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J Matthew Pearson wrote:
>Steg Belsky wrote:
>
> > On Wed, 13 Jun 2001 17:06:00 +0200 Christophe Grandsire
> >
> > > How frequent are linguolabial sounds? And where are they spoken? I'm
> > > curious
> > > because they seem so difficult to pronounce to me!!! Your tongue has
> > > to go through the teeth barrier!!! :)))
> >
> > I have no idea how frequent they are, and the only language i know of
> > that uses them is i think Pablo Flores used them in a conlang of his a
> > while ago.
>
>Linguolabial sounds are extremely rare, but not at all hard to pronounce,
>IMO.  Just touch the tip of your tongue to your upper lip and release.  The
>result sounds like a bizarre cross between /p/ and /t/ (which,
>articulatorily speaking, it more-or-less is).  If you're having trouble
>pronouncing linguolabials because of the teeth, then you're probably not
>opening your mouth wide enough.
>
>Ladefoged and Maddieson ("The Sounds of the World's Languages", 1996)
>report the existence of linguolabials in a small group of languages spoken
>in Vanuatu.  Languages cited include Tangoa, Vao, and Umotina--none of
>which I have heard of.  No other languages are known to have these sounds.

"These sounds", that means they've got a who series? From what you say
above, I conlcude they've got a voiceless linguolabial stop - what are the
rest?

Also, how're these sounds denoted in orthography? Are there any IPA or
X-SAMPA conventions for representing them?

                                                Andreas
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