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>      15. Re: R:     Latin pronounciation
>            From: Padraic Brown <[log in to unmask]>
> >Padraic Brown wrote:
> >> but most Catholics will never hear one word
> >> of Latin in church.
> >
> >Interesting, irony of ironies.  My Lutheran church occasionally has
> >Latin songs.  Not very often, mind you, but on occasion.  In Christmas
> >we always have the "Angels we have heard on high" song, which contains
> >as the refrain "Gloooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooria [very long,
> >drawn-out] in excelsis deo"
>
>I didn't count _that_ sort of thing.
Tidbit: excelsus, the nominative singular form of excelsis (ablative
plural), is composed of ex + celsus. celsus is an adjectival form of caelum,
heaven, meaning 'those who are heavenly'. excelsus is one who has come out
of heaven. 'in' + ablative plural (excelsis) means 'among'. Thus the phrase
'Gloria (sit) in excelsis deo' means "(May there be) glory to God (who is)
among the excelsi, i.e., the heavenly beings who have descended from heaven
but now are back in heaven (because that is  where God resides)", rather
than the shorter "Glory to God in the highest".
<snip>
>Speaking of Greek, our church used to do the Kyrie in Greek - even
>long after Latin ceased to be heard. Unfortunately, even that's long
>been turned over to English. Perhaps 10 year or so.
The Episcopalian/Anglican tradition preserves the Kyrie and much more of the
Latin - including the Trisagion/Sanctus ("Holy, holy, holy, only thou art
holy - spot the Anglican here). For Greek go to a Greek Orthodox service,
for Latin an Anglo-Catholic parish. Quam verba et acta pulchrissima!
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