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On Mon, Nov 06, 2000 at 03:47:25PM +0100, Mangiat wrote:
> Kou wrote:
> > From: "Kristian Jensen"
> > > Douglas has it correct. But I'd like to add that there is also a
> > > terminological distinction between consonant sounds that occur when
> > > two identical consonant sounds are next to each other across a syllable
> > > boundary, and consonant sounds that are long but within the same
> syllable.
> > > The former is called a geminate, the latter is called a long or doubled
> > > consonant.

I also didn't know there was a distinction.

> > I didn't know this. Does this mean the Japanese and Italian examples are
> > long consonants and not geminates? Or does it mean that there are
> languages
> > (none of which I'm familiar with) where a hypothetical word like "ebb" is
> > genuinely pronounced /Ebb/?

Arabic has words such as /kull/ "all," but I don't know how the /ll/ is
pronounced phonetically. Anyone? :)

--
Eric Christopherson / *Aiworegs Ghristobhorosyo