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At 00:57 2000-12-29 +0100, Christophe Grandsire wrote:
>This time I won't bother you with verbal paradigms (unless you want to, I
>still
>have a lot to show, especially about 4th and 5th conjugations verbs :) ).

You might always recap for us who don't have a clue how you ended up with
one conjugation more than Latin has! 8^)>

>Finally, there are also the words douem /dwE~/ and douêne /dwEn/ (same
>origin as dom and dône, but with the addition of a diphtongation.
>Personnally I think they come from a different dialect of "Roumant" than
>the main dialect I'm describing, and they were borrowed in the main
>dialect with different meanings than their counterparts).

Maybe the long forms were formed from the accusatives DOMINUM and DOMINAM
while the short ones derive from the vocative singulars DOMINE and
DOMINA.  In Vulgar Latin the _i_ in -min- would be lost, giving DONNE,
which may have been shortened to DON exceptionally early, with the short
feminine back-formed from this shortened vocative masculine.

To this you may compare Italian _uomo_ with its irregular plural _uomini_.

In Rumiyaan the vocative singular HOMO has developed into the 2d person
pronoun _haam_, while the accusative HOMINEM > HOMNE > HONNE gave the noun
_haanj_ /hAndZ/.


/BP 8^)>
--
B.Philip Jonsson mailto:[log in to unmask] (delete X)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~__
                A h-ammen ledin i phith!                \ \
     __  ____ ____    _____________ ____ __   __ __     / /
     \ \/___ \\__ \  /___  _____/\ \\__ \\ \  \ \\ \   / /
     / /   / /  /  \    / /Melroch\ \_/ // /  / // /  / /
    / /___/ /_ / /\ \  / /Melarocco\_  // /__/ // /__/ /
   /_________//_/  \_\/ /Eowine__   / / \___/\_\\___/\_\
Gwaedhvenn Angelmiel\ \______/ /ah/ /_adar Merthol naun
~~~~~~~~~Cuinondil~~~\________/~~~\__/~~~Noolendur~~~~~~
|| Lenda lenda pellalenda pellatellenda cuivie aiya! ||
"A coincidence, as we say in Middle-Earth" (JRR Tolkien)