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CONLANG  August 2009, Week 3

CONLANG August 2009, Week 3

Subject:

Re: Postman Pat

From:

TOms Deimonds Barvidis <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 17 Aug 2009 22:35:52 +0300

Content-Type:

text/plain

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Quoting Philip Newton <[log in to unmask]>:
> How would you address a letter or a postcard in your conlang --
> especially if there's a conworld to go with it?

I haven't really thought about it.

> Three things I'm thinking of especially:
> 
> - Some (language, country) combinations order addresses from smallest
> to biggest (e.g. England, Germany: name, street, city) whiel others
> order them from biggest to smallest (e.g. Russia, Hungary: city,
> street, name). What do you do?

It would probably go like Empire/Country; District/Region/Federal State/; 
City/Town/Village/; Street (or, perhaps, name of the house); the name of receiver.

> - Different countries include varying amounts of information in
> addresses. For example, some countries have postal codes, while others
> (e.g. Ireland) do not. 

My conworld will definitely NOT have any postal codes, at least as far as I have yet 
invented it. Maybe, some day in the future some countries will have postal codes.  

Some countries add a unit between city and
> country (e.g. state/province/county), others don't.

My conlangs probably wouldn't.

> - For those of you with inflected languages: what cases are your
> addresses in? For example, I believe Russian uses nominative for the
> address part but dative for the addressee's name (because the letter
> is _for_ him or is sent _to_ him).

In Longrimol, address would stay case-unmarked, while the addressee would receive 
a dative article. 
 
>addresses in Russian being in
> the nominative is only half right, since (AIUI) street names are
> typically in the genitive after the word "street", e.g.
> "John Smith's
> Street" or "Street of the Red Army" rather than "John
> Smith Street" or
> "Red Army Street". Similarly in Greek, where street names are
> also usually genitive. Similar considerations may also apply to other parts
> of addresses in other languages (e.g. is it "Foo[nom.]
> Province" or
> "Foo[gen.] Province / Province of Foo"?).

Longrim streets would definitely be have-genitive. For example, "Street of the Tenth 
Month (of the year, more or less, October)" is "Hîth i Verráth", where "i" is a definite 
genitive article (or, definite article inflected for the genitive case).
 
> Oh, and: I was told that traditionally, English addresses had a comma
> at the end of each line, and lines were indented successively, like
> so:
> 
>     John Smith,
>       Mon Repos,
>         High Street,
>           Colton-le-Naze,
>             Foos. AB12 3EF,
>               ENGLAND
> 
> What formatting do you use? (And do you put the address on the top
> left, bottom left, top right, bottom right, of an envelope or
> postcard? Where does the return address go? [Would that have the
> sender's name in the ablative or something?])

Since Longrim, for example, would write letters on papyrus or parchment scrolls rather 
then on paper sheets, they probably wouldn't have any envelopes. The address could 
be written upon a small paper note attached to the scroll. 

It would like like this (probably):

Dôr Dulrent (the Guarded Kingdom)
I Tadhúnar (The Highlands/a Northern district)
Avóren (a city in Door Dulrent)
Hîth i Verráth (Street of the Tenth Month)
i Vairae (a possable name of a house)

Tom DB

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