LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for AUXLANG Archives


AUXLANG Archives

AUXLANG Archives


AUXLANG@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

AUXLANG Home

AUXLANG Home

AUXLANG  March 1998, Week 5

AUXLANG March 1998, Week 5

Subject:

Re: Name that Language (fwd)

From:

"Donald J. HARLOW" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

International Auxiliary Languages <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 30 Mar 1998 15:43:47 -0800

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (48 lines)

Je 04:47 ptm 3/30/98 -0500, emerson alcott skribis:
 
>James Chandler wrote:
>
> Esp-ists have taken up (officially or not) a number of words and
>>suffixes from Ido.
>
>        what words and suffixes have been taken from ido?  (also, about how
>many people speak Ido?)
>
A good working hypothesis is that the suffix -END was borrowed by Esperanto
from Ido.
 
I have the impression that at least some of the MAL-synonyms used by some
authors (particularly Fernando de Diego) came originally from Ido. They are
not, however, officially part of Esperanto, and (unlike some other types of
unofficial words) are never used in ordinary parlance. I cannot, in fact,
think of an official Esperanto root that came from Ido, though there may
well be a few. Ebbe VILBORG's (so-far) four-volume _Etimologia Vortaro_
will show you where any official Esperanto word has an Ido cognate, but it
would require additional research to determine which came first (usually,
it would be the Esperanto variant, for obvious reasons).
 
James can perhaps answer the question about the number of speakers better
than I can. I have heard figures ranging as high as 500.
 
>>Or you could always take a look at Ido or Novial ...
>
>        I've wanted to study Novial but it appears to be in 'revision'
>currently.  Do you know who's makeing this Novial98 and what he/she is=
 doing
>to it?  (also, how many people speak Novial?)
>
Just follow this list. Currently there are three semi-competing variants of
Novial in the works. As to the number of speakers ... it is not clear how
many of the 10-20 individuals involved in these operations can actually
speak Novial. So far, we've turned up one individual (Valter AHLSTEDT) who
still speaks the original Novial. Evidently there are several others who
can read and write in the language.
 
>Ne estu sola en la mondo, Lernu Esperanton!
>=20
Dankon, mi jam faris anta=FD jaroj -- kaj ne restas sola.
 
-- Don HARLOW
http://www.webcom.com/~donh/
(English version: http://www.webcom.com/~donh/dona.html)

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Error during command authentication.

Error - unable to initiate communication with LISTSERV (errno=111). The server is probably not started.

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager