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This seems to be a bit of a "red herring" question, to me.

Gevey uses vowel letter combinations when written with the latin
alphabet (ae, aa, ee, ie, oe, oo, ue, uu, ou, oi, au, ua), but these
represent distinct vowel sounds (broadly the vowels of southern
England English, because they are the sounds I know) and would never
be split into two syllables. Two vowel sounds never sit together
within a word, and when they meet at the end and beginning of
adjoining words then a "semivowel" (y, h, w) will be placed between
them.

(Adverbs formed from adjectives currently break this rule, but I am in
the process of reforming the rules for forming adverbs from
adjectives, so the problem will disappear - this is, for me, a bonus
of inventing languages).

I have to admit that the sound of Gevey has never been the driving
force behind its development - my main interest has always been
focussed on the development of the grammar. My loss, I expect...

Rik


> Let's look at this from an artlang point of view.
> Would you have the following pronounced as
> one or two syllable words in your languages?
> (As "Imaginary words," they are marked by *;
> please don't worry if some are actual words
> in some natlang.)

> If we opt for two syllables, we get such initial
> combos as the following:

> Initial [dj] in: *dieto, *dieno, *dialo etc.
> Initial [sj] in: *siesto, *sievo, *siamo etc.
> Initial [kj] in: *kiano, *kiepto, *kielo etc.
> Initial [vj] in: *viato, *vieno, *violo etc.
> Initial [gj] in: *giapo, *gieno, *giosto etc.
> Initial [bj] in: *bialo, *biento, *biesto etc.
> Initial [mj] in: *mielo, *miano, *mioso etc.
> Initial [fw] in: *fuoco, *fuano, *fuero etc.
> Initial [lw] in: *luano, *luego, *luiso etc.
> Initial [pw] in: *pueblo, *puepo, *puoso etc.
> Initial [gw] in: *guano, *guero, *guido etc.
> Initial [kw] in: *kualo, *kueno, *kuoto etc.
> Initial [dw] in: *dualo, *dueno, *duito etc.
> Initial [rw] in: *ruano, *ruino, *rueso etc.
>
> Would these be safer to define as three syllables?
> What differing effects would the results have in
> an artlang? Would it be easier to sing in one
> form or another? Would poetry be easier in
> one form or another?
>
> Combinations of -oa- -eo- etc. face the danger
> that English speakers insert a semivowel, making
> such things as -owa- and -eyo-. This is, to a
> degree, another issue.
>
> As I undersand it, Klingon has no sequences
> of vowel, so that solves that in the Klingon
> arena. But many artlangs have, especially the
> kinder and gentler ones.
>
> Best regards,                              LEO
>
>     Leo J. Moser
>

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