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Christophe wrote:

> > Mangiat wrote:
> >
> > > > it is such a pain to speak Latin I don't think any natural language
> > would
> > > > have as many endings as Latin.
> > >
> > > Cur? Latine loqui simplicissimum est; problema unum, vero, est:
> > grammatica
> > > morphologiaque optime studendae sunt... sed lexicon certe simplicius
> > est
> > > (hoc civi italico qui loquitur romandiam quemdam linguam, nescio vobis
> > > Anglophonis, sed linguae angliacae multa verba latina sunt, hodie
> > quoque).
> > >
> > > Veniam quaeso eis qui latine non loquontur.
> > >
> > > Luca
> >
>
> <puzzled look at myself> I understood everything! Yet it's been 6 years
since I
> stopped studying Latin! (and French studies of Latin are not the ones that
> stress on the actual understanding of the language, but more on the
ability to
> use a dictionary for translation and then to discuss the translated
text...)
>

Here it's obviously the same, but I don't bother too much remembering words
so similar to Italian... so I generally don't need a vocabulary to translate
into Latin. Classical Latin vocabulary is, on the other hand, sometimes
really hard, cause the same word can have thousands of meanings, and every
author uses it in a different acception. Medioeval Latin is very simple. My
copy of Dante's 'Divina Commedia' has many notes, by early editors of the
opera, obviously written in Latin which don't need translation.

Luca