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From: "And Rosta"

> BTW, my primary muse for conlanging is and has always been English. I seem
to
> be the only conlanger over the age of 12 for whom this is the case. So
where
> you identify mobile stress as a nifty feature of Tagalog, I would identify
it
> as a nifty feature of English. I am in the process of doing an overhaul
> of Livagian phonology & was utterly delighted to find that the consonantal
> phoneme inventory looks basically like English's with a few gaps filled in
> the velar series and with a few clicks flung in. I've always felt that
> English gets unjustly slighted by (anglophone) conlangers.

Perhaps the lack of exoticism and the risk of relexing?(note, however, the
high frequency of the sounds represented by eth and thorn in conlangs, which
I understand are relatively rare in natlangs) I myself have been unable to
adequately analyze how stress in Géarthnuns works (other than it's kind of
loose iambic), working merely on intuition (there was a discussion here a
long time ago and a pointer to a website that went well over my head), and
as there are no regular rules like the final syllable stress of French or
the initial syllable stress of Hungarian or penultimates in other Romance
langs, I suspect that those with the tools to analyze would probably find a
stress pattern at least akin to English, my native tongue. A muse though?
Nah, SOV rules in my book.

Kou