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Leo Moser niy

If we opt for two syllables, we get such initial
combos as the following:
Initial [dj] in: *dieto, *dieno, *dialo etc.
Initial [sj] in: *siesto, *sievo, *siamo etc.
Initial [kj] in: *kiano, *kiepto, *kielo etc.
Initial [vj] in: *viato, *vieno, *violo etc.
Initial [gj] in: *giapo, *gieno, *giosto etc.
Initial [bj] in: *bialo, *biento, *biesto etc.
Initial [mj] in: *mielo, *miano, *mioso etc.
Initial [fw] in: *fuoco, *fuano, *fuero etc.
Initial [lw] in: *luano, *luego, *luiso etc.
Initial [pw] in: *pueblo, *puepo, *puoso etc.
Initial [gw] in: *guano, *guero, *guido etc.
Initial [kw] in: *kualo, *kueno, *kuoto etc.
Initial [dw] in: *dualo, *dueno, *duito etc.
Initial [rw] in: *ruano, *ruino, *rueso etc.

Would these be safer to define as three syllables?
What differing effects would the results have in
an artlang? Would it be easier to sing in one
form or another? Would poetry be easier in
one form or another?

Sorry if I'm a little late in responding to this topic,
but I was visiting some friends in Boston. Anyway,
in Silindion they would definitely be pronounced as
three syllables, except for the fact that only combinations
of e and i + a, o, u occur. Furthermore I have noticed
that e and i become closed vowels rather than open
(i.e. /E/ > /e/ and /I/ > /i/). All this has a great affect on
poetry since it works with a system of syllabilic and
stress alterations.

 Elliott