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    So, I was reading Vergil's Aeneid today and there was this phrase that
really struck me, for some reason.  It's in the middle of the seventh book:

"Behold!  From Hell's dark sisterhood am I, and War and Death are in my hand!"

    I instantly wanted to translate it into my dark language (which has OVS
word order, so that first sentence fits in quite nicely), Gwejdr, and this
was the result:

"vijenwej!  goS melinIDEs dZezEs gj&nvizIdZej ?ivijn v&n, ?A hu pseDEs
?ivInEs D&ks ?igweLdZ, hulASaTmeks!"

1. vijenwej: From the verb "vijenIS", which means to see without actively
doing looking.  "vijenwej" is
    the command form for the second person, official (depending on who you're
commanding is
    how its conjugated).
2. goS: means "from", "out of", "away from", "of".
3. melinIDEs: "melinI" is "sister", and adding /T/ (/D/ before a front vowel)
gives it a collective,
    qualitative abstract meaning, which is close to "sisterhood", or
"sisterness".
4. dZezEs: "dark", in the locative, as was the above word.
5. gj&nvizIdZej: (by the way, I'm using /&/ for the low, front vowel, just
below /E/)  This is the
    word for "Hell", though I haven't decided just what I'm going to have it
derive from.  I wanted
    the word from the beginning, but it didn't exist before this exercize, so
I've given it no formal
    attention.  It's in the genetive.
6. ?ivijn: "am".
7. v&n: "I".
8. ?A: "and" (used when conjoining phrases/sentences).
9. hu: "in" (it has other meanings other places, but "in" here).
10. pseDEs: "hand", locative.
11. ?ivInEs: "my", locative (it's not the genetive of "I", in this case; it's
an adjective formed from the
    word "I".  Both are acceptable; merely stylistic.  This text called more
for "my" than "of me").
12. D&ks: "are" (plural, neuter)
13. ?igweldZ: war, confrontation, strife
14. hulASaTmeks: "hulASaS" means "to die", and, via the same paradigm as
"sisterhood", "death" is
    formed.  The add-on "meks" is the name for the number two, and it's used
as the word "and"
    specifically when combining two nouns.

    So, that was my project/intrigue for the day.  :)  I rather like the way
it turned out.

-David