words such as "hotel"
> and "hors d'oeuvre" were used in LsF, and I was going to ask how such
> words are to be pronounced ...

I can't find a reference where Peano explains how to pronounce words
from languages other than Latin.  My guess is that we should first try
to pronounce such words as if they were LsF words.  Words such as
"fakir" are easy as they contain only phonemes already  existing in
LsF.  (However, "fakir" varies from LsF in that the  accent falls on
the last syllable).  On the other hand, the word  "Hors d'oeurves" is
clearly harder in that the French vowel sound  in "oeurve" has no
counterpart in LsF.  Perhaps it should remain a  matter of personal
choice whether one ultimately renders the word as  pronounced in its
native language or one limits oneself to uttering  only phonemes
existent in LsF.  Frankly, I prefer the former.         Jim Seger
****************************************************************************
\par
}


-- 
http://idistaro.com

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May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 5
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 4
December 2011, Week 5
December 2011, Week 4
December 2011, Week 3
December 2011, Week 2
December 2011, Week 1
November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
October 2011, Week 5
October 2011, Week 4
October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
August 2011, Week 5
August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 5
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 4
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 5
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007, Week 5
December 2007, Week 4
December 2007, Week 3
December 2007, Week 2
December 2007, Week 1
November 2007, Week 5
November 2007, Week 4
November 2007, Week 3
November 2007, Week 2
November 2007, Week 1
October 2007, Week 5
October 2007, Week 4
October 2007, Week 3
October 2007, Week 2
October 2007, Week 1
September 2007, Week 5
September 2007, Week 4
September 2007, Week 3
September 2007, Week 2
September 2007, Week 1
August 2007, Week 5
August 2007, Week 4
August 2007, Week 3
August 2007, Week 2
August 2007, Week 1
July 2007, Week 5
July 2007, Week 4
July 2007, Week 3
July 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 1
June 2007, Week 5
June 2007, Week 4
June 2007, Week 3
June 2007, Week 2
June 2007, Week 1
May 2007, Week 5
May 2007, Week 4
May 2007, Week 3
May 2007, Week 2
May 2007, Week 1
April 2007, Week 5
April 2007, Week 4
April 2007, Week 3
April 2007, Week 2
April 2007, Week 1
March 2007, Week 5
March 2007, Week 4
March 2007, Week 3
March 2007, Week 2
March 2007, Week 1
February 2007, Week 4
February 2007, Week 3
February 2007, Week 2
February 2007, Week 1
January 2007, Week 5
January 2007, Week 4
January 2007, Week 3
January 2007, Week 2
January 2007, Week 1
December 2006, Week 5
December 2006, Week 4
December 2006, Week 3
December 2006, Week 2
December 2006, Week 1
November 2006, Week 5
November 2006, Week 4
November 2006, Week 3
November 2006, Week 2
November 2006, Week 1
October 2006, Week 5
October 2006, Week 4
October 2006, Week 3
October 2006, Week 2
October 2006, Week 1
September 2006, Week 5
September 2006, Week 4
September 2006, Week 3
September 2006, Week 2
September 2006, Week 1
August 2006, Week 5
August 2006, Week 4
August 2006, Week 3
August 2006, Week 2
August 2006, Week 1
July 2006, Week 5
July 2006, Week 4
July 2006, Week 3
July 2006, Week 2
July 2006, Week 1
June 2006, Week 5
June 2006, Week 4
June 2006, Week 3
June 2006, Week 2
June 2006, Week 1
May 2006, Week 5
May 2006, Week 4
May 2006, Week 3
May 2006, Week 2
May 2006, Week 1
April 2006, Week 5
April 2006, Week 4
April 2006, Week 3
April 2006, Week 2
April 2006, Week 1
March 2006, Week 5
March 2006, Week 4
March 2006, Week 3
March 2006, Week 2
March 2006, Week 1
February 2006, Week 4
February 2006, Week 3
February 2006, Week 2
February 2006, Week 1
January 2006, Week 5
January 2006, Week 4
January 2006, Week 3
January 2006, Week 2
January 2006, Week 1
December 2005, Week 5
December 2005, Week 4
December 2005, Week 3
December 2005, Week 2
December 2005, Week 1
November 2005, Week 5
November 2005, Week 4
November 2005, Week 3
November 2005, Week 2
November 2005, Week 1
October 2005, Week 5
October 2005, Week 4
October 2005, Week 3
October 2005, Week 2
October 2005, Week 1
September 2005, Week 5
September 2005, Week 4
September 2005, Week 3
September 2005, Week 2
September 2005, Week 1
August 2005, Week 5
August 2005, Week 4
August 2005, Week 3
August 2005, Week 2
August 2005, Week 1
July 2005, Week 5
July 2005, Week 4
July 2005, Week 3
July 2005, Week 2
July 2005, Week 1
June 2005, Week 5
June 2005, Week 4
June 2005, Week 3
June 2005, Week 2
June 2005, Week 1
May 2005, Week 5
May 2005, Week 4
May 2005, Week 3
May 2005, Week 2
May 2005, Week 1
April 2005, Week 5
April 2005, Week 4
April 2005, Week 3
April 2005, Week 2
April 2005, Week 1
March 2005, Week 5
March 2005, Week 4
March 2005, Week 3
March 2005, Week 2
March 2005, Week 1
February 2005, Week 4
February 2005, Week 3
February 2005, Week 2
February 2005, Week 1
January 2005, Week 5
January 2005, Week 4
January 2005, Week 3
January 2005, Week 2
January 2005, Week 1
December 2004, Week 5
December 2004, Week 4
December 2004, Week 3
December 2004, Week 2
December 2004, Week 1
November 2004, Week 5
November 2004, Week 4
November 2004, Week 3
November 2004, Week 2
November 2004, Week 1
October 2004, Week 5
October 2004, Week 4
October 2004, Week 3
October 2004, Week 2
October 2004, Week 1
September 2004, Week 5
September 2004, Week 4
September 2004, Week 3
September 2004, Week 2
September 2004, Week 1
August 2004, Week 5
August 2004, Week 4
August 2004, Week 3
August 2004, Week 2
August 2004, Week 1
July 2004, Week 5
July 2004, Week 4
July 2004, Week 3
July 2004, Week 2
July 2004, Week 1
June 2004, Week 5
June 2004, Week 4
June 2004, Week 3
June 2004, Week 2
June 2004, Week 1
May 2004, Week 5
May 2004, Week 4
May 2004, Week 3
May 2004, Week 2
May 2004, Week 1
April 2004, Week 5
April 2004, Week 4
April 2004, Week 3
April 2004, Week 2
April 2004, Week 1
March 2004, Week 5
March 2004, Week 4
March 2004, Week 3
March 2004, Week 2
March 2004, Week 1
February 2004, Week 5
February 2004, Week 4
February 2004, Week 3
February 2004, Week 2
February 2004, Week 1
January 2004, Week 5
January 2004, Week 4
January 2004, Week 3
January 2004, Week 2
January 2004, Week 1
December 2003, Week 5
December 2003, Week 4
December 2003, Week 3
December 2003, Week 2
December 2003, Week 1
November 2003, Week 5
November 2003, Week 4
November 2003, Week 3
November 2003, Week 2
November 2003, Week 1
October 2003, Week 5
October 2003, Week 4
October 2003, Week 3
October 2003, Week 2
October 2003, Week 1
September 2003, Week 5
September 2003, Week 4
September 2003, Week 3
September 2003, Week 2
September 2003, Week 1
August 2003, Week 5
August 2003, Week 4
August 2003, Week 3
August 2003, Week 2
August 2003, Week 1
July 2003, Week 5
July 2003, Week 4
July 2003, Week 3
July 2003, Week 2
July 2003, Week 1
June 2003, Week 5
June 2003, Week 4
June 2003, Week 3
June 2003, Week 2
June 2003, Week 1
May 2003, Week 5
May 2003, Week 4
May 2003, Week 3
May 2003, Week 2
May 2003, Week 1
April 2003, Week 5
April 2003, Week 4
April 2003, Week 3
April 2003, Week 2
March 2003, Week 5
March 2003, Week 4
March 2003, Week 3
March 2003, Week 2
March 2003, Week 1
February 2003, Week 4
February 2003, Week 3
February 2003, Week 2
February 2003, Week 1
January 2003, Week 5
January 2003, Week 4
January 2003, Week 3
January 2003, Week 2
January 2003, Week 1
December 2002, Week 5
December 2002, Week 4
December 2002, Week 3
December 2002, Week 2
December 2002, Week 1
November 2002, Week 4
November 2002, Week 3
November 2002, Week 2
November 2002, Week 1
October 2002, Week 5
October 2002, Week 4
October 2002, Week 3
October 2002, Week 2
October 2002, Week 1
September 2002, Week 5
September 2002, Week 4
September 2002, Week 3
September 2002, Week 2
September 2002, Week 1
August 2002, Week 5
August 2002, Week 4
August 2002, Week 3
August 2002, Week 2
August 2002, Week 1
July 2002, Week 5
July 2002, Week 4
July 2002, Week 3
July 2002, Week 2
July 2002, Week 1
June 2002, Week 5
June 2002, Week 4
June 2002, Week 3
June 2002, Week 2
June 2002, Week 1
May 2002, Week 5
May 2002, Week 4
May 2002, Week 3
May 2002, Week 2
May 2002, Week 1
April 2002, Week 5
April 2002, Week 4
April 2002, Week 3
April 2002, Week 2
April 2002, Week 1
March 2002, Week 5
March 2002, Week 4
March 2002, Week 3
March 2002, Week 1
February 2002, Week 4
February 2002, Week 3
February 2002, Week 2
February 2002, Week 1
January 2002, Week 5
January 2002, Week 4
January 2002, Week 3
January 2002, Week 2
January 2002, Week 1
December 2001, Week 5
December 2001, Week 4
December 2001, Week 3
December 2001, Week 2
December 2001, Week 1
November 2001, Week 5
November 2001, Week 4
November 2001, Week 3
November 2001, Week 2
November 2001, Week 1
October 2001, Week 5
October 2001, Week 4
October 2001, Week 3
October 2001, Week 2
October 2001, Week 1
September 2001, Week 5
September 2001, Week 4
September 2001, Week 3
September 2001, Week 2
September 2001, Week 1
August 2001, Week 5
August 2001, Week 4
August 2001, Week 3
August 2001, Week 2
August 2001, Week 1
July 2001, Week 5
July 2001, Week 4
July 2001, Week 3
July 2001, Week 2
July 2001, Week 1
June 2001, Week 5
June 2001, Week 4
June 2001, Week 3
June 2001, Week 2
June 2001, Week 1
May 2001, Week 5
May 2001, Week 4
May 2001, Week 3
May 2001, Week 2
May 2001, Week 1
April 2001, Week 5
April 2001, Week 4
April 2001, Week 3
April 2001, Week 2
April 2001, Week 1
March 2001, Week 5
March 2001, Week 4
March 2001, Week 3
March 2001, Week 2
March 2001, Week 1
February 2001, Week 4
February 2001, Week 3
February 2001, Week 2
February 2001, Week 1
January 2001, Week 5
January 2001, Week 4
January 2001, Week 3
January 2001, Week 2
January 2001, Week 1
December 2000, Week 5
December 2000, Week 4
December 2000, Week 3
December 2000, Week 2
December 2000, Week 1
November 2000, Week 5
November 2000, Week 4
November 2000, Week 3
November 2000, Week 2
November 2000, Week 1
October 2000, Week 5
October 2000, Week 4
October 2000, Week 3
October 2000, Week 2
October 2000, Week 1
September 2000, Week 5
September 2000, Week 4
September 2000, Week 3
September 2000, Week 2
September 2000, Week 1
August 2000, Week 5
August 2000, Week 4
August 2000, Week 3
August 2000, Week 2
August 2000, Week 1
July 2000, Week 5
July 2000, Week 4
July 2000, Week 3
July 2000, Week 2
July 2000, Week 1
June 2000, Week 5
June 2000, Week 4
June 2000, Week 3
June 2000, Week 2
June 2000, Week 1
May 2000, Week 5
May 2000, Week 4
May 2000, Week 3
May 2000, Week 2
May 2000, Week 1
April 2000, Week 5
April 2000, Week 4
April 2000, Week 3
April 2000, Week 2
April 2000, Week 1
March 2000, Week 5
March 2000, Week 4
March 2000, Week 3
March 2000, Week 2
March 2000, Week 1
February 2000, Week 5
February 2000, Week 4
February 2000, Week 3
February 2000, Week 2
February 2000, Week 1
January 2000, Week 5
January 2000, Week 4
January 2000, Week 3
January 2000, Week 2
January 2000, Week 1
December 1999, Week 5
December 1999, Week 4
December 1999, Week 3
December 1999, Week 2
December 1999, Week 1
November 1999, Week 5
November 1999, Week 4
November 1999, Week 3
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October 1999, Week 5
October 1999, Week 4
October 1999, Week 3
October 1999, Week 2
October 1999, Week 1
September 1999, Week 5
September 1999, Week 4
September 1999, Week 3
September 1999, Week 2
September 1999, Week 1
August 1999, Week 5
August 1999, Week 4
August 1999, Week 3
August 1999, Week 2
August 1999, Week 1
July 1999, Week 5
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July 1999, Week 3
July 1999, Week 2
July 1999, Week 1
June 1999, Week 5
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June 1999, Week 3
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June 1999, Week 1
May 1999, Week 5
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May 1999, Week 3
May 1999, Week 2
May 1999, Week 1
April 1999, Week 5
April 1999, Week 4
April 1999, Week 3
April 1999, Week 2
April 1999, Week 1
March 1999, Week 5
March 1999, Week 4
March 1999, Week 3
March 1999, Week 2
March 1999, Week 1
February 1999, Week 5
February 1999, Week 4
February 1999, Week 3
February 1999, Week 2
February 1999, Week 1
January 1999, Week 5
January 1999, Week 4
January 1999, Week 3
January 1999, Week 2
January 1999, Week 1
December 1998, Week 5
December 1998, Week 4
December 1998, Week 3
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December 1998, Week 1
November 1998, Week 5
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June 1998, Week 2
June 1998, Week 1
May 1998, Week 5
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May 1998, Week 1
April 1998, Week 5
April 1998, Week 4
April 1998, Week 3
April 1998, Week 2
April 1998, Week 1
March 1998, Week 5
March 1998, Week 4
March 1998, Week 3
March 1998, Week 2
March 1998, Week 1
February 1998, Week 5
February 1998, Week 4
February 1998, Week 3
February 1998, Week 2
February 1998, Week 1
January 1998, Week 5
January 1998, Week 4
January 1998, Week 3
January 1998, Week 2
January 1998, Week 1
December 1997, Week 5
December 1997, Week 4
December 1997, Week 3
December 1997, Week 2
December 1997, Week 1
November 1997, Week 5
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November 1997, Week 3
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November 1997, Week 1
October 1997, Week 5
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March 1997, Week 1
February 1997, Week 5
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February 1997, Week 3
February 1997, Week 2
February 1997, Week 1

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