LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for TEI-L Archives


TEI-L Archives

TEI-L Archives


TEI-L@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

TEI-L Home

TEI-L Home

TEI-L  March 1996

TEI-L March 1996

Subject:

Re: SGML Software for Windows and MAC

From:

Wendell Piez <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Wendell Piez <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 4 Mar 1996 10:46:59 CST

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (75 lines)

On Feb 29, 10:40am, Bruce Graver wrote:
> Subject: Re: SGML Software for Windows and MAC
> I have been using the pre-release of the WordPerfect SGML edition since
> last November, and although I've found a few minor glitches, on the
> whole it works very well.  You would need to get the special versions of
> the TEI dtds, which are available from CETH.
>
> Actually, the CETH folks ought to answer this question; they just put
> out a highly favorable review of the product.
>-- End of excerpt from Bruce Graver
 
Yes, we did review the WordPerfect SGML Edition quite favorably in our
last newsletter (and apologies for not jumping on this sooner; in recent
days we have been very stretched at CETH).
 
These days we are basically using two packages for creating TEI
documents on a personal computer: SoftQuad's Author/Editor and the new
WordPerfect 6.1, SGML Edition (pre-release version).
 
In general, we are still finding Author/Editor to be the best
entry-level pc tool for SGML text creation. While it doesn't have the
kinds of formatting capabilities of a WYSIWYG word processor, and its
interface is a bit unwieldy in places, it has two major advantages. It
is quite legible; and since it doesn't have lots of formatting bells and
whistles it works well to help keep the focus of concentration on the
encoding, which is where it should be.  Author/Editor is a product of
SoftQuad Inc. of Toronto (at http://sq.com/), and is available for both
Windows and Mac.
 
WordPerfect is certainly a competitive option, however; in particular
its support of printing, as you might expect, is fairly powerful and
versatile even in the pre-release version of the program (although
there's still work to be done improving its layout design utility). It
also promises very nice macro features (we haven't had much time to work
with these yet).
 
An announcement of the pre-release version's availability was posted on
Novell's web server last September (on a web page no longer accessible
to my browser); since then we don't know of any new developments other
than the recent acquisition of WordPerfect by Corel--which is promising,
inasmuch as Corel has also been working on SGML support from Ventura,
its desktop publishing package. WordPerfect/SGML is only available for
Windows.
 
Whether you should favor A/E or WordPerfect depends on a number of
factors. If you are only beginning with SGML, don't already have
expertise in WordPerfect, and are producing files to be used in other
SGML applications, Author/Editor might be the better choice. WordPerfect
might be better if you know and like the word processor, if you want to
use the same program for markup and printing, or if you want powerful
macros.
 
Both these packages handle the TEI Lite quite nicely once you have
mastered a few technical tricks in compiling the necessary binary
versions of the DTD.  When working with richer flavors of the TEI, we've
been 'pre-parsing' the DTD (using a PERL routine written by Greg Murphy
and available for ftp at ceth.princeton.edu) into a single file (i.e. a
long, flat DTD with no parameter entities); otherwise SoftQuad's
RulesBuilder and WordPerfect's 'DTD to LGC' programs can have trouble
compiling them.
 
We are working on documentation of all this, and have something of a
scattered library of DTD's both preparsed and in compiled .rls and .lgc
formats (SoftQuad's and WordPerfect's binary formats respectively). In
due course, much of this stuff will be made available on the web; in the
meantime interested developers can contact us.
 
As for other pc-based tools, I don't have broad experience but haven't
come across anything to recommend. I do hope other readers of the list
post their observations to this thread.
 
Wendell Piez
Center for Electronic Texts in the Humanities
[log in to unmask]

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options