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On Sat, Nov 04, 2000 at 08:08:50PM -0500, Nik Taylor wrote:
> ---------------------- Information from the mail header -----------------------
> Sender:       Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>
> Poster:       Nik Taylor <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject:      Re: CONLANG Digest - 2 Nov 2000 to 3 Nov 2000 (#2000-301)
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Muke Tever wrote:
> > long, strong, wrong, and (obs.) mong
> > --> stronger /stSrANgr=/  "more strong"
> > --> wronger /rANr=/ "more wrong, one who wrongs"
> > --> longer /lANgr=/ "more long"
> > --> longer /lANr=/ "one who longs"
> > --> monger /mVNgr=/ "one who trafficks"
>
> The last of which now only exists in compounds, e.g., "warmonger",
> "fishmonger", "rumormonger".

I've never thought to use <mong> as a verb, but I think it's acceptable in
my idiolect to say <monger>, although I never do. Besides the oddity of the
pronounced /g/, to me another odd feature is that it has [AN] rather than
[ON] -- I pronounce words ending in <-ong> with [ON], I think without
exception.

--
Eric Christopherson / *Aiworegs Ghristobhorosyo