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>>> Kenji Schwarz <[log in to unmask]> 04/12 9:17  >>>
How can I resist?  My top fives:
> NATLANGS:  well, work and play are hard to separate here, but just to make
> it sporting I'll leave out the ones I'm obliged to know for "professional
> purposes".
>
> 1) Nahuatl (classical and/or modern).  I laboriously worked my way thorugh
> Anderson's "Introduction to Classical Nahuatl" a good ten years ago, and
> I'm not sure how much I really learned at the time -- and whatever I did
> is pretty well forgotten by now.  It's an aesthetically pleasing language,
> aurally and grammatically; there's also quite a lot of interesting texts
> from the colonial period to read.

Aha! Someone who shares my interest!
I'm re-reading some Nahuatl these days.

Well, here is my CONLANG wish list:
1) My still unnamed language (that will probably never be finished)
that is based on Aztec sounds and Salish grammar: because is mine
and it has to become my "Masterpiece".
2) Hatasoe: because it sounds so good.
3) Gbwi`a`: because I like the tones and the clicks
4) Shdeete: because I like the morphology so much
5) Leropho (the language that Ed and I made together): because of the
pleasing sounds, the neat grammar and the teamwork

The ones that didn't make the top 5:
Tepa and Sawila

NATLANG:
1) Aztec
2) Mohawk
3) Lakhota
4) Yucatec Maya (very rusty nowadays)
5) Quichua (it is nice to converse in Quichua with the Otavaleņos that
make music in the streets; and it's an easy grammar!)

Didn't make the top 5:
Greek (Dimotiki), Zulu and Maltese