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CONLANG  June 2012, Week 1

CONLANG June 2012, Week 1

Subject:

Re: Book Pahlavi was ridiculous

From:

Padraic Brown <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 2 Jun 2012 04:41:37 -0700

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text/plain

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--- On Sat, 6/2/12, Alex Fink <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Ob-question: anyone have a conscript with similar unfortunatenesses?

Yes -- Talarian writing shares a number of these features. Although it is
now written largely using an alphabet, it has traditionally been written
in a syllabary that doesn't reflect the actual phonology. A number of
words, both content and functional, are written with logographs inherited
from three or four different languages that have influenced the writing
system across its history (Akkadian/Sumerian predominate, but there are
also some Anian and Sian signs in the mix). There are some letters that
look alike, though nowhere near as bad as Pahlavi! Ligatures are common,
especially in the flowing script. Talarian can be written L>R, R>L or 
boustrophedon, at the discretion of the scribe. The conscientious reader
should take a moment to sort out which way the writer is going first.
Sometimes the style changes midtext. Perhaps the worst aspect of writing in
Talarian is that when you quote the words of a saint or guru or god (a
perhaps surprisingly commonplace occurrence), you not only use an entirely
different alphabet, but the quotes are written in Yllurian, an entirely 
different language. The writer has also to be familiar with techniques for
drawing calligraphic forms as well as cuneiform and must also be cognizant 
of color conventions in the writing: names are written in red ink in a red 
cartouche with black dots around; names of gods, saints and gurus are 
written in red ink with a black cartouche with red dots around.

> Alex

Padraic
 

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