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TEI-L  May 2008

TEI-L May 2008

Subject:

Re: Question about lb practice

From:

Daniel O'Donnell <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Tue, 6 May 2008 04:39:01 -0600

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On Tue, 2008-05-06 at 09:23 +0100, Lou Burnard wrote:
> Daniel O'Donnell wrote:
> > I have a question: I am encoding texts out of a textbook. The texts are
> > in prose (paragraphs and sentences) but the pages are lineated (it is a
> > second language textbook and the numbers are used to facilitate in-class
> > translation work).
> >
> >   
> I'll bet this text has lists in it, and possibly verse or drama too, so 
> this isn't just a matter of whether or not the start of a <p> should 
> include an <lb/> but also whether or not the start of an <l> or an <sp> 
> or an <item>  might... and then there's the question of how this 
> interacts with the <pb> element.

All very true, Lou. In fact I was just discovering how to encode what is
in essence drama for Ælfric's Colloquy. And I'm keeping track of pb,
though I'll be skipping the poetry for now.
> 
> You say that the line breaks are presentational, but it seems from the 
> sentence above that they are also important because they provide 
> referencing information: they identify locations within the logical 
> structure of the text as well as indicating how to display or format the 
> text.

It is certainly referencing information as that's how students keep up
with the class ("note the noun on line 6 here..."). But if the texts
really are right-justified running prose and the line breaks are the
arbitrary result of the width of the reading surface of the page, would
you describe that as part of the logical structure of the text?

Maybe this is a semantic difference without a distinction, however,
since the same elements would be used with the same effect.

> 
> So to do the job properly you probably need to define in your stylesheet 
> a number of behaviours ("start a new line if you can, or a new page and 
> a new line if at the foot of a page", "add one to the line number 
> counter", "reinitialise the line number counter", etc..)  and then 
> associate groups of them with  groups of elements.  Look ma, troff!

So you'd say that my silly paragraph encoding is just that... that I
should take advantage of the fact that the rhetorical features
represented by p/l/sp have presentational implications, make my style
sheets do some real work, and not do something like my silly encoding.

So 

        <p n="2">Lorem ipsum dolor sit <lb n="4"/>amet 

And not (taking into account Torsten's observation):

        <p n="2"><lb n="3"><space quantity="1" unit="em"/>Lorem ipsum dolor sit <lb n="4"/>amet

Option 1 certainly look less foolish!

-dan
> 
> 
> 
-- 
Daniel Paul O'Donnell, PhD
Associate Professor of English
Director, Digital Medievalist Project http://www.digitalmedievalist.org/
Chair, Text Encoding Initiative http://www.tei-c.org/

Department of English
University of Lethbridge
Lethbridge AB T1K 3M4
Vox +1 403 329-2377
Fax +1 403 382-7191
Email: [log in to unmask]
WWW: http://people.uleth.ca/~daniel.odonnell/

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