LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for TEI-L Archives


TEI-L Archives

TEI-L Archives


TEI-L@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

TEI-L Home

TEI-L Home

TEI-L  April 2011

TEI-L April 2011

Subject:

Re: Text Creation Partnership Makes 18th-Century Texts Freely Available to the Public

From:

Rebecca Welzenbach <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Rebecca Welzenbach <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 27 Apr 2011 09:23:30 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (188 lines)

Hi all,

Martin, thanks for your rallying cry! Your longtime support of and
interest in the TCP is (as always) greatly appreciated. However, I
know that our announcement raised many questions and has been
confusing to the non-Martins among us. To that end, we've published a
new blog post explaining the implications of this announcement, and
what people can expect, now and in the near future (the post is
basically a revised version of my long message to the list earlier
this week. It appears on our project home page
http://www.lib.umich.edu/tcp/, and the durable link is
http://textcreate.wordpress.com/2011/04/27/what-the-public-release-of-ecco-tcp-texts-means-for-you-now-and-in-the-future/).

And as always, please feel free to contact [log in to unmask] with
your questions.

Best,
Rebecca Welzebach


2011/4/27 Martin Mueller <[log in to unmask]>:
> To be fair to the University of Michigan Library and all the other folks
> who are involved in and excited about the fact that a subset of TCP texts
> will become publicly before the middle of the decade when all or most of
> them will be: in the management of these texts so far their distribution
> to end users has not been a concern. They have been mediated through
> particular interfaces, such as the Philologic search engine or Michigan's
> OpenText engine. The efforts of the staff have been properly focused on
> quality control of texts as they come in. Resources are tight, people are
> busy, and the schedules of a large digital production centre like
> Michigan's follow rhythms that are measured in months.
>
> Things will take a little while and, as they usually do, take a little
> longer. In the interim, it is worth thinking a little about how users
> could and perhaps should "give back" once the texts circulate freely. Many
> of the TCP texts are in excellent condition. Others less so, reflecting
> the original print quality, the quality of the intermediate microfilm
> image, and the many of a mass-digitizion project in which very
> heterogeneous texts are produced by double keyboarding and reviewed
> through spot-checking rather than the multiple proof-=reading one expects
> in a printed scholarly text.
>
> Many of the errors can be fixed easily once seen. Other errors, involving
> structural encoding, are more problematic. But there are very substantial
> opportunities for users to make these texts much better over time.
> User-driven, incremental, and collaborative data curation will be one of
> the challenges of an environment in which TCP texts become part of the
> public domain. "Many hands make light work" is an old proverb with
> fascinating new applications in a digital world. For 18th century texts
> Laura Mandell and the 18thConnect have taken important steps towards
> collaborative curation or primary scholarly data. But as such texts pass
> into the public domain, their ownership moves from "them" to "us" (or many
> subsets of "us")--a change in pronouns that is worth pondering.
>
>
>
>
> On 4/27/11 2:53 AM, "Jens Østergaard Petersen" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>>On Apr 25, 2011, at 6:54 PM, Lou Burnard wrote:
>>
>>> This does sound very exciting, but when I went to the links you
>>>specified I was a bit disappointed. The Gale site doesn't seem to offer
>>>any way of accessing any texts at all, unless you sign up for a "free
>>>trial", presumably via their search interface.
>>
>>The free trial appears only to be available to persons with addresses in
>>the US and Canada. The omission of the UK here is rather strange. I
>>hesitate to ask, but does this geographical restriction also apply to the
>>part about "we'll send the texts to anyone who asks"?
>>
>>The interface at <http://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebogroup/> requires a
>>umich login, but you can set up a Friend Account for Guest Access.
>>However, logging in to gain "full access" - for me at least - only lets
>>me access the bibliographical description and TOC. And such an account
>>does not appear to give access to <https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/ecco>.
>>The Oxford interface at <http://ecco.odl.ox.ac.uk/e/ecco/> is a little
>>more direct: it simply flashes a "Forbidden" to the curious user.
>>
>>Jens
>>
>>> The TCP site is a lot more informative, but unless I've missed
>>>something doesn't allow me to download the texts in their full TEI Glory
>>>at all.
>>>
>>> What exactly does "freely available to the public" mean, here and now?
>>>On the EEBO forms I read  "TCP does not generally allow individuals
>>>unaffiliated with an institution to download texts for personal use." So
>>>"public" means "affiliated with an institution", and "available" means
>>>"readable but not downloadable"?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On 25/04/11 16:23, Rebecca Welzenbach wrote:
>>>> Greetings, all--
>>>> More news from the TCP‹with apologies for cross posting.
>>>> --
>>>> Rebecca Welzenbach
>>>> MPublishing / Text Creation Partnership
>>>> University of Michigan Library
>>>> [log in to unmask]
>>>> _
>>>> Contact: Ari Friedlander ([log in to unmask])
>>>> Kristina Massari ([log in to unmask])
>>>>
>>>> *Text Creation Partnership makes 18th century texts freely available to
>>>> the public
>>>> *
>>>> (Ann Arbor, MI‹April 25, 2011) ‹ The University of Michigan Library
>>>> announced the opening to the public of 2,231 searchable keyed-text
>>>> editions of books from /Eighteenth Century Collections Online/ (ECCO).
>>>> ECCO is an important research database that includes every significant
>>>> English-language and foreign-language title printed in the United
>>>> Kingdom during the 18th century, along with thousands of important
>>>>works
>>>> from the Americas. ECCO contains more than 32 million pages of text and
>>>> over 205,000 individual volumes, all fully searchable. ECCO is
>>>>published
>>>> by Gale, part of Cengage Learning.
>>>>
>>>> The Text Creation Partnership (TCP) produced the 2,231 keyed texts in
>>>> collaboration with Gale, which provided page images for keying and is
>>>> permitting the release of the keyed texts in support of the Library¹s
>>>> commitment to the creation of open access cultural heritage archives.
>>>>  Gale has been a generous partner, according to Maria Bonn, Associate
>>>> University Librarian for Publishing. ³Gale¹s support for the TCP¹s ECCO
>>>> project will enhance the research experience for 18th century scholars
>>>> and students around the world.²
>>>>
>>>> Laura Mandell, Professor of English and Digital Humanities at Miami
>>>> University of Ohio, says, ³The 2,231 ECCO texts that have been typed by
>>>> the Text Creation Partnership, from Pope's /Essay on Man/ to a
>>>> ŒDiscourse addressed to an Infidel Mathematician,¹ are gems.²  Mandell,
>>>> a key collaborator on 18thConnect, an online resource initiative in
>>>>18th
>>>> century studies, says that the TCP is ³a groundbreaking partnership
>>>>that
>>>> is creating the highest quality 18th century scholarship in digital
>>>>form.²
>>>>
>>>> This announcement marks another milestone in the work of the TCP, a
>>>> partnership between the University of Michigan and Oxford University,
>>>> which since 1999 has collaborated with scholars, commercial publishers,
>>>> and university libraries to produce scholar-ready (that is,
>>>> TEI-compliant, SGML/XML enhanced) text editions of works from digital
>>>> image collections, including ECCO, Early English Books Online (EEBO)
>>>> from ProQuest, and Evans Early American Imprint from Readex.
>>>>
>>>> The TCP has also just published 4,180 texts from the second phase of
>>>>its
>>>> EEBO project, having already converted 25,355 books in its first phase,
>>>> leaving 39,000 yet to be keyed and encoded. According to Ari
>>>> Friedlander, TCP Outreach Coordinator, the EEBO-TCP project is much
>>>> larger than ECCO-TCP because pre-1700 works are more difficult to
>>>> capture with optical character recognition (OCR) than ECCO¹s
>>>> 18th-century texts, and therefore depend entirely on the TCP¹s manual
>>>> conversion for the creation of fully searchable editions.
>>>>
>>>> Friedlander explains that, for a limited period, the EEBO-TCP digital
>>>> editions are available only to subscribers‹ten years from their initial
>>>> release‹as per TCP¹s agreement with the publisher. Eventually all
>>>> TCP-created titles will be freely available to scholars, researchers,
>>>> and readers everywhere under the Creative Commons Public Domain Mark
>>>>(PDM).
>>>>
>>>> Paul Courant, University Librarian and Dean of Libraries, says that
>>>> large projects such as those undertaken by the TCP are only possible
>>>> when the full range of library, scholarly, and publishing resources are
>>>> brought together. ³The TCP illustrates the dynamic role played by
>>>> today¹s academic research library in encouraging library collaboration,
>>>> forging public/private partnerships, and ensuring open access to our
>>>> shared cultural and scholarly record.²
>>>>
>>>> More than 125 libraries participate in the TCP, as does the Joint
>>>> Information Systems (JISC), which represents many British libraries and
>>>> educational institutions.
>>>>
>>>> To learn more about the Text Creation Partnership, visit
>>>> www.lib.umich.edu/tcp <http://www.lib.umich.edu/tcp>
>>>> <_http://www.lib.umich.edu/tcp_> . To learn more about ECCO, visit
>>>> _http://gdc.gale.com/products/eighteenth-century-collections-online/_
>>>>
>>>><_http://gdc.gale.com/products/eighteenth-century-collections-online/_>
>>>>.
>>>>
>

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink