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AUXLANG  September 2014, Week 4

AUXLANG September 2014, Week 4

Subject:

Max Talmey and Model Language - was RE: Worldlang and other auxlang types

From:

Leo Moser <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

International Auxiliary Languages <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:51:55 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (612 lines)

Leo states: This below is from some of my old files.
I do not have the citation: 
It may be the preface to an Arulo book or an article.

/////// This is by Max Talmey, born 1869 in Tauragė, 
then in Poland, now in Latvia. ///////

MODEL LANGUAGE AND ESSENTIALS OF ARULO

            (Author's summary.—Model language as distinct from
            the international or world language. Arulo as the
            embodiment of the model language idea. Condensed
            account of its structure and a sample of connected
            writing.)

            One of my earliest hobbies was languages. It came
            about through the poverty of words in my mother
            tongue, which was a mere dialect. The first real
            language I learned in school. A new world then
            seemed to open to me. A great many novel concepts
            were encountered that hardly existed in my dialect.
            It had no words to render them, while in the
            language each of them could be expressed by one
            word, in spite of their complexity. In studying a
            second language, the experience obtained with the
            first one and my dialect drew my attention
            particularly to the comparative expressiveness of
            the two languages. They revealed a similar
            phenomenon: many conceptions could be expressed by
            a single word in one language and only by a
            circumlocution in the other. 

	Curiosity was now
            aroused regarding the expressiveness of other
            languages and furnished the incentive to study
            several more of them. By the age of eighteen I had
            acquired a working knowledge of six languages. All
            presented the condition found in the first two: the
            occasional necessity of a circumlocution on one
            language where a single word sufficed in another,
            that is, in every language there was want of
            expressiveness in certain instances.

            My preceding experiences engendered the idea of a
            language never showing lack of expressiveness or
            always possessing one word for every concept
            expressible by a single word in any one of the
            principal languages. This essential feature of the
            imagined language, the ideal, will be better
            understood by the following three sets of examples
            of concepts to be expressed, or definitions, each
            set taken from a different language.

            A. 1. One pretending to a superiority which he does
            not possess; 2. Loath to associate with others; 3.
            State of uncertainty, doubt or temporary inaction.

            B. 1. To suffer an unfortunate accident; 2. To
            cease grieving about a misfortune; 3. Finite
            straight line.

            C. 1. Choicest part of a society, army, etc.; 2.
            Formalities and usages required in polite society;
            3. Intensified imagination and feeling attending
            artistic production.

            The definitions of A can be expressed by one word
            only in English: snob, aloof, abeyance; 
	
	those of B
            only in German: verunglücken, verschmerzen,
            Strecke; 

	those of C only in French: élite, étiquette, verve. 

	An Englishman, a German, and a
            Frenchman are at a loss how to express six of the
            nine concepts without borrowing from two languages
            foreign to them. Something similar holds true in
            other examples that can be added. The ideal
            language would never cause such embarrassment; it
            would possess nine words for the nine concepts cited
            and a word in every other similar instance.

            Besides surpassing the natural languages in
            expressiveness, the imagined language was conceived
            as free from their illogicalities, irregularities,
            ambiguities, and difficulties, in short, as
            rational throughout. This ideal of a language with
            the two features of highest expressiveness and
            strict rationality arose in boyhood and has been
            present in my mind ever since. It caused me to
            acquaint myself in mature life with many more
            languages that I knew in my youth so that I might
            find natural words for concepts such as are given
            in the illustrations above. The ideal, rather vague
            until then, now assumed a more definite shape.

            Recently I designated it by the term Model
            Language, for want of a better expression to
            indicate its two essential features and—its
            purpose.

            From the premise of highest expressiveness it
            follows that the Model Language should be fully
            adequate for communicating all ordinary ideas that
            occur in everyday life. Its true purpose, however,
            is not this but chiefly to serve as a medium of
            expression for the interchange of ideas of moment
            between persons of different mother tongues, as for
            instance when Prof. Einstein lectures on his theory
            before non-German audiences, or when the League of
            Nations holds its conferences, or when a French
            commercial firm deals with a Turkish one.

            None of the natural languages can be the Model
            Language, because its two essential features cannot
            be imparted to any one of them. The Model Language
            can only be a constructed system, though its
            elements must be as natural as possible. With the
            International or World Language it shares this
            feature of being a devised medium, but differs
            radically from the World Language in other
            respects. The International Language in the
            commonly accepted sense is "the second language to
            everybody" and intended to serve mainly for the
            expression of everyday thoughts. On account of this
            it discountenances a high degree of expressiveness,
            restricting its vocabulary to a minimum, and shows
            but little concern for strict rationality. The most
            important difference between the Model Language and
            the International Language is that there is an ever
            growing need for the former, as shown by the
            examples given above—the Einstein lectures,
            etc.,—while the latter, all enthusiasts to the
            contrary notwithstanding, is all but useless. The
            International or World Language is advocated
            principally for the man in the street, and he has
            but very seldom any dealings with his equal of a
            different nation.

            The idea of an International Language is already
            stale. Numerous devices have been proposed for it
            and turned out to be wanting, unfit. Several of
            them once gained a great deal of short-lived
            notoriety, but owing to the lack of any really
            vital need for the International Language, they
            finally failed. This fiasco has completely
            discredited that idea. 

	The Model Language idea,
            however, is novel. No author has ever offered a
            linguistic project intended to be made richer in
            conceptions expressible by one word that any
            natural language and to serve chiefly for the
            communication of valuable thoughts. This idea was
            set forth only recently, in the Scientific Monthly
            of April 1929. It bids fair to be lastingly
            successful because there exists an ever growing
            need for the Model Language.

            Because of the feature which all projects for the
            International Language have in common with the
            Model Language, I devoted a great deal of time and
            effort to some of them. As a boy I learned Volapük.
            It only brought disappointment and was given up
            after half a year. In mature age, I studied
            Esperanto, wrote various articles in and on it, and
            published a complete English text book of the
            project. After two years, however, I abandoned it,
            having convinced myself of its unfitness even for
            the rôle of the International Language. 

	At that
            time there appeared the Language of the Delegation,
            commonly known by the absurd name Ido, which will
            be replaced here by the initials LD. It was framed
            by a body of competent linguists and scientists
            under the leadership of the excellent French
            logician Dr. Louis Couturat. It was far superior to
            any previous project. In contrast to Esperanto, it
            had no religious dogma of inviolability, but was
            made subject to criticism and continued
            improvement. It was free from the visionary
            aspirations of Volapük and Esperanto. For these
            reasons, I devoted myself intensively to the study
            of it for fifteen years. Finally, however, I was
            actuated to withdraw from it because of its
            deterioration, which began at the outbreak of the
            war and then continued unchecked without any
            prospect of regeneration. Several causes
            contributed to this. In the spring of 1914 an
            ill-advised period of stability of ten years was
            decreed, precluding any changes and even criticism
            and thus producing stagnation and retrogression. 
	
	In the fall of that year, the most able leader in the
            LD movement, Dr. Couturat, died, his excellent
            periodical Progreso ceased, and the competent
            Academy for the LD disappeared. New leaders of
            ability did not come upon the scene. In 1921 the
            Academy was reorganized, but it lacked the
            competency of its predecessor and showed itself
            reactionary by prolonging the corrupting period of
            stability to fourteen years and by sanctioning
            officially "firmly rooted" wrong usages of the
            language grown up since 1914.

            I had cooperated in the development of the LD, had
            published an exhaustive English text-book of it and
            various other works in and on it, and had been an
            extensive contributor to Progreso and Mondo, the
            subsequent official organ of the LD. When I had
            convinced myself of the reactionary tendency of the
            new Academy, I decided to undertake all by myself
            the reform of the language. The unstinted approval
            accorded to my criticism and proposals by a handful
            of progressive LD-ists, notably Dr. L.B. Woodcock
            of Scranton, Pa., Mr. Wilhelm Schwarz of Lauenburg,
            Germany, and the most revered member of the old
            Academy and of the new one, Dr. Ignatz Hermann of
            Graz, Austria, encouraged me to go ahead. 

	The grammatical structure was considerably modified,
            definite principles for the selection of the root
            words and for the derivation of others from them
            were set up, and about two thousand new root words
            were introduced. The result of these labors was a
            language that was no longer the LD, though it had
            started from the latter as a basis. The word
            "Arulo," formed from the initial letters of the
            expression "Auxiliary Rational Universal Language"
            was selected as a name for the new language. Its
            complete structure is laid down in several
            publications.* In this brief essay only its
            essentials can be presented.

            Alphabet and Pronunciation. The alphabet is the
            English one. The five vowels a, e, i, o, u have the
            continental pronunciation. The consonant c is
            pronounced like ts even before a, o, u; g as in go;
            j like the French j. S is always sharp or voiceless
            and y is always consonant with the pronunciation of
            the English y in yes or the German j.   Z and the
            digraphs ch and sh are pronounced as in English.

            Grammar. The whole elementary grammar is contained
            in this one rule: the main parts of speech are
            characterized by eighteen desinences called
            grammatical endings. Their forms are as follows:
            The endings 1, -o; 2, -a; 3, -e; 4, -i; 5, -u; 6,
            -n; 7, -f (or -of); 8, -ar; 9, -ir; 10, -or; 11,
            -as; 12, -is (or -id); 13, -os (or -od); 14, -us
            (or -ud); 15, -am; 16, -es; 17, -al; 18, -il denote
            respectively 1, a noun; 2, an adjective; 3, adverb;
            4, a plural; 5, person; 6, the objective case; 7,
            possessive case; 8, the infinitive of the present;
            9, of the past; 10, of the future; 11, the
            indicative of the present; 12, of the past; 13, of
            the future; 14, the conditional; 15, the optative;
            16, the imperative of the second person; 17, the
            suppositional mode (subjunctive) of the present;
            18, of the past.

            There are two articles, a definite one and
            indefinite one: la, the; un, a.

            The comparative and superlative are formed either
            synthetically by the suffixes -iora and -esta or
            analytically by the adverbs plu, more, and maxim,
            most; facila, faciliora (plu facila), facilesta
            (maxim facila), easy, easier, easiest.

            The personal pronouns and possessives are as
            follows: me, I; mea, my, mine; tu, thou, you; tua,
            thy thine, your, yours; vu, you (singular, polite);
            vua, your, yours; il, he; lua, ilua, his; el, she;
            lua, elua, her, hers; ol, it (thing); olua, its;
            lu, he, she (individual or unknown sex); lua, his,
            her, hers; lo, it (fact); it, it (subject of
            impersonal verb); on (or onu), one (indefinite
            person); onua, one's; su, himself, herself, etc.;
            sua, his, her, etc.; ni, we; vi, you (plural); via,
            your, yours; li (or ili, eli, oli), they; lia (or
            ilia, elia, olia), their, theirs.

            The demonstratives and relatives (interrogatives)
            are: questa (-u, -o), this; yena, that; qua, who,
            which.

            The active participles as adjectives have the
            endings -anta, -inta, -onta in the present, past,
            and future respectively. The corresponding passive
            participles end in -ata, -ita, -ota. The passive is
            formed either enalytically with the passive
            participle of the present and the auxiliary
            "verdar" or synthetically with the suffix -verd or
            -erd attached to the root of the verb: il verdis
            blamata (blamverdis), he was blamed. The perfect
            tenses are formed with the suffix -ab; el sendabos,
            she will have sent.

            The numerals are: un, 1; du, 2; tri, 3; quar, 4;
            quink, 5; six, 6; sept, 7; okt, 8; non, 9; dek, 10;
            cent, 100; mil, 1000; milion, million. The
            multiples of ten, hundred, etc., are formed by
            prefixing the multiplicator in adjectival form:
            oktacent, 800. The numbers between the preceding
            ones are constructed by addition: triacent e
            sixadek e quink, 365.

            Sources of the vocabulary. The roots of complete
            words must be a posteriori, i.e. taken from the
            natural languages. Proper phoneticism sometimes
            requires slight changes of form. Thus c must be
            replaced by k before consonants and a, o, u; ph by
            f; voiced s by z; y as vowel by i; and double
            letters must be excluded; konstruktar, fazo,
            simfonio, mola (Lat. mollis). The number of
            international words being far too insufficient,
            extensive use is made of national words, English
            being the foremost source of the latter. Latin and
            Greek are extensively resorted to. Latin and Greek
            words and phrases in original spelling and
            inflection may be used unrestrictedly; and
            scientific terms, too, need not undergo any change
            of form: exempli causa, id est, phyllopoda, sit
            venia verbo, appendicitis, atropa belladonna,
            etc. **

            Derivation. The formation of new words from given
            ones is regulated completely by the "principle of
            the additional idea": Every additional idea (idea
            not contained in the original) in the meaning of a
            derivative requires an additional formal element in
            the latter. Accordingly, derivation without adding
            a new idea is to be accomplished immediately, i.e.
            merely by the grammatical endings, which have no
            meanings by themselves: stono, stone; stona, stony
            (which is stone). This derived adjective contains
            no additional idea. Derivation with the addition of
            a new idea, however, must be mediate, i.e.
            performed by affixes which have meanings by
            themselves: ston-ala, -atra, -oza, relating to, of
            the nature of, containing stone.

            The noun obtained immediately from an adjective has
            been designated as the Aristotelian substantive. It
            contains no additional idea; utila, useful; la
            utilo, the useful (anything). Arist. substs. are
            obtainable from all kinds of adjectives, as has
            been shown in an extensive special essay on it
            (Filologiala Temi, No. II); natanto, anything
            swimming. The Arist. subst. of adjectives referring
            to a nation denotes its language: Anglo, English;
            Alemando, Geman; Italo, Italian.

            The noun formed immediately from a verb signifies
            "act expressed by the verb," a meaning that
            contains no additional idea: solvar, to solve;
            solvo, solution (act of solving). Other derived
            verbal nouns require affixes: solv-uro, solution
            (result of solving); solv-ateso, solution (state of
            being solved). The three verbal nouns just treated
            may be replaced by the Latin verbal
            substantive—usually in its Spanish form—:
            soluciono, solution (all senses); direkciono,
            eliziono, etc.

            Primary verbs of Latin origin are formed mostly
            from the supine, sometimes from the infinitive, and
            rarely from the Latin verbal substantive:
            konceptar, to conceive (form an idea); koncipar, to
            conceive (begin to develop an embryo); mocionar, to
            make a motion.

            Verbs can be derived from non-verbal roots only
            mediately, because the derivative invariably
            contains an additional idea; armo, arm-izar, to arm
            (provide with arms); frukto, frukt-ifar, to produce
            fruit; pura, pur-igar, to render pure.

            Precisely defined formatives are needed for mediate
            derivation. They may be a priori. About sixty such
            affixes are employed in Arulo. A few of those
            peculiar to it are cited here. Ent- = to deprive
            of; entfoliar, to defoliate; er- = to obtain
            through; erflatar, to wheedle out; -azar = to
            practice the art, profession of, behave like;
            puerazar, to act like a boy; -ear = to commit,
            occupy oneself with; pekear, to sin: muzikear, to
            practice music; -ezo = abstract quality; belezo,
            beauty; parentezo, parenthood; etc.

            Composition. The form and meaning of words built by
            combining two or more words into one constitute a
            subject too complicated to be treated in a short
            article. This subject has been fully discussed in
            an extensive essay (Filol. Temi) presenting points
            of great importance for a logical language. Only
            one of them can be touched upon here. The form and
            meaning of all kinds of composites are determined
            by several principles, the paramount one being the
            principle of the additional idea. Accordingly, the
            meaning of a compound cannot contain an idea not
            contained in its components. For instance,
            "interakto" can only signify "act between" (between
            any two events determined by the context), but
            cannot mean "pause," because the idea "pause" is
            not contained in the components "inter" and "akto."

            The further development of Arulo should go on
            uninterruptedly without dogmas of inviolability,
            without periods of stability. Until now the
            language has advanced so far that it is more
            efficient than any linguistic system ever devised
            and is even more expressive in a good many
            instances that the natural languages. The main task
            still to be performed is to further purge Arulo of
            the arbitrary forms abounding in its basis, the LD,
            and to bring it nearer the aim of the Model
            Language outlined above, that is to say, a
            vocabulary so rich as to afford one word for every
            concept expressible by a single word in the natural
            languages. Suggestions for approaching that aim are
            given in a large work, not yet published, that
            treats all aspects of the Model Language into which
            it is proposed that Arulo should be developed.

            In conclusion, the translation into Arulo of
            Goethe's "Die Ceder" together with the original,
            and also an original Arulo poem by Dr. Hermann are
            given to show what Arulo looks like, and to prove
            that it can be made fit even for fine literature.

               NASKO DI LA LAKRIMO        BIRTH OF THE TEAR
            La okulo di la homo       The eye of man
            Olim venis al cielo.      Once came to heaven.
            Prosternante devan Deo    Prostrating itself before
                                      God
            Olu pregis la Sinioro:    It prayed the Lord:
            "Donez a me adornivo,     "Give me an adornment
            Por ke olu me distangam   That may distinguish me
            In la facio di la homo."  In the face of man."
            La Kreintu astonerdis     The Creator was
                                      astonished
            Pri la prego dil okulo    At the prayer of the eye
            Suficante distingata      Sufficiently
                                      distinguished
            Mem sem adorniv aparta    Even without a separate
                                      adornment,
            Kom katoptro di la almo.  As the mirror of the
                                      soul.
            Lu gracoze interogas:     He graciously asks:
            "Num deziras tu juveli?   "Do you wish jewels?
            Forsan perli, diamanti?"  Perhaps pearls,
                                      diamonds?"
            La okulo dicis lore:      The eye said then:
            "Nule me deziras perli,   "Nowise do I wish pearls,
            Nule anke diamanti,       Nowise also diamonds,
            Quin ya furtus mala homi. Which bad men would
                                      certainly steal.
            Donez a me adornivo       Give me an adornment
            Nefurtebla, neperdebla."  That cannot be stolen,
                                      cannot be lost."
            Ridetante dicis Deo:      Smiling said God:
            "Retreandez tu al tero,   "Go back to the earth,
            Sur la voyo tu recevos    On the way you will
                                      receive
            L'adornivo dezirata."     The desired adornment."
            Descendante frol cielo    Descending from heaven
            La okulo vidis nubo        The eye saw a cloud
            Formacita dal fumuro      Formed by the smoke
            Di brulanta granda urbi   Of burning great cities
            E vilaji e foresti.             And villages and forests.
            Tra lakuni di la nubo     Through gaps in the cloud
            La okulo vidis agri         The eye saw fields
            Devastita e sur oli         Devastated and on them
            Dil milito la viktimi       The war's victims
            Mutilita, okcidita.         Mutilated, slaughtered.
            Lore sentis la okulo      Then the eye felt
            In su ulo opresanta       In itself something
                                                  oppressing
            E salianta ad extere.     And springing outward.
            En! Aparis in l'angulo    Lo! There appeared in the
                                      corner
            Di ol ronda granda guto   Of it a round big drop
            Velut perlo klara, velut    Like a pearl clear, like
            Diamanto reyonanta—       A diamond radiant—
            Lore naskis la lakrimo.     Then was born the tear.



                    LA CEDRO                   DIE ZEDER
                    DA GOETHE                  VON GOETHE

            Un cedro kreskis inter    Eine Zeder wuchs auf
            abieti; li partajis kun      zwischen Tannen; sie
            lu pluvo e sunlumo. E lu    teilten mit ihr Regen und
            kreskid e kreskid super    Sonnenschein. Und sie
            lai kapi e spektis              wuchs und wuch über ihre
            lontane la valo cirkume.  Häupter und schaute weit
            Tum klamis la abieti: "Es ins Tal umher. Da riefen
            questo la danko, ke tu    die Tannen: "Ist das der
            prezumptas, tu, qua so    Dank, dass du dich
            mikra esid, tu, quan ni     überhebst, dich, die du
            nutris?" E la cedro           so klein warst, dich, die
            parlis: "Disputez kun       wir genährt haben?" Und
            yenu, qua a me kreskar    die Zeder sprach:
            imperis!"                         "Rechtet mit dem, der
                                                     mich wachsen hiess!"

            E cirkum la cedro stacid  Und um die Zeder standen
            dornarbusti: Questi        Dornsträucher. Die
            iraskeskid, ke lu so         ergrimmten, dass sie so
            splendida stacid in sua   herrlich dastand in ihrer
            krafto devan la facio dil Kraft vor dem Antlitz des
            cielo, e klamis: "Ve por  Himmels, und riefen:
            la fieru, lu prezumptas   "Wehe dem Stolzen, er
            pro sua kreskuro!" E       überhebt sich seines
            quande la venti la krafto Wuchses!" Und wie die
            di lua branchi agitis, e    Winde die Macht ihrer
            balzamfragranco la lando  Aeste bewegten, und
            penetris, turnid su la      Balsamgeruch das Land
            dorni e kriis: "Ve por la  erfüllte, wandten sich
            superbu! Lua fierezo      die Dörner und schrieen:
            eferveskas velut ondi dil "Wehe dem Uebermütigen!
            maro! Destruktez lu,      Sein Stolz braust auf wie
            Santu dil cielo!"             Wellen des Meeres!
                                                    Verdirb ihn, Heiliger vom
                                                    Himmel!"

            Quande tum la viri venis  Da nun die Männer kamen
            frol maro e la axinon an  vom Meere und die Axt ihr
            lua radiko pozid, lore      an die Wurzel legten, da
            levid su un exulto: "Ite   erhob sich ein
            punisas la Sinioro la       Frohlocken: "Also strafet
            fieri, ite humilias lu la    der Herr die Stolzen,
            potenti!"                          also demütigt er die
                                                     Gewaltigen!"

            E lu tumblis e frakasid   Und sie stürzte und
            l'exultanti, qui verdis     zerschmetterte die
            dispersata sub la           Frohlocker, die
            branchetajo.                  verzettelt wurden unter
                                                   dem Reisig.

            E lu tumblis e klamis:    Und sie stürzte und rief:
            "Me stacadis, e me        "Ich habe gestanden, und
            stacados!" E la viri          ich werde stehen!" Und
            erektis lu kom masto in   die Männer richteten sie
            la navo dil rego, e la      auf zum Maste im Schiffe
            segeli fluktuadis fro ol  des Königs, und die Segel
            e bringadis la trezori     wehten von ihm her und
            fro Ophir in la regof      brachten die Schätze aus
            gazo.                              Ophir in des Königs
                                                   Kammer.
   
 ...............
            266 West 113th St.
            New York City                            MAX TALMEY
            ----------------------------------------------------
            * Supplemento al Raporto 28: Arulo Text Book of the
            Universal Language: Lexikologio di Arulo.

            ** Fault has been found with Arulo for being
            "specifically a technico-scientific language." This
            is unjustified. Arulo does not even favor the
            creation of forms of its own for
            technico-scientific terms, but advocates using
            these in their original form without any
            alteration, for instance, 'pharyngitis,
            chlorophyllon, chrysanthemon, etc.' instead of
            'faringito, klorofilo, krizantemo, etc.' (See
            Lexikologio, p. 52.)

            Neither is Arulo exclusively a "Gebildetensprache"
            (a language for the educated only), as it has been
            called by a German scholar. For it strives to
            attain the greatest possible expressiveness. Hence
            it must be fully adequate for expressing also all
            ideas of the uneducated.
///////////////////

Regards,   LEO


-----Original Message-----
From: International Auxiliary Languages [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Paul Bartlett
Sent: Friday, September 26, 2014 10:14 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Worldlang and other auxlang types

On 2014-09-25 10:06 PM, Leo Moser wrote:

> Dr. Max Talmey was a very interesting man. He followed Esperanto, 
> (later reported on its defects), then Ido -- which he tended to call 
> 'the International Language' or "the IL," or ILO.
>
>   But Talmey felt that 'the IL' could be reformed, made a more 
> significant intellectual instrument.  I have seen some of his Arulo 
> work, etc., and glowing stories about it, but I see little to warrant any great enthusiasm.
>
> I'd welcome any impression you may have of his projects, since I have 
> not seen his work in any full format.
> [trim]

As I mentioned, the Library of Congress catalog lists four works by him apparently bearing directly on IALs (two on Arulo). The dates are not unequivocally such to put them in the public domain, but perhaps something could be done under the Doctrine of Fair Use (in the US copyright law). Maybe I can get down there one day next week and take a look. :) (Depending on size I might be able to make photocopies or "rough" (but usable) PDF color scans (if the free scanners are working correctly).

--
Paul Bartlett

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