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TEI-L  September 2010

TEI-L September 2010

Subject:

Re: signed vs. salute

From:

"Paul F. Schaffner" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Wed, 8 Sep 2010 09:56:27 -0400

Content-Type:

TEXT/PLAIN

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

TEXT/PLAIN (110 lines)

On Wed, 8 Sep 2010, Torsten Schassan wrote:

> another detail: How differs <signed> from <salute>?
>
> In the examples we have
>
> <closer>
> <salute>Sincerely yours,</salute>
> <signed>Seymour</signed>
> </closer>
>
> and
>
> <signed>Thine to command
> <name>Humph. Moseley</name>
> </signed>

This is a matter of controversy, or at least I have, in the
past, tried to make it one! <signed> and <salute> are two
of the older tags in TEI (which means that very disparate
practices and bodies of legacy data have grown over time);
they are defined in such a way as to make any essential difference
between them far from obvious --


SIGNED: "contains the closing salutation, etc., appended to a foreword,
         dedicatory epistle, or other division of a text"

SALUTE: "contains a salutation or greeting prefixed to a foreword,
         dedicatory epistle, or other division of a text, or the
         salutation in the closing of a letter, preface, etc."


-- and the examples fall into two (I think mutually antagonistic)
groups, leaving it unclear which examples to emulate in
establishing one's own practice, or in attempting to
arrive at a more exact and practical definition:

Group 1 (the 'canonical' example of signed, and your second example
above) treats "yours truly" and such phrases as part of <signed>. Since 
this is the canonical example, one might even suppose that they are
the *quintessential* example of <signed>.

   <signed>Thy repentant husband for his disloyaltie,
   <name>Robert Greene.</name>
   </signed>

   <signed>Thine to command <name>Humph. Moseley</name>
   </signed>


Group 2 (your first example above) treats "yours truly" and similar 
phrases as part of <salute>; since these examples include the
canonical example of <salute>, one might even suppose that
they are the quintessential example of <salute>:

   <closer>
   <salute>Sincerely yours,</salute>
   <signed>Seymour</signed>
   </closer>


   <closer>
   <salute>I am your most humble servant</salute>
   <signed>Joseph Wanton Jr</signed>
   </closer>

One cannot, in my view, have it both ways. I realize that
in the latter group <signed> is wrapped in <closer>,
whereas in the former group it is not, but I do not
see what difference that makes.

In our own practice, we have decided to follow Group 1,
and treat all phrases descriptive of, or in apposition to,
the signatory as part of <signed>, and all phrases attached to
the addressee (and all phrases of greeting (vale, salutem,
etc.) as part of <salute>, and always place both within
either <closer> or <opener>. So we would tag like this

<closer>
<salute>Dear sir,</salute>
<signed>your most obedient servant, J. Smith</signed>
</closer>

or this

<opener>
<signed>Charles, king of England, Ireland, and France,
defender of the faith, &c.</signed>
<salute>to the Sheriff of Nottingham, greetings.<salute>
</opener>

[We also ignore the confusing parts of the definition that
appear to suggest that <signed> belongs only at the close,
and <salute> belongs in either the opener or the closer.
For us, either one or both can appear either at beginning
or at end of a div, indifferently.]

(Others do it differently.)

pfs




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Paul Schaffner | [log in to unmask] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/
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