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On Thu, Nov 02, 2000 at 03:34:07PM +0100, Kristian Jensen wrote:
> Actually, /IN/ is quite permissable in English, and I suspect in Nik's
> dialect as well. The thing is, /I/ is raised so that it resembles [i].
> Hence, the lack of the tense/lax contrast before /N/ that Roger pointed
> out. *BUT*... there is still a length contrast so that one can still
> phonologically speak of a contrast between /IN/ and /iN/.

I'd never thought about it before, but my idiolect only has [IN]. I can't
think of any minimal pair with contrasting [iN] and [IN].

By the way, does anyone on this list pronounce /IN/ as [{N]? I tend to
associate that with African American and Southern speech, but in any case I
find it interesting that it would be realized with [{].

--
Eric Christopherson / *Aiworegs Ghristobhorosyo