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Don Harlow replied to me (and Chris in a similar vein):
> >I suspect that what was meant by "resources" is the 100+ years of
> >literature that Esperantists have written.  Given that Esperantists seem to
> >like to write and translate literature a lot, the Esperanto literature
> >seems to be very large relative to its speaker base (however many that is);
> >many languages with 10 times the number of speakers have less written and
> >translated literature.
>
>I'm not sure what Chris had in mind when he used the word "resources", but
>I would argue that far more important than Esperanto's literature are
>Esperanto's human resources. These are the sources of the organizations,
>the institutions, the activities, the courses, etc. -- and, of course, the
>literature -- that make up the infrastructure of the Esperanto movement.
>
>Having a large literary corpus _does_ have its advantages, as we saw today
>when Charles George Haberl posted Dr. Wolkowski's request and all I had to
>do was point to a web page (however, if Dr. Wolkowski already has these 20
>lines in 89 languages, I'm willing to bet that one of those is the same
>Esperanto translation I suggested).

I think the reason why I consider the literary corpus more significant is
because it more than the human resources argues for leaving Esperanto
unchanged by possible reforms.  Human beings can be retaught, especially if
the reforms were minor, but updating the enormous Esperanto literary corpus
is probably impossible.

The same is a significant argument against, say, English spelling
reform.  Even if people COULD learn it and wanted to, all libraries would
become obsolete.

lojbab
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lojbab                                             [log in to unmask]
Bob LeChevalier, President, The Logical Language Group, Inc.
2904 Beau Lane, Fairfax VA 22031-1303 USA                    703-385-0273
Artificial language Loglan/Lojban:  http://www.lojban.org (newly updated!)