LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for CONLANG Archives


CONLANG Archives

CONLANG Archives


CONLANG@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CONLANG Home

CONLANG Home

CONLANG  October 2010, Week 4

CONLANG October 2010, Week 4

Subject:

Re: {X} in Your Conscript (was Re: New Zhyler Orthography Page)

From:

Andreas Johansson <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 26 Oct 2010 00:05:25 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (98 lines)

I never got far on the native writing system for Yargish (and not very
much further on the language itself), but one of the things that did
get established was that an X-shaped sign is used as (i) the logogram
for "war, fighting" and (ii) the syllabogram for /jar/. Not
coincidentally, the verbal root for "to fight" is /jar/. And yes, it
occurs in the name of the language, which means approximately "the
language of the warriors" (outsiders being effeminate by definition).

Con-historically, the sign is derived from the image of two crossed
swords (as those of two enemies fencing).

On Mon, Oct 25, 2010 at 10:42 PM, Shair A <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> The "X" shape represents the character for "big" in the script for Bɨɨše.
>
> 2010/10/25 BPJ <[log in to unmask]>
>
>> 2010-10-24 07:13, David Peterson skrev:
>>
>>  The shape "X" seems common enough that it should show up in a
>>> variety of conscripts. I say we start a thread tracking it!
>>>
>>
>> Kijeb syllabary:
>>
>> ŋa /Na/ =   a simple X.
>> ki      =   X with a stroke at the top left arm.
>> tar     =   X with broken top arms.
>> ar      =   ditto with two vertical dots between bottom arms.
>> sat     =   X with stroke thru bottom arms.
>> pa      =   cross with stroke thru lower stem.
>> ka      =   cross potent.
>> ir      =   # with six strokes (y'know what I mean!)
>> mir     =   outlined +.
>> tir     =   swastika [^1].
>> ir      =   fylfot with doubled 'hands'.
>>
>> several other signs (pas, ra, ŋu) are cross/X-like lke but
>> harder to describe in words.  You can see the lot at
>> <http://wiki.frath.net/Kijeb_syllabary_%28Sohlob%29>.
>>
>> Since we're going over uses of the letter _x_ as well:
>>
>> Sohlob latinization:    /x/         (unimaginative!)
>> Old Rhodrese:           /ʃ/, /tʃ/
>>    _tx_                /tʃ/        (also modern Rhodrese)
>> Euia Twas:              /ɕ/
>> Unnamed conlang:        /ɖʐ/
>>    _xh_                /ʐ/
>>
>>    (I wanted to avoid the most run-of-the-mill associations
>>    for the 'superfluous' letters of the Latin alphabet and
>>    yet come up with something consistent that made sense
>>    for me, so this lang got:
>>
>>    _c_ /ʈʂ/ _ch_ /ʂ/ _k_ /tɕ/ _kh_ /ɕ/ _q_ /k/ _qh_ /χ/ _s_
>>    /ts/ _sh_ /s/ _x_ /ɖʐ/ _xh_ /ʐ/ _z_ /dz/ _zh_ /z/.
>>
>>    Alas I couldn't with a good conscience use anything
>>    other than _ph dh th_ for /ɸ ð θ/! There was no /ɣ/ but
>>    there was _ngh_ /ŋ/ against _ng_ /ŋg/! In case you
>>    wonder _j_ was /j/, _v_ was /ʋ/, _w_ was /β/ and
>>    the vowels were
>>
>>    _e_ /ə/ _a_ /ɑ/ _y_ /ɪ/ _i_ /i/ _o_ /ʊ/ _u_
>>    /u/ _ey_ /əɪ/ _ay_ /ɑɪ/ _eo_ /əʊ/ _ao_ /ɑʊ/,
>>
>>    and yes, it was an Indo-Iranian lang, and yes it had a
>>    native script too — based on Kharoṣṭhī, though I hadn't
>>    very good info on how conjuncts and vowel signs worked
>>    in Kharoṣṭhī! :-)
>>
>> [^1]: I based the Kijeb syllabograms on neolithic European
>> signs <http://www.omniglot.com/writing/vinca.htm>, and I
>> simply used such as were there and didn't use such that
>> weren't. Like the Buddhist/Hindu swastika the Kijeb _tir_
>> syllabogram rests on its side.  The Indians' (east and
>> west!) undisfigured and quite benign symbol had a head start
>> by thousands of years on those 20th-century symbol-hijacking
>> scum whose (apparently intentionally) disfigured version
>> stands on its corner. Whatever the meaning the symbol had
>> for the neolithic Europeans it certainly had nothing to do
>> with its 20th-century abuse. My Sohlçan/Kiçan conculture
>> isn't even located in our world, and if the symbol has any
>> meaning for them other than the phome*ic it certainly is
>> akin to the Buddhist one. After all I, their author, have
>> taken the Buddhist refuge. Abusus non tollit usum!
>>
>> /bpj
>>
>



-- 
Andreas Johansson

Why can't you be a non-conformist just like everybody else?

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Error during command authentication.

Error - unable to initiate communication with LISTSERV (errno=111). The server is probably not started.

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager