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AUXLANG  January 1998, Week 3

AUXLANG January 1998, Week 3

Subject:

Re: Change in the translation of Psalm 23

From:

STAN MULAIK <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

International Auxiliary Languages <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 18 Jan 1998 12:46:19 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

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text/plain (39 lines)

>"Pastore" simply does not mean "shepherd" in Novial, any more than
>"dilapidated" means "missing stones" in English or "adios" means "to God" in
>Spanish, though the latter is obviously what it would mean if a space were
>put into the word after the "a." To put "pastore" in the translation makes it
>"The Lord is my pastor." IN THE ENGLISH SENSE OF "PASTOR" and the French sense
>of "pasteur." This is NOT what the verse says.
>
>The Hebrew word "ro-i" comes from a root that means "to take care." It is, in
>Biblical Hebrew, always used, to be sure, in the sense of "shepherd."
>(Strictly
>speaking, "ro-eh" is the word for "shepherd"; "ro-i" means "my shepherd.")
>When in doubt, go to the Hebrew; occasionally it is found with the additional
>word "tzon" (sheep) after it. So the word "sheep" is not contained in it, but
>only implied.
 
Well, at least you see the literary point of using a word for "shepherd" in
there, and that was my main point.
 
Novial is sort of hamstrung by its requirement to have monosemic words, when
the international vocabulary often lists several meanings for a given word.
 
"pastor" is listed as the international substantive for "shepherd" and "pastor" =
priest, minister in the religious sense.  But while only Spanish and Italian
(and southwest U.S. English from the Spanish) use "pastor" for herdsman, all
of the Romance languages use "pastoral" to refer to the life and countryside
involved in herding and shepherds as well as for that pertaining to spiritual
care and guidance, especially of a congregation. That (by back formation)
from "pastoral" justifies "pastor" for the shepherd term, supported by two of
the languages.
 
In Interlingua, "dilapidated" has lost the meaning of having lost stones,
and is listed in its own right under the common, international meaning of
dilapidar = to squander, to waste from dis- + lapidare, to pelt with stones,
destroy.  (That's Webster's account of the origin. However, I wonder if
something went to decay or partial ruin because everyone was stealing stones
to build new things).
 
Stan Mulaik

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