LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for CONLANG Archives


CONLANG Archives

CONLANG Archives


CONLANG@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Monospaced Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CONLANG Home

CONLANG Home

CONLANG  December 2012, Week 3

CONLANG December 2012, Week 3

Subject:

Re: USAGE: Generic pronoun for "I, here, this, my"?

From:

Puey McCleary <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 20 Dec 2012 11:05:17 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (61 lines)

I can’t exactly tell you why the Crown Princess chose P- for first person,
T- for second person, and K- for third person. The pattern isn’t
completely perfect. For instance, some of the P- forms alternate with J-
forms. I’d ask her, but right now Princess Éfhelìnye and our exchange
student, Ozma, are studying Rikchik. There are no interwebs in Oz, so Ozma
is trying to learn all that she can.

                I have two guesses, however. Perhaps she associated P-
with first person forms, since “P” is formed near the front of the mouth,
and hence closer to the nose and eyen. “T” would then be in the middle,
and “K” closer to the back and the brains.

                Or perhaps the P- forms remind one of “me” or “mihi” from
Latin, or “mou, moi, me” of Ancient Greek, the T- forms of “Tu” or “thou”
and the K- forms of “qui” in Latin or “kiu” in Esperanto.

                We could look at some examples from other classic languages
and try to find patterns:

                In Láadan we have:

                Le – I

                Ne – Thou

                Be – She

                Hi – That
                Ne reminds me of “Tu.”


                In Klingon we have:

                jIH, maH – I, we

                SoH, tlhIH – Thou, ye

                ghaH, ‘oH, chaH, bIH – He, it, they, they
                jIH and maH sound very first person-y to me. SoH reminds
me of Ancient Greek “su, sou, soi, se.”


                In aUI we have:

                fu – I

                bu – You

                vu – He

                yvu – She

                sE – It

                u – One

                cu – He or she

                To me “u” sounds like “one” or a “person.” It sounds very
pronoun-y to me.

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Error during command authentication.

Error - unable to initiate communication with LISTSERV (errno=111). The server is probably not started.

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager