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At 22:59 03/03/00 -0500, Feesh wrote:

>At 09:52 AM 3/3/00 -0600, Jan wrote:
>>You guys keep talking about these great walls,
>>I have never dove a wall in fact I have never hardly dove :-)
>>I wonder if I could have a definition of  "best wall".
>>Then if you are up for
>>it describe this wall for me and why it is best.

>For readers who are interested in "wall diving" and what makes
>divers call some walls "great" (not "best"), here are three
>posts you can find in Deja.com.

O.K., I'll try to share a few notes about wall diving, with those who are
too lazy to do a net search :-)

In many places (I haven't really been to a lot of places so I won't say
"most") the ocean floor, or the lake floor, is sloping gently into the
abyss.  That means that as divers, we usually swim along reefs or on wrecks
that sit on horizontal (or a very gently sloped) bottom.  Nevertheless, in
a few (relatively) dive sites there is a drop off that create something
that looks like a rocky wall, in the water.  The closer to vertical
position, the better.

I found this kind of formation to be typical to islands in the middle of
deep sea and to places where the mountains are dropping straight into the
ocean (or the lake).  I have seen great walls in the Red Sea, in the north
Mediterranean Sea (both where mountains are steeply sloping straight into
the sea) and in the Caribbeans and in the Indian Ocean near East Africa
(which are deep sea islands).  I am sure that divers on this list can
provide a lot more examples of wall diving sites.

This kind of bottom formation (actiually you can call it "no bottom"
formation :-)   ) makes diving a lot more interesting (IMO) especially if
the visibility is good.  Imagine diving along a rocky wall, covered with
beautiful coral heads and anemones, and thousands of colorful fish around
them.  Imagine looking down and seeing the rocky wall disappearing in the
deep blue abyss.  Imagine looking up and seeing the wall going up as far as
you can see.  Imagine looking straight into the blue (opposite to the wall)
and seeing the big animals (sharks, mantas, dolphins) swimming in the open
blue water, getting close to the wall to get food (especially in strong
currents).

As a diver I haven't seen anything more beautiful than what I tried to
describe here and obviously failed due to language deficiencies :-)

Any poets on the list to give a better description?


Regards

                      Kuty