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CONLANG  August 2008, Week 3

CONLANG August 2008, Week 3

Subject:

Re: Most common consonant cluster types cross-linguistically

From:

Eldin Raigmore <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 17 Aug 2008 14:09:05 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (121 lines)

(Previously I had referred to
< http://tinyurl.com/5jdxd4 >

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

At the UPSID site,
< http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/index/sounds.html >
has these:

Clusters

Clusters in Tsou
< http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/tsou/tsou.html >

Clusters in Polish
< http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/polish.html >

Voiced+voiceless clusters in Zhu|hõasi
< http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/zhu/zhu.html >

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

< http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/polish.html >
furthermore has these:

Affricates
< 
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/polish.html#anchor1
3848622 >
< 
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/pcombined/polish4.w
av >

Word-internal consonant clusters.
< 
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/polish.html#anchor1
3893712 >
< 
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/pcombined/polish2.w
av >

Word-initial consonant clusters.
< 
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/polish.html#anchor1
3899908 >
< 
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/pcombined/polish3.w
av >

Word-final consonant clusters.
< 
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/polish.html#anchor1
3910232 >
< 
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/pcombined/polish5.w
av >

Clusters across word boundaries.
< 
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/polish.html#anchor1
3914945 >
< 
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/polish/pcombined/polish6.w
av >

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

And that's all I could find about clusters in the UPSID site.

But
< http://web.phonetik.uni-frankfurt.de/upsid_info.html >
has interesting stuff on the frequencies of the various sounds (that is, the 
number of languages that have each sound.).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Most stuff I find about clusters are about language-acquisition, and about 
errors involving clusters.  This pdf
< http://chhs.sdsu.edu/slhs/publications/barlow112.pdf >
is one such example.  It might be worth reading anyway, though; the 
constraints mentioned probably represent that particular professional linguist's 
guesses as to which types of clusters are most common cross-linguistically in 
various positions.

This pdf
< http://chhs.sdsu.edu/slhs/publications/barlow129.pdf >
is another example that may be worth reading.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

< http://www.ling.ohio-state.edu/~gdanelis/OSUWPL55.pdf >
says:
Many have noted language preferences for sequential contrasts. Greenberg 
(1978), for example, gives some crosslinguistic generalizations in terms of 
obstruent consonant clusters:
(6) Contrast in continuancy is favored over its absence:
a) TTV -> FTV, TFV
b) VTT -> VFT, VTF
c) FFV -> FTV, TFV
d) VFF -> VFT, VTF
In (6) T stands for a stop consonant, V for any vowel and F for a fricative 
consonant. (6a) then should be read as a stop + stop (TT) consonant cluster 
before a vowel (V) is less common cross-linguistically than a fricative + stop 
(FT) or a stop + fricative (TF) before a vowel (V). The same applies for 
postvocalic stop clusters as well (6b) and clusters with two fricatives (6c-d). 
According to these cross-linguistic observations, contrast in continuancy 
between adjacent prevocalic obstruent segments is more common than not. 
Notice, that Greenberg does not talk about the perceptibility of such clusters, 
but only about how they pattern quantitatively in the world’s languages9. 
Functional models based on salient acoustic modulations in segment sequences 
have also been proposed to account for the type of generalizations given in 
(6). (Ohala 1992, Wright 1996). These approaches emphasize both the 
inherent qualities of segments and their syntagmatic optimization in terms of 
acoustic salience. For example, [s] is more perceptible than [, and a [t]
before a vowel is more perceptible than a [t] before another stop.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

< http://www.stanford.edu/~anttila/teaching/lsa-2007/lsa-singlish-final.pdf >
might help.

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