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AUXLANG  December 1997, Week 5

AUXLANG December 1997, Week 5

Subject:

English world language

From:

Kjell Rehnström <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

International Auxiliary Languages <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 31 Dec 1997 10:27:12 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (69 lines)

Mark Line wrote:
>Kjell Rehnstr=F6m wrote:
>>
>> Mark Line wrote:
>> >
>> >It does, but not exclusively. The list is about international auxiliary
>> >languages, which need not be artifically constructed. There are several
>> >of us heretics who believe that the most viable IAL might be a natlang.
>>
>> On the face of it there is nothing heretic in believing this. The real
>> herecy is believing that you could use a man-made or man-organized
>> language and use it.
>
>I guess I need to state explicitly that I was being facetious when I
>called myself a heretic. The fact is that every successful IAL known to
>history (successful in terms of regionally or globally widespread use as
>an L2) has been a natlang, not a conlang.

It is braking through open doors to state that. Everybody knows it.

Those of us who are vocal
>about the possibilities of natlang IAL's have occasionally been made to
>feel as though our stance were heretical. At least one subscriber here
>uses the term "IAL" to mean "conlang IAL", and has stated as much
>categorically (i.e. it's up to the rest of us to remember who's using
>the term to mean what).
>
There are a lot of newsgroups about English as Second Language and all
that, and as second language. As a matter of fact I am just in this very
moment using English as an auxiliary language. As this statement is read by
people who have other mother tongues.

The fascinating thing is that Homo Sapiens Sapiens can devise languages and
use them. And one inventor of a communication system may well be surprized
to see his invention used for quite another purpose.

The French  army captain Charles Barbier invented an =E9criture nocturne
(night writing) for use by the military. Luis Braille came accross the
system, simplified it and voil=E0 there was the Braille for the Non-sighted.

Or take Bliss with the pictogrammatic international language which nowadays
is used at hospitals in many countries in communication with children who
cannot read and grown-ups who have speech handicaps

Braille is fantastic in the sence that if you can read Swedish Braille it
is not at all difficult to read Russian Braille as well.

>[NB: Future facetiousnesses will still not be marked as such...]

Good, it is always interesting to determine what is a joke and what isn't.

>> If most
>> people get good education this can well lead to the result that kids in
>> Scandinavian schools will in some way or another speak "better" English
>> than kids in run down and neglected schools in a country where English is
>> the national language.
>
>"Better" in terms of mastery of a standardized form of the language,
>yes.
>
True.


Kjell [log in to unmask]
Kjell Rehnstroem
Vaenortsgatan 87
S-752 64  UPPSALA
Suedia - Sweden

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