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Dan,

It's actually a McMaster project lead by Madelein Jeay. A crude HTML
prototype is available for viewing
http://www.humanities.mcmaster/ca/~jeay/hyplist/

The Hyperlistes project is focussed primiarily on terminlogical questions
and is not seeking to create a textual edition of every example in the
corpus. The Medieval French is already set out with line breaks (it's not
a diplomatic transcription). The Modern French is set out in the same
fashion. It is then possible to match "n" attributes with equal values
to align translation and original.

<div lang="13centuryFrench">
<lg>
<l n="1">,,,</l>
<l n="2">,,,</l>
<l n="3">,,,</l>
<l n="4">,,,</l>
</lg></div>

<div lang="ModernFrench">
<lg>
<l n="1">,,,</l>
<l n="2">,,,</l>
<l n="3">,,,</l>
<l n="4">,,,</l>
</lg></div>

Have you been in contact with Peter Robinson or Elizabeth Solopova or
Norman Blake of the Canterbury Tales Project? The Canterbury Tales Project
site has published an article by Norman Blake on the question of lineation
http://www.cta.dmu.ac.uk/projects/ctp/lineation.html



Francois