Print

Print


It doesn't mean "tasty".  It means "beautiful." Meiguo, beautiful country.
The Japanes use a different caracter and call us "rice country."  How's that
for irony!

Adam


>From: Steg Belsky <[log in to unmask]>
>Reply-To: Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>
>To: [log in to unmask]
>Subject: Re: [various] body parts, profile, etc
>Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2001 16:41:44 -0500
>
>On Thu, 22 Mar 2001 16:02:50 -0500 Yoon Ha Lee <[log in to unmask]>
>writes:
> > On Wed, 21 Mar 2001, Tommie L Powell wrote:
> > > "United States" is a pair of English words, and other languages
> > > substitute their own words for "united" and "states" when they
> > > translate "United States" (so, for example, Mexicans refer to
> > > the USA as the EUA).  But "America" is virtually the same in
> > > all languages.
>
> > Korea says "Migeuk" for Americans, meaning the U.S. (since Koreans
> > generally have a lot more experience of U.S. people--generally
> > military
> > folks--than other Americans).  I don't know where it comes from,
> > though I
> > used to.  But if you say "America" you'll probably be understood.
> >
> > YHL
>-
>
>It may come from the Chinese name, Mei\/ Guo/ (i can never remember the
>tone numbers).  I believe the _mei_ comes from the stressed syllable in
>"América".  It also happens to mean "tasty", and according to
>www.zhongwen.com , comes from overlaying the characters for "plump"
>"sheep" on top of eachother.  :-)
>
>Mmmm...
>
>
>-Stephen (Steg)
>  "don't you hate it when your character is smarter than you are?"

_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com