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I wouldn't abandon all hope.  I just checked her website, and she's
talking about the attitude circa 1992.  Since then, Paramount has
published 3 books on klingon (including the recent Klingon Hamlet),
2 audio titles and one software product.  Given the way personnel
changes in these big media corporations, the person(s?) who passed
on Romulan is probably not even there any longer.  True, the Klingon
Hamlet came to them ready-made (being just a revision of the Klingon
Language Institute's Hamlet published a few years ago), but there
are any number of ready-made Star Trek languages put together by
enthusiasts, if they wanted to go that route.

-- Terry

http://www.geocities.com/teresh_2000
http://www.geocities.com/weseb_2000

At 01:20 PM 02/17/2000 -0500, you wrote:
>Apropos of Klingon, I saw that Diane Duane had wanted to do a Romulan
>(Rhihansu? sp?) language book but Paramount made it clear that Klingon
>wasn't that much of a money maker and they weren't interested in any other
>language works (I read this on Duane's personal web site).  A few weeks ago
>I happened across writers' guidelines for Pocket Books' Star Trek novels,
>and they said categorically that they would not accept any new language
>proposals, glossaries, dictionaries, etc.
>
>Too bad!
>
>I half hoped somebody would convince them to do a Vulcan loglang that was
>"logical" and easy to learn.  Klingon is so hard to learn (and rightfully
>so, given the dramatic function it was meant to fulfill) that I'd love to
>see the deep pockets of Paramount promoting an easy-to-use loglang.
>Anything to get Americans learning some other language.
>
>Ah, well, maybe in the Mirror Universe...
>
>Best regards,
>
>Jeffrey Henning
>http://www.LangMaker.com/ - Invent Your Own Language
>http://www.Jeffrey.Henning.com/
>"If Bill Gates had a nickel for every time Windows crashed....  Oh, wait, he
>does!"