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CONLANG  May 2009, Week 2

CONLANG May 2009, Week 2

Subject:

Re: how to tell when you're conlang's complete-an idea

From:

Benct Philip Jonsson <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 14 May 2009 16:45:05 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

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Jörg Rhiemeier skrev:
> Hallo!
>
> On Wed, 13 May 2009 10:52:29 +0200, Benct Philip
> Jonsson wrote:
>
>> On 2009-05-12 Daniel Bowman wrote:
>>> While I don't ever think my language will be
>>> "complete" in the sense that I'll stop
>>> developing it,
>> It has always been my feeling that a conlang
>> which one can not or will not develop any
>> further is a dead conlang, or to put it in
>> positive terms: if 'alive' for a natlang means
>> 'still used for communication'[^1] then 'alive'
>> for a conlang means 'still tinkered with'.
>
> Yes. A conlang is never really "finished", and
> be it just because there are sooooo many things
> to be named in either this world or the
> fictional world the conlang is spoken. A conlang
> on which its author no longer works is indeed
> essentially a dead conlang.

I forgot to include my own footnote, namely that
in a way natlangs with only one speaker still
alive are also in a sense dead before the death of
their last speaker -- or speakers: I read that
some Native North American languages are not used
for communication any more in spite of their last
few speakers being neighbors, because each of them
is not aware of their neighbors' competence in the
language, so they speak English with eachother...
But then in a sense languages like Vegliote or
Ubykh were briefly semi-revived of sorts when
their last speakers communicated with the
linguists recording their competence, even if the
use of the language was not reciprocal. It is an
open question whether a language, nat- or con-,
can really be revived by others -- is it really
the same language when the revivers learn it,
probably incompletely, from texts? -- but I think
one can call it a real revival in three
situations:

1. When a last speaker teaches their language to
    others and they really start communicating in
    the language with the last speaker, even if the
    new speakers are never native speakers in the
    sense that hey already have another L1 and
    perhaps are already adults.

2. When someone learns a language, natlang or
    conlang, from texts but the last speaker(s) or
    the original creator is/are around to ask, or
    ideally to start communicating with. In that
    sense Klingon is a living language even
    if/when Okrand has lost interest and/or ceased
    to work on it: the new learners at least can
    (and have) ask(ed) him about moot points or
    blank spots, though ideally they should also
    communicate with him *in* the language (as I
    hope they have!)

3. When the creator of a conlang goes back to a
    conlang which they has not worked on or cared
    on for a while -- be it weeks, months, years or
    decades, since there will be a true connexion
    in the creator's memory.

Of course this may overlap with between points
(4) and (3) -- an original creator's interest
     in and work on their conlang may be
     rekindled by the interest of others -- but
     properly there is a difference, since the
     life of a natlang *depends* on being used
     for communication, while for a conlang the
     interest and attention of the original
     author *is* the decisive factor, barring
     the unlikely situation that the original
     author has totally forgotten their own
     conlang and has to relearn it from texts!
     The question is whether there is any
     difference between when an author has
     merely ceased to *work* on their language,
     when they have *lost interest* in it and
     when they have *completely ceased to care*
     about their language(s), as I have with the
     auxlangs of my youth.

This goes some way towards answering Herman
Miller's question 'How to tell the difference
between "dead" and "dormant"?' I guess there may
be a difference of opinion on where to draw the
line, but I think that *continuity of mind(s)*
should be ascribed some importance, both with
natlangs and conlangs, since there may be a span
of time between when a last speaker of a natlang
ceases to use the language even for inner
monologue and when they decide or get the chance
to transmit it to others. It's an interesting
question: is it live transmission if someone
learns Ubykh from one of the linguists who worked
with Tevfik Esenç, even if they never used it for
communication?

Also, how does a conlang transmitted to new
speakers differ from a natlang so transmitted?
When, for example, is it OK to coin new morphemes?
Does it take the original author's express
permission or authorization, or merely the lack of
their prohibition? In practice it may however be
wise to refrain from it in either case, unless the
author has expressly laid that authority on some
person(s) or laid down rules for how it should be
done by some democratic process, lest the language
splitls into one incompatible daughter language
per speaker/user! It seems reasonable to suppose
that new compounds or derivations using the
morphemes left by the author are OK if and as long
the meaning of these coinages are readily
understood from the meaning of their parts to
anyone who knows the language as left by the
author. When there is a lack of direct
transmission this becomes even more important,
since then authority can only rest in compliance
to the patterns observable in the corpus left
behind before the language died -- but my whole
point is that I doubt it could be called the same
language when there's no direct transmission.

(Wow, I'm worrying about autentic teacher-to-pupil
transmission! I'm more steeped in Buddhist values
than I'm usually aware of! When it comes to
Buddhist teachings I'm normally not quite
convinced why transmission by text shouldn't be
valid. I obviously have to reconsider that! :-)

>>      To my mind at least conlanging is -- in
>>      spite of its solipsism -- a performing
>>      art. I'm not nearly as thrilled by reading
>>      a grammar of a conlang as of hearing the
>>      stories of how the conlanger discovered
>>      what the grammar looks like, and why.
>>      That's why to me the appropriate term for
>>      the art must be 'language construction',
>>      and the true sense of 'constructed
>>      language is 'language which is being
>>      constructed' rather than 'language which
>>      has been constructed', since the thrill is
>>      in the journey, not in the destination, or
>>      even in the arrival.
>
> Indeed, "the road is the destination". The fun
> in conlanging lies in *making* it, and as long
> as you are *using* it, you are still making it,
> as you will probably run into blank spots in the
> lexicon or the grammar even if your language is
> highly developed. Writing down a grammar sketch
> and a few hundred words can be done in a few
> days, but that will only be the *foundation* of
> the conlang: you *will* run into *lots* of blank
> spots when you start using your conlang.

True, but are we to create a hierarchy of conlangs
and conlangers where those who work on one
language over a long time, and their languages,
are more worth than those who create many sketches
and their creation? I think not; anyone who
creates new linguistic structures is a conlanger,
and any newly created linguistic structure is a
conlang. Sure there attaches an interest and a
respect to a mature conlang, but not so that an
immature conlang lacks interest, respect or value.
Surely the principle of equal value of all
conlangs and conlangers, however (un)developed
the(ir) conlang(s) is fundamental to maintaining
peaceful relations in our community; there is a
definite danger in starting to make *value*
judgments based on volume or persistency of
eachother's work. We may have private and
individual standards of comparison, but we should
keep them private and personal and not try to
impose them on the community. Apart from the
danger to the peace in our community there is
simply no ground upon which to claim objectivity
for a more narrow definition of what a conlang or
a conlanger is; as we all know the ANADEW always
applies, so there isn't even an objective standard
of novelty! (You may say it's like LEGO: you may
build an infinite number of new designs, but
everybody builds from prefabricated blocks --
that's true of any art, IMNSHO!)

>>      This is not to say that it is not a good
>>      thing to have some idea of the
>>      destination, but there should be room for
>>      changing the destination, or rather the
>>      destination is best not too sharply
>>      defined, and one must always be open to
>>      the possibility that one was mistaken
>>      about the destination, or about its true
>>      identity. (I guess I'w talking like a true
>>      Maháyánist here!)
>
> I can only confirm that, looking at the history
> of my Albic project. It started as Nur-ellen, a
> descendant of Tolkien's Sindarin; but it soon
> developed into a completely different direction
> and is now no longer related to Tolkien's
> languages (a few ideas, such as the
> active/stative alignment with degree-of-volition
> marking, have survived, but it tells a lot that
> the surviving features were mostly my own
> invention even in early Nur-ellen).

Do you have *any* feature left which is a
characteristic feature of Sindarin, like lenition?
As well as there is an ANADEW principle there is
also a good case to make for an *A Conlang Already
Dunnit* principle: it would take an agglomeration
of features already found in any one same language
(nat- or con-), and an *absence of features not
found in that same language* to claim plagiarism.
Clearly there is a level of fair use, however
difficult it may be to objectively measure (and
the community will punish any violator with their
disinterest!)

>>       Surely a language continually worked on
>>       through decades will eventually change or
>>       expand less and less, but I think that if
>>       it still holds any interest at all one
>>       will continue to chip on it here and
>>       there at least occasionally. What we can
>>       glean of Tolkien's case history seems to
>>       bear this out. What do you living
>>       practitioners who have worked on the same
>>       languages for decades say?
>
> I haven't worked on the same language for
> decades yet, but even when looking back onto the
> nine years I have been working on what is now
> known as Albic, I recognize that the changes
> have become less and less, with one total start-
> over (when I decided to sever the diachronic
> link to Sindarin) and several major revisions in
> the early years, while the grammar has been
> quite stable (but constantly becoming richer and
> more detailed) since about 2005 or so. But I
> still expect things to change in the future:
> there is still much to be discovered in the
> grammar and the diachronic development, and the
> lexicon badly needs more exploration. And then
> there are daughter and sister languages of Old
> Albic to be discovered ...

A few months back I could have said the same about
Kijeb/Sohlob, but then I'd always known that the
verbal system was a stopgap, and suddenly not so
long ago I had a revelation of how the verbal
system really works -- eight years after the
inception of the lang, not counting its tenuous
roots in the langs of my childhood, that is! I had
a similar revelation of the pronominal system some
four years ago; maybe the lang works in tetrades,
so that I'll get the actual, as opposed to the
stopgap, local case system in 2013. I hope I'll
get it sooner! Between these bursts of revelation
relatively little happens, but I never really lose
*interest* in the Sohlob languages, which is in
the end what counts for me.

>>> I was thinking that one major milestone would
>>> be the ability to define the language in its
>>> own terms.
>> I think a more useful, and truthful, term when
>> talking about conlangs would be _mature_, in
>> the sense of being capable of performing at
>> least a semblance of the communicative
>> functions of a natlang, most notably to be used
>> to compose texts -- on any subject --, and thus
>> also at least potentially being used for
>> conversation, or possessing most of the
>> characteristics of a 'natlang', not only in
>> terms of vocabulary but also in terms of
>> grammatical categories, or historical depth if
>> you are of that bent.
>
> Right. I am aiming at just this kind of maturity
> with Old Albic; perhaps some of its daughters
> will also be developed to maturity later, but
> Old Albic goes first, and I still feel that is
> has come quite close to maturity but not fully
> reached it yet.

To me there is a question both of the maturity of
single languages as synchronic systems, and the
maturity of their diachrony and relation to other
languages -- whether they're part of an apriori
language family or an aposteriori member of a
natlang family, like a romlang, or an aposteriori
relative of someone else's conlang(s) (since I too
have mucked about in Middle-earth, though I have
naught I feel worth daring to reveal!) The goal
here is clearly the ability to write an historical
grammar sufficiently similar to an historical
grammar of a natlang. None of the Sohlob languages
is worth very much considered apart from
eachother, and my romlangs arent much worth if
their development from (Vulgar) Latin and relation
to other (nat)romlangs can be articulated and
reasoned. Here the degree of naturalism in the
proposed changes clearly is an objective standard
of measure -- and the originality of their
combination and arrangement is an equally
important subjective standard of measurement.

>>       This has nothing to do with reaching a
>>       'final form'; IME some conlangs achive
>>       maturity almost at once -- even coming
>>       out of the egg virtually mature in some
>>       cases --,
>
> One example of an "instantly mature" conlang is
> perhaps Germanech, in which I could start
> composing whatever text I liked just right off
> in the beginning, as I could make up words "on
> the fly" just by applying the GMP to Latin words
> and all that. Yet, Germanech lies quite
> neglected, and I haven't done much work on it or
> with it for a few years. It is one of those side
> projects that are waiting indefinitely in my
> mind to be picked up again.

But it still has some presence in your mind,
right?

>>       while others stubbornly resist achieving
>>       maturity, but are very much alive because
>>       they keep attracting their creators'
>>       attention and interest. However it is
>>       probably true that the more stubborn
>>       perpetual fledglings may be more vital in
>>       the sense of maintaining interest and
>>       attention: there is indeed a threat of
>>       death in maturity, unless the language
>>       enters a phase of being used
>>       expressively, since using a language for
>>       communication inevitably entails
>>       tinkering with it; this is true of
>>       natlangs as well!
>
> Yes. Germanech is almost dead because it is
> essentially *finished*; there is not much left
> to explore (other than running yet more words
> through the GMP, but that is more of an
> automatic procedure rather than a creative act
> of exploration). What is left to do on it is
> essentially bookkeeping work.

That's the trouble with aposteriori histlangs: the
GMP *is* the work of art, unless you are able to
also devise interesting and credible (as in "could
this credibly happen in a natlang in that time and
place") morphologic, syntactic and above all
semantic innovations. Some such changes will
inevitably follow from the GMP; the art lies in
spotting those, and in devising other new ones.
Once that is done the attraction of a histlang
lies in its use in a conculture or alternative
history setting.

> The Albic family offers much, much more
> uncharted territory to explore (and then there
> is the notion of "Hesperic" languages, a larger
> family of which Albic is just a branch, and
> which I am not sure about whether those
> languages will exist at all - but I already have
> some ideas about them, and will probably do them
> later); if I compare Old Albic to Germanech, I
> must say that Germanech is more *mature*, but
> Old Albic is definitely more *alive*!

Exactly. In a sense the aliveness of a conlang is
a function of how interesting its uncharted
territories are (or how clever/original/exotic its
charted territory is. Exoticness is a double-edged
sword, however, balancing on the point of
credibility.

>>> This means being capable of writing the
>>> grammar down actually in the language in
>>> question, and also being able to define every
>>> word in the language in terms of other words
>>> from the same language.
>> I guess I could do that with Mærik, but then
>> Mærik is possibly the deadest of all my
>> conlangs: coming almost mature out of the egg
>> in a flash of inspiration, and assigned the
>> rôle of a Relay language from the start.
>
> I could write a grammar of Germanech in
> Germanech with few difficulties; however, I am
> much more interested in writing a grammar of Old
> Albic in Old Albic - but for that, Old Albic is
> not yet mature enough.
>
>>       Yet there are big white areas on the map,
>>       particularly in the area of of syntax,
>>       and they periodically cry to be unveiled,
>>       or spontaneously unveil themselves, and
>>       the largely unanswered question of *who*
>>       spoke that language still makes itself
>>       heard whenever I look at the language,
>>       and that too has repercussions on the
>>       language
>
> Indeed, to feel really "alive" a conlang needs
> some sort of concultural background. This is
> fairly well-developed for Old Albic, though
> there is still much to explore yet in that
> domain; it is more sketchy with Germanech, but
> even there I know who speaks the language.

I have an idea who the speakers of Mærik *may*
be, but I'm surely not sure. The concept of the
Hackers holds the threat of descending into
Hobbitry, and that territory has as we all know
been better charted by another than I could ever
hope for, even though my vision would certainly
be darker.

>>       -- particularly the vocabulary, which was
>>       created with computational assitance,
>>       meaning that I frequently feel that a
>>       given word-meaning association is not
>>       correct.
>
> I do not use computer-generated words at all in
> Old Albic for just that reason: the words have
> to feel *right*, and that is only possible, it
> seems to me, if I create the words manually in a
> creative process.

Computer generated vocabulary (CGV?) surely holds
a threat, but that too is a two-edged sword. The
benefit is that you get some substance to work
with: having something to reject helps me to
decide what to adopt. The same as with having
stopgap morphology having however stopgap a
vocabulary makes it possible to compose texts, and
it is only through *using* words I can decide if
they are right or wrong -- if, as Tolkien said,
sound and meaning *fit*. Besides there is the
curious fact that *contra* Tolkien ("call [_sky_]
_jibberjabber_, or anything else that comes into
your head without any exercise of any linguistic
taste or art. But that's code-making, not language-
building."[_The Notion Club Papers_, p. 239-240 of
_Sauron Defeated/History of Middle-earth, vol. 9])
CGV more often than one would expect -- more
often, I'm tempted to say, than what could be mere
chance -- *has* a sense of fit! This is, I must
make clear, not a matter of the hand of fate
touching the computer's random number generator,
but a function of the CGV being generated in
accordance with a phonemic inventory and -- even
more important -- phonotactics which are
themselves the result of an exercise of linguistic
taste and art. In an analog to painting the
generator is the brush (and itself a work of art,
or at least craft, the quality of which determines
the worth of the brush), but it's still I who
choose the colors, and I constrain, if not
control, the movements of the brush. In exercising
art and taste when designing the constraints on
the generator I exercise more control than does
the painter who 'paints' blindfolded or by
smearing paint on snails and letting them crawl
around on the canvas as a (deliberately choosen)
artistic technique. I don't let the computer
randomly pile letters on each other: what is
randomly selected are valid sequences of phonemes
(or graphemes), and what is valid sequences has
been decided in an exercise of taste and art. I
have more control than the snail-painter, for I
control both the phoneme inventory and the
phonotactics, while he controls only the choice of
colors and not the crawling of the snails. What
the generator in fact gives me is a list of
(perhaps all) possible syllables/roots/words of
the conlang according to the phonomes and
phonotactics I've designed. The cheat lies in
letting the computer randomly collocate shapes
from that list with meanings, but I (a) have never
claimed those associations to be anything other
than tentative, as open to revision as any aspect
of a conlang, and (b) without it I'd waver around
in the blue catching a useable (let alone fitting)
association of sound and meaning only once in a
blue moon: my own indecision would hinder me from
even making a makeshift association, and I would
be precluded from ever using my conlang for
composition. Besides my usual _modus operandi_
isn't entirely random: I let the computer suggest
a handful of words from the total list of (yet
unused) possible words, and then I either choose
one from the handful or call up a new handful, the
optional rejection also being an expression and
exercise of linguistic taste and art. Only very
occasionally is my indecision so acute that I must
allow the computer choose one candidate. And still
I can imagine a painter throwing dice to decide
what color or width of brush to use, or an Eastern
calligrapher using dice to decide which of the
traditional strokes to use next -- thus composing
new Hanzi from strokes, which with or without dice
would be a form of conscripting! Would that be
cheating, or would the dice -- chance -- be an
artistic tool, and so the decision to use them be
a choice of artistic expression? Surely the
potential of using chance to help artists to find
configurations of their materials (and meanings,
or patterns of meaning are plainly one of
conlangers' materials, on a par with phonemes and
phonologic, morphologic and syntactic patterns)
which they might otherwise have overlooked should
not be dismissed out of hand!?

>>       (Which however does all too seldom mean
>>       that I know which association would be
>>       correct: that -- the central part for
>>       Tolkien -- is the hardest part for me,
>>       while I can almost effertlessly paint
>>       canvases of (historical) phonology, and
>>       with grammar falling somewhat in between.
>>       The problem is that my spontaneous
>>       vocable creations tend to be too alike,
>>       lacking in indviduality, more expressive
>>       of phonotactics than of wordness.)
>
> Same to me! I can easily make up interesting
> sound changes, and grammar is also rather easy,
> but finding words that sound right is a problem,
> and it is that aspect that is most lacking in
> Old Albic. (With Germanech, this problem is much
> smaller because the words fall out ready-to-use,
> modulo some minor semantic shifts, from the
> Grand Master Plan.)
>

I think you might find having a list of all
possible roots/stems/words helpful, even if you
don't use chance as an aid to choose among them.

>>       Also Mærik has, uncharacteristically for
>>       me, almost no con-history: almost the
>>       only thing I know is that here has been
>>       i-umlaut and apocope, but that's only
>>       because of the synchronic reflexes of
>>       those processes are visible.
>
> I feel that a conlang, in order to feel alive
> and "real", needs an elaborate con-history.

I'm 100% with you on that. Histlang(er)s are
definitely an important subgroup of artlang(er)s,
and we all know who our patron is! :-)

> With Germanech, the diachronic development from
> Latin codified in the GMP provides such a
> history;

In my opinion, as I said above, with such a
language the GMP *is* the work of art!

> with Albic, I am working on Old Albic and its
> ancestor Proto-Albic (intrafictionally, Old
> Albic is the oldest attested Albic language, and
> Proto-Albic the reconstructed common ancestor of
> all Albic languages), and even on the prehistory
> of Proto-Albic all the way back to Proto-
> Europic, the common ancestor of Albic and Indo-
> European which I reconstruct internally from PIE
> (this involves some actually comparative
> reconstruction work, as I am reluctant to change
> Albic more than necessary in order to make it
> fit with Indo-European).

I actually worked backwards from Classical Sohlob
to Kijeb, and then downwards-sideways from the two
to Kidilib. The exercise was to create a credible
and taste-satisfying sequence of sound changes
which could take me backwards from CS to something
which was an expression of my "linguistic taste
and art". It wasn't entirely possible, so that
Kijeb ended up being the direct ancestor of
Kidilib, but only an aunt of CS. Since then I've
worked both backwards towards proto-Sohlob and
forwards towards the other Sohlob languages, which
is a simultaneous process, since not all of them
are direct descendants of Kijeb; i need to
(re)construct both the sisters and the mother of
Kijeb. The languages shown in bold in family tree

<http://wiki.frath.net/images/d/d2/Sohlob_languag-
es_family_tree.png>

are actually those which have been worked out to
any greater degree.

I don't however, intend or expect to connect
Sohlob to any natlang, living, dead, attested or
unattested. It's even far from sure that it's
spoken on Earth -- this one or a parallel --, and
if not the speakers are probably not human, though
human-like.

>> Granted the writing of a Mærik grammar would
>> have to be _in character_: a medieval monk
>> working through his Donat and giving the Mærik
>> equivalents of its categories, with native
>> speaker intuition breaking the mold only
>> occasionaly. I wonder what he'd make of
>> inclusive and exclusive plural? What would he
>> call them in Scholastic Latin? I guess he'd
>> seize on the fact that the inclusive sort of
>> refers to both the first and second person and
>> call it _pluralis utrarumque personarum_. In
>> fact I doubt he'd write a grammar *in Mærik*.
>
> He'd probably write it in Latin.

He'd definitely write it in Latin, and probably in
rather poor Latin: it struck me after sending the
above, that IIRC _uterque_ has no plural!

>
> What regards the Old Albic grammar I am
> intending to write in Old Albic itself, I am
> going to write it in character: what I already
> know is that there was a grammarian in the
> classical era of the Elvish civilization who
> indeed wrote a grammar of his native language.

I also know that there were Sohloçan philologists
and grammarians, their original motivation being
similar to that of the Hindu grammarians: they had
an inscription in Kijeb which they (correctly)
believed to be the oldest attested text of some
important hymns, and they set out to decipher it
in order to restore the original meaning of the
text, little expecting at first to find a very
different version of their language, and not only
a text in their own language disguised in another
script, as they originally supposed, so unlike the
Indians they got a sense of linguistic history in
the bargain, though they only gradually realized
how much was difference in language and not only
difference in script, since both scripts were
phonemically underspecified.

/BP 8^)>
-- 
Benct Philip Jonsson -- melroch atte melroch dotte se
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  "C'est en vain que nos Josués littéraires crient
  à la langue de s'arrêter; les langues ni le soleil
  ne s'arrêtent plus. Le jour où elles se *fixent*,
  c'est qu'elles meurent."           (Victor Hugo)

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May 2019, Week 5
May 2019, Week 4
May 2019, Week 3
May 2019, Week 2
May 2019, Week 1
April 2019, Week 5
April 2019, Week 4
April 2019, Week 3
April 2019, Week 2
April 2019, Week 1
March 2019, Week 5
March 2019, Week 4
March 2019, Week 3
March 2019, Week 2
March 2019, Week 1
February 2019, Week 4
February 2019, Week 3
February 2019, Week 2
February 2019, Week 1
January 2019, Week 5
January 2019, Week 4
January 2019, Week 3
January 2019, Week 2
January 2019, Week 1
December 2018, Week 5
December 2018, Week 4
December 2018, Week 3
December 2018, Week 2
December 2018, Week 1
November 2018, Week 5
November 2018, Week 4
November 2018, Week 3
November 2018, Week 2
November 2018, Week 1
October 2018, Week 5
October 2018, Week 4
October 2018, Week 3
October 2018, Week 2
October 2018, Week 1
September 2018, Week 5
September 2018, Week 4
September 2018, Week 3
September 2018, Week 2
September 2018, Week 1
August 2018, Week 5
August 2018, Week 4
August 2018, Week 3
August 2018, Week 2
August 2018, Week 1
July 2018, Week 5
July 2018, Week 4
July 2018, Week 3
July 2018, Week 2
July 2018, Week 1
June 2018, Week 5
June 2018, Week 4
June 2018, Week 3
June 2018, Week 2
June 2018, Week 1
May 2018, Week 5
May 2018, Week 4
May 2018, Week 3
May 2018, Week 2
May 2018, Week 1
April 2018, Week 5
April 2018, Week 4
April 2018, Week 3
April 2018, Week 2
April 2018, Week 1
March 2018, Week 5
March 2018, Week 4
March 2018, Week 3
March 2018, Week 2
March 2018, Week 1
February 2018, Week 4
February 2018, Week 3
February 2018, Week 2
February 2018, Week 1
January 2018, Week 5
January 2018, Week 4
January 2018, Week 3
January 2018, Week 2
January 2018, Week 1
December 2017, Week 5
December 2017, Week 4
December 2017, Week 3
December 2017, Week 2
December 2017, Week 1
November 2017, Week 5
November 2017, Week 4
November 2017, Week 3
November 2017, Week 2
November 2017, Week 1
October 2017, Week 5
October 2017, Week 4
October 2017, Week 3
October 2017, Week 2
October 2017, Week 1
September 2017, Week 5
September 2017, Week 4
September 2017, Week 3
September 2017, Week 2
September 2017, Week 1
August 2017, Week 5
August 2017, Week 4
August 2017, Week 3
August 2017, Week 2
August 2017, Week 1
July 2017, Week 5
July 2017, Week 4
July 2017, Week 3
July 2017, Week 2
July 2017, Week 1
June 2017, Week 5
June 2017, Week 4
June 2017, Week 3
June 2017, Week 2
June 2017, Week 1
May 2017, Week 5
May 2017, Week 4
May 2017, Week 3
May 2017, Week 2
May 2017, Week 1
April 2017, Week 5
April 2017, Week 4
April 2017, Week 3
April 2017, Week 2
April 2017, Week 1
March 2017, Week 5
March 2017, Week 4
March 2017, Week 3
March 2017, Week 2
March 2017, Week 1
February 2017, Week 4
February 2017, Week 3
February 2017, Week 2
February 2017, Week 1
January 2017, Week 4
January 2017, Week 3
January 2017, Week 2
January 2017, Week 1
December 2016, Week 5
December 2016, Week 4
December 2016, Week 3
December 2016, Week 2
December 2016, Week 1
November 2016, Week 5
November 2016, Week 4
November 2016, Week 3
November 2016, Week 2
November 2016, Week 1
October 2016, Week 5
October 2016, Week 4
October 2016, Week 3
October 2016, Week 2
October 2016, Week 1
September 2016, Week 5
September 2016, Week 4
September 2016, Week 3
September 2016, Week 2
September 2016, Week 1
August 2016, Week 5
August 2016, Week 4
August 2016, Week 3
August 2016, Week 2
August 2016, Week 1
July 2016, Week 5
July 2016, Week 4
July 2016, Week 3
July 2016, Week 2
July 2016, Week 1
June 2016, Week 5
June 2016, Week 4
June 2016, Week 3
June 2016, Week 2
June 2016, Week 1
May 2016, Week 5
May 2016, Week 4
May 2016, Week 3
May 2016, Week 2
May 2016, Week 1
April 2016, Week 5
April 2016, Week 4
April 2016, Week 3
April 2016, Week 2
April 2016, Week 1
March 2016, Week 5
March 2016, Week 4
March 2016, Week 3
March 2016, Week 2
March 2016, Week 1
February 2016, Week 5
February 2016, Week 4
February 2016, Week 3
February 2016, Week 2
February 2016, Week 1
January 2016, Week 5
January 2016, Week 4
January 2016, Week 3
January 2016, Week 2
January 2016, Week 1
December 2015, Week 5
December 2015, Week 4
December 2015, Week 3
December 2015, Week 2
December 2015, Week 1
November 2015, Week 5
November 2015, Week 4
November 2015, Week 3
November 2015, Week 2
November 2015, Week 1
October 2015, Week 5
October 2015, Week 4
October 2015, Week 3
October 2015, Week 2
October 2015, Week 1
September 2015, Week 5
September 2015, Week 4
September 2015, Week 3
September 2015, Week 2
September 2015, Week 1
August 2015, Week 5
August 2015, Week 4
August 2015, Week 3
August 2015, Week 2
August 2015, Week 1
July 2015, Week 5
July 2015, Week 4
July 2015, Week 3
July 2015, Week 2
July 2015, Week 1
June 2015, Week 5
June 2015, Week 4
June 2015, Week 3
June 2015, Week 2
June 2015, Week 1
May 2015, Week 5
May 2015, Week 4
May 2015, Week 3
May 2015, Week 2
May 2015, Week 1
April 2015, Week 5
April 2015, Week 4
April 2015, Week 3
April 2015, Week 2
April 2015, Week 1
March 2015, Week 5
March 2015, Week 4
March 2015, Week 3
March 2015, Week 2
March 2015, Week 1
February 2015, Week 4
February 2015, Week 3
February 2015, Week 2
February 2015, Week 1
January 2015, Week 5
January 2015, Week 4
January 2015, Week 3
January 2015, Week 2
January 2015, Week 1
December 2014, Week 5
December 2014, Week 4
December 2014, Week 3
December 2014, Week 2
December 2014, Week 1
November 2014, Week 5
November 2014, Week 4
November 2014, Week 3
November 2014, Week 2
November 2014, Week 1
October 2014, Week 5
October 2014, Week 4
October 2014, Week 3
October 2014, Week 2
October 2014, Week 1
September 2014, Week 5
September 2014, Week 4
September 2014, Week 3
September 2014, Week 2
September 2014, Week 1
August 2014, Week 5
August 2014, Week 4
August 2014, Week 3
August 2014, Week 2
August 2014, Week 1
July 2014, Week 5
July 2014, Week 4
July 2014, Week 3
July 2014, Week 2
July 2014, Week 1
June 2014, Week 5
June 2014, Week 4
June 2014, Week 3
June 2014, Week 2
June 2014, Week 1
May 2014, Week 5
May 2014, Week 4
May 2014, Week 3
May 2014, Week 2
May 2014, Week 1
April 2014, Week 5
April 2014, Week 4
April 2014, Week 3
April 2014, Week 2
April 2014, Week 1
March 2014, Week 5
March 2014, Week 4
March 2014, Week 3
March 2014, Week 2
March 2014, Week 1
February 2014, Week 4
February 2014, Week 3
February 2014, Week 2
February 2014, Week 1
January 2014, Week 5
January 2014, Week 4
January 2014, Week 3
January 2014, Week 2
January 2014, Week 1
December 2013, Week 5
December 2013, Week 4
December 2013, Week 3
December 2013, Week 2
December 2013, Week 1
November 2013, Week 5
November 2013, Week 4
November 2013, Week 3
November 2013, Week 2
November 2013, Week 1
October 2013, Week 5
October 2013, Week 4
October 2013, Week 3
October 2013, Week 2
October 2013, Week 1
September 2013, Week 5
September 2013, Week 4
September 2013, Week 3
September 2013, Week 2
September 2013, Week 1
August 2013, Week 5
August 2013, Week 4
August 2013, Week 3
August 2013, Week 2
August 2013, Week 1
July 2013, Week 5
July 2013, Week 4
July 2013, Week 3
July 2013, Week 2
July 2013, Week 1
June 2013, Week 5
June 2013, Week 4
June 2013, Week 3
June 2013, Week 2
June 2013, Week 1
May 2013, Week 5
May 2013, Week 4
May 2013, Week 3
May 2013, Week 2
May 2013, Week 1
April 2013, Week 5
April 2013, Week 4
April 2013, Week 3
April 2013, Week 2
April 2013, Week 1
March 2013, Week 5
March 2013, Week 4
March 2013, Week 3
March 2013, Week 2
March 2013, Week 1
February 2013, Week 4
February 2013, Week 3
February 2013, Week 2
February 2013, Week 1
January 2013, Week 5
January 2013, Week 4
January 2013, Week 3
January 2013, Week 2
January 2013, Week 1
December 2012, Week 5
December 2012, Week 4
December 2012, Week 3
December 2012, Week 2
December 2012, Week 1
November 2012, Week 5
November 2012, Week 4
November 2012, Week 3
November 2012, Week 2
November 2012, Week 1
October 2012, Week 5
October 2012, Week 4
October 2012, Week 3
October 2012, Week 2
October 2012, Week 1
September 2012, Week 5
September 2012, Week 4
September 2012, Week 3
September 2012, Week 2
September 2012, Week 1
August 2012, Week 5
August 2012, Week 4
August 2012, Week 3
August 2012, Week 2
August 2012, Week 1
July 2012, Week 5
July 2012, Week 4
July 2012, Week 3
July 2012, Week 2
July 2012, Week 1
June 2012, Week 5
June 2012, Week 4
June 2012, Week 3
June 2012, Week 2
June 2012, Week 1
May 2012, Week 5
May 2012, Week 4
May 2012, Week 3
May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 5
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 5
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 5
January 2012, Week 4
January 2012, Week 3
January 2012, Week 2
January 2012, Week 1
December 2011, Week 5
December 2011, Week 4
December 2011, Week 3
December 2011, Week 2
December 2011, Week 1
November 2011, Week 5
November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
October 2011, Week 5
October 2011, Week 4
October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
August 2011, Week 5
August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 5
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 5
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 5
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 5
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 4
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 5
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007, Week 5
December 2007, Week 4
December 2007, Week 3
December 2007, Week 2
December 2007, Week 1
November 2007, Week 5
November 2007, Week 4
November 2007, Week 3
November 2007, Week 2
November 2007, Week 1
October 2007, Week 5
October 2007, Week 4
October 2007, Week 3
October 2007, Week 2
October 2007, Week 1
September 2007, Week 5
September 2007, Week 4
September 2007, Week 3
September 2007, Week 2
September 2007, Week 1
August 2007, Week 5
August 2007, Week 4
August 2007, Week 3
August 2007, Week 2
August 2007, Week 1
July 2007, Week 5
July 2007, Week 4
July 2007, Week 3
July 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 1
June 2007, Week 5
June 2007, Week 4
June 2007, Week 3
June 2007, Week 2
June 2007, Week 1
May 2007, Week 5
May 2007, Week 4
May 2007, Week 3
May 2007, Week 2
May 2007, Week 1
April 2007, Week 5
April 2007, Week 4
April 2007, Week 3
April 2007, Week 2
April 2007, Week 1
March 2007, Week 5
March 2007, Week 4
March 2007, Week 3
March 2007, Week 2
March 2007, Week 1
February 2007, Week 4
February 2007, Week 3
February 2007, Week 2
February 2007, Week 1
January 2007, Week 5
January 2007, Week 4
January 2007, Week 3
January 2007, Week 2
January 2007, Week 1
December 2006, Week 5
December 2006, Week 4
December 2006, Week 3
December 2006, Week 2
December 2006, Week 1
November 2006, Week 5
November 2006, Week 4
November 2006, Week 3
November 2006, Week 2
November 2006, Week 1
October 2006, Week 5
October 2006, Week 4
October 2006, Week 3
October 2006, Week 2
October 2006, Week 1
September 2006, Week 5
September 2006, Week 4
September 2006, Week 3
September 2006, Week 2
September 2006, Week 1
August 2006, Week 5
August 2006, Week 4
August 2006, Week 3
August 2006, Week 2
August 2006, Week 1
July 2006, Week 5
July 2006, Week 4
July 2006, Week 3
July 2006, Week 2
July 2006, Week 1
June 2006, Week 5
June 2006, Week 4
June 2006, Week 3
June 2006, Week 2
June 2006, Week 1
May 2006, Week 5
May 2006, Week 4
May 2006, Week 3
May 2006, Week 2
May 2006, Week 1
April 2006, Week 5
April 2006, Week 4
April 2006, Week 3
April 2006, Week 2
April 2006, Week 1
March 2006, Week 5
March 2006, Week 4
March 2006, Week 3
March 2006, Week 2
March 2006, Week 1
February 2006, Week 4
February 2006, Week 3
February 2006, Week 2
February 2006, Week 1
January 2006, Week 5
January 2006, Week 4
January 2006, Week 3
January 2006, Week 2
January 2006, Week 1
December 2005, Week 5
December 2005, Week 4
December 2005, Week 3
December 2005, Week 2
December 2005, Week 1
November 2005, Week 5
November 2005, Week 4
November 2005, Week 3
November 2005, Week 2
November 2005, Week 1
October 2005, Week 5
October 2005, Week 4
October 2005, Week 3
October 2005, Week 2
October 2005, Week 1
September 2005, Week 5
September 2005, Week 4
September 2005, Week 3
September 2005, Week 2
September 2005, Week 1
August 2005, Week 5
August 2005, Week 4
August 2005, Week 3
August 2005, Week 2
August 2005, Week 1
July 2005, Week 5
July 2005, Week 4
July 2005, Week 3
July 2005, Week 2
July 2005, Week 1
June 2005, Week 5
June 2005, Week 4
June 2005, Week 3
June 2005, Week 2
June 2005, Week 1
May 2005, Week 5
May 2005, Week 4
May 2005, Week 3
May 2005, Week 2
May 2005, Week 1
April 2005, Week 5
April 2005, Week 4
April 2005, Week 3
April 2005, Week 2
April 2005, Week 1
March 2005, Week 5
March 2005, Week 4
March 2005, Week 3
March 2005, Week 2
March 2005, Week 1
February 2005, Week 4
February 2005, Week 3
February 2005, Week 2
February 2005, Week 1
January 2005, Week 5
January 2005, Week 4
January 2005, Week 3
January 2005, Week 2
January 2005, Week 1
December 2004, Week 5
December 2004, Week 4
December 2004, Week 3
December 2004, Week 2
December 2004, Week 1
November 2004, Week 5
November 2004, Week 4
November 2004, Week 3
November 2004, Week 2
November 2004, Week 1
October 2004, Week 5
October 2004, Week 4
October 2004, Week 3
October 2004, Week 2
October 2004, Week 1
September 2004, Week 5
September 2004, Week 4
September 2004, Week 3
September 2004, Week 2
September 2004, Week 1
August 2004, Week 5
August 2004, Week 4
August 2004, Week 3
August 2004, Week 2
August 2004, Week 1
July 2004, Week 5
July 2004, Week 4
July 2004, Week 3
July 2004, Week 2
July 2004, Week 1
June 2004, Week 5
June 2004, Week 4
June 2004, Week 3
June 2004, Week 2
June 2004, Week 1
May 2004, Week 5
May 2004, Week 4
May 2004, Week 3
May 2004, Week 2
May 2004, Week 1
April 2004, Week 5
April 2004, Week 4
April 2004, Week 3
April 2004, Week 2
April 2004, Week 1
March 2004, Week 5
March 2004, Week 4
March 2004, Week 3
March 2004, Week 2
March 2004, Week 1
February 2004, Week 5
February 2004, Week 4
February 2004, Week 3
February 2004, Week 2
February 2004, Week 1
January 2004, Week 5
January 2004, Week 4
January 2004, Week 3
January 2004, Week 2
January 2004, Week 1
December 2003, Week 5
December 2003, Week 4
December 2003, Week 3
December 2003, Week 2
December 2003, Week 1
November 2003, Week 5
November 2003, Week 4
November 2003, Week 3
November 2003, Week 2
November 2003, Week 1
October 2003, Week 5
October 2003, Week 4
October 2003, Week 3
October 2003, Week 2
October 2003, Week 1
September 2003, Week 5
September 2003, Week 4
September 2003, Week 3
September 2003, Week 2
September 2003, Week 1
August 2003, Week 5
August 2003, Week 4
August 2003, Week 3
August 2003, Week 2
August 2003, Week 1
July 2003, Week 5
July 2003, Week 4
July 2003, Week 3
July 2003, Week 2
July 2003, Week 1
June 2003, Week 5
June 2003, Week 4
June 2003, Week 3
June 2003, Week 2
June 2003, Week 1
May 2003, Week 5
May 2003, Week 4
May 2003, Week 3
May 2003, Week 2
May 2003, Week 1
April 2003, Week 5
April 2003, Week 4
April 2003, Week 3
April 2003, Week 2
April 2003, Week 1
March 2003, Week 5
March 2003, Week 4
March 2003, Week 3
March 2003, Week 2
March 2003, Week 1
February 2003, Week 4
February 2003, Week 3
February 2003, Week 2
February 2003, Week 1
January 2003, Week 5
January 2003, Week 4
January 2003, Week 3
January 2003, Week 2
January 2003, Week 1
December 2002, Week 5
December 2002, Week 4
December 2002, Week 3
December 2002, Week 2
December 2002, Week 1
November 2002, Week 5
November 2002, Week 4
November 2002, Week 3
November 2002, Week 2
November 2002, Week 1
October 2002, Week 5
October 2002, Week 4
October 2002, Week 3
October 2002, Week 2
October 2002, Week 1
September 2002, Week 5
September 2002, Week 4
September 2002, Week 3
September 2002, Week 2
September 2002, Week 1
August 2002, Week 5
August 2002, Week 4
August 2002, Week 3
August 2002, Week 2
August 2002, Week 1
July 2002, Week 5
July 2002, Week 4
July 2002, Week 3
July 2002, Week 2
July 2002, Week 1
June 2002, Week 5
June 2002, Week 4
June 2002, Week 3
June 2002, Week 2
June 2002, Week 1
May 2002, Week 5
May 2002, Week 4
May 2002, Week 3
May 2002, Week 2
May 2002, Week 1
April 2002, Week 5
April 2002, Week 4
April 2002, Week 3
April 2002, Week 2
April 2002, Week 1
March 2002, Week 5
March 2002, Week 4
March 2002, Week 3
March 2002, Week 2
March 2002, Week 1
February 2002, Week 4
February 2002, Week 3
February 2002, Week 2
February 2002, Week 1
January 2002, Week 5
January 2002, Week 4
January 2002, Week 3
January 2002, Week 2
January 2002, Week 1
December 2001, Week 5
December 2001, Week 4
December 2001, Week 3
December 2001, Week 2
December 2001, Week 1
November 2001, Week 5
November 2001, Week 4
November 2001, Week 3
November 2001, Week 2
November 2001, Week 1
October 2001, Week 5
October 2001, Week 4
October 2001, Week 3
October 2001, Week 2
October 2001, Week 1
September 2001, Week 5
September 2001, Week 4
September 2001, Week 3
September 2001, Week 2
September 2001, Week 1
August 2001, Week 5
August 2001, Week 4
August 2001, Week 3
August 2001, Week 2
August 2001, Week 1
July 2001, Week 5
July 2001, Week 4
July 2001, Week 3
July 2001, Week 2
July 2001, Week 1
June 2001, Week 5
June 2001, Week 4
June 2001, Week 3
June 2001, Week 2
June 2001, Week 1
May 2001, Week 5
May 2001, Week 4
May 2001, Week 3
May 2001, Week 2
May 2001, Week 1
April 2001, Week 5
April 2001, Week 4
April 2001, Week 3
April 2001, Week 2
April 2001, Week 1
March 2001, Week 5
March 2001, Week 4
March 2001, Week 3
March 2001, Week 2
March 2001, Week 1
February 2001, Week 4
February 2001, Week 3
February 2001, Week 2
February 2001, Week 1
January 2001, Week 5
January 2001, Week 4
January 2001, Week 3
January 2001, Week 2
January 2001, Week 1
December 2000, Week 5
December 2000, Week 4
December 2000, Week 3
December 2000, Week 2
December 2000, Week 1
November 2000, Week 5
November 2000, Week 4
November 2000, Week 3
November 2000, Week 2
November 2000, Week 1
October 2000, Week 5
October 2000, Week 4
October 2000, Week 3
October 2000, Week 2
October 2000, Week 1
September 2000, Week 5
September 2000, Week 4
September 2000, Week 3
September 2000, Week 2
September 2000, Week 1
August 2000, Week 5
August 2000, Week 4
August 2000, Week 3
August 2000, Week 2
August 2000, Week 1
July 2000, Week 5
July 2000, Week 4
July 2000, Week 3
July 2000, Week 2
July 2000, Week 1
June 2000, Week 5
June 2000, Week 4
June 2000, Week 3
June 2000, Week 2
June 2000, Week 1
May 2000, Week 5
May 2000, Week 4
May 2000, Week 3
May 2000, Week 2
May 2000, Week 1
April 2000, Week 5
April 2000, Week 4
April 2000, Week 3
April 2000, Week 2
April 2000, Week 1
March 2000, Week 5
March 2000, Week 4
March 2000, Week 3
March 2000, Week 2
March 2000, Week 1
February 2000, Week 5
February 2000, Week 4
February 2000, Week 3
February 2000, Week 2
February 2000, Week 1
January 2000, Week 5
January 2000, Week 4
January 2000, Week 3
January 2000, Week 2
January 2000, Week 1
December 1999, Week 5
December 1999, Week 4
December 1999, Week 3
December 1999, Week 2
December 1999, Week 1
November 1999, Week 5
November 1999, Week 4
November 1999, Week 3
November 1999, Week 2
November 1999, Week 1
October 1999, Week 5
October 1999, Week 4
October 1999, Week 3
October 1999, Week 2
October 1999, Week 1
September 1999, Week 5
September 1999, Week 4
September 1999, Week 3
September 1999, Week 2
September 1999, Week 1
August 1999, Week 5
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