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Reformed Gweinic Case System 2.0
I have revised the Gweinic case system to reflect a more systematic form of
declensions and discovered the system of its predecessor. In general, velars
are associated with animate, labials with inanimate. The sequence
singular-dual-plural corresponds to the sequence voiceless stop-voiced
stop-homorganic nasal/nil, vowel sequence o-o-e, o-e-e,e-e-e, and a:-a-a.
Gweinic
Animate
                 Singular    Dual            Plural
Nominative       -k<h>e      -g<h>e          -m<syl>
Genitive         -kwos       -gos            -hes
Dative           -kwa:       -gwale          -wale
Locative         -pa:        -baw            -ma
Accusative       -hen        -men            -men
Instrumental     -pja:       -bjaw           -ma
Inanimate

                 Singular    Dual           Plural
Nominative       -lej        -ze:           -ze:
Genitive         -bwoz(1)    -boz           -mez
Dative           -bwo        -bwow          -mewn
Locative         -po         -bow            -me
Accusative       -to:r       -dor            -ner
Instrumental     -pjo        -bjow           -me
X-Nominatives
1. [pw] is a prohibited sequence.
Proto-Gweinic
Animate
                 Singular    Dual            Plural
Nominative       -k          -g              -me
Genitive         -kos        -gos            -hes
Dative           -kwa:       -gwale          -wale
(Locative/Instr  -pa:        -baw            -ma)
Accusative       -hen        -men            -men
Inanimate
                 Singular    Dual           Plural
Nominative       -le        -se:             -se:
Genitive         -pos       -bos             -mes
Dat/Loc.Inst     -po         -bow            -me
Accusative       -to:r       -dor            -ner
Early Lahabic
Animate
                 Singular    Dual            Plural
Nominative       -k<h>e      -a               -a
Genitive         -k<w>os     -gos             -es
Dative           -k<w>a:     -g<w>ale         -wale
Locative         -pa:        -baw             -ma
Accusative       -en         -men             -men
Inanimate

                 Singular    Dual           Plural
Nominative       -lej        -se:            -se:
Genitive         -b<w>os     -bos            -mes
Dative           -b<w>o      -b<w>ow         -mewn
Locative         -po         -bow            -me
Accusative       -to:r       -ner            -ner
Classical Lahabic
Animate
                 Singular    Dual            Plural
Nominative       -k<h>       -a,0             -a,0
Genitive         -k<w>os     -gos             -es
Dative           -k<w>a:     -g<h>le          -le
Locative         -pa:        -baw              -0
Accusative       -(e)n       -men             -men
Inanimate

                 Singular    Dual           Plural
Nominative       -le:        -ze:           -ze:
Genitive         -b<w>os     -bos           -mes
Dative           -b<h>       -b<w>u:        -mewn
Locative         -po         -bu:            -me
Accusative       -to:r       -dor           -ner
Tentative Observations
(I really did mean _discover_, not invent)
The original an(imate) stem was -k-, inan(imate) -p-. The zero grade in the
inan nom(inative) and the utilization of the labial and dental stops in the
inan declensional system suggests that animacy was the second category to
emerge and the original speakers felt inanimacy to be plural (the Air
People, the predecessors of the Ice People, were close to a group mind) On
the other hand, it is curious that NO
Gweinic ends in -p#. It would help if I knew whether the /l/ was pronounced
similar to /w/. Or the sequence [sle-se-se] could have become [le-se-se].
The sequence of voiceless stop-voiced stop-homorganic nasal is sufficient
for p-b-m or t-d-n. Apparently PGw lacked a velar nasal, and therfore
subsituted nil or m (perhaps because it was more common, but see also
Sumerian phonetics). -o/es is clearly a genitive of some kind. The h of an
gen pl(ural) hes and an acc(usative) s(in)g(ular) hen indicates possible
objects of an action. The -w- (possibly two types of -w-) is characteristic
of the dat(ive) case and the dual, and there seems to be much hesitation and
confusion over placement and the necessity of two -w-'s  for a du(al) dat.
-n- is characteristic of the an acc. The peculiar form an acc sg hen is
unexplained, although the dual and plural forms with -m- argue for a velar
pronunciaton ([x]?). -a: seems characteristic of the an dat, o-o-e of the
inan dat. The -le suffix of the an dat du/pl suggests a plural 'feeling' to
the inan. The loc(ative) and the inst(rumental) are apparently inan in
origin. The inan loc is the most primitive of the inan dat/loc/inst set and
may explain the association with the inan. The inan dat adds -w-, as might
expected, and the inan inst adds -j-, but the system is disturbed by the
rule [+glide]>0/[+nas]__.  Why the inan acc uses dental stops instead of
labial is not clear, but may be linked to the peculiarities of the inan nom
and the fact that the Gweinic language family has a preposition [do:r]
'concerning, concerned about', much used in official titles and names (after
the Interregnum caused by the invasion of the Hillmen, the new Lahabic king
took the name Doorlahabrakhe 'concerned about the island').
There is some sort of ablaut which I don't understand underlying the vowel
sequences.
Comments would be appreciated.


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