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On First Fire of Tenderness of first Red Cat, DOUGLAS KOLLER wrote:

> I was watching part of the Gay Rights Rally in Washington yesterday on
> CSpan, and at some point, the term "unamerican" (by a gay speaker) popped
> up. "Unamerican" is, obviously, an extremely loaded political term which
> means "going against the American ethos", which might mean "being against
> life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" plus a surfeit of connotative
> layers (and -- I don't wish to open a can of politcal worms -- can be
> co-opted by *any*one trying to diss opposing political views).
>
> My question to non-English speakers -- Irina, Christophe, Carlos, BP,
> Lars... (and perhaps to non-American, English speakers, though "unenglish,
> unBritish" doesn't sound like a big reach to me [unAustralian?]):
>
> Does political rhetoric in your country play this card?  Is there
> "un-Dutch", un-French", "un-Argentinian", "un-Swedish", "un-Danish"....
> behavior?  How is it codified (by which I mean, what prized views of your
> country is it supposed to be antithetical to?), and what is the
> push-button
> term in your various languages? "osvensk"?
>
Uncolombian... I guess there is no concept in the _Colombian_ word as the
concept of _American Dream_ or _American Ideals_.  If there would be a word
it would be _anticolombiano_ as I've hear using _antiamericano_ for
_Unamerican_.  Note that _antiamericano_ is different than _antiyanqui_.
Any how, the prefix anti- have a meaning as something that opposes, not
simply something which is not, then _anticolombiano_ is something that
opposes being Colombian, something that is against the Colombian people.

-- Carlos Th