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On Sat, Jun 16, 2001 at 07:38:58AM -0400, Andreas Johansson wrote:
> PS I disagree about you're interpretation of the characters in "msgs" as
> meaning respectively /mE/ /sI/ /dZ/ and /(I)z/. I'd rather say that "msgs"
> refers to the SPELLING {messages}, or perhaps rather {message} + plural.

I'm inclined to disagree too, although of course it would be possible to
make such an interpretation, if there were other evidence to support it. To
me, <msg> is just a common abbreviation of the type often seen in the realm
of computers, where traditionally variable names and keywords and filenames
and such had to be kept short (and besides that, programmers don't like to
type out whole words anyway :) ) The same goes for <txt> (IMO), which has
been for over two decades a standard filename suffix for text files (In DOS
and CP/M at least, since they only allow filenames with up to 8 characters
plus a suffix of 0 to 3 characters; did Unix and other OSes without such
filename restrictions use .txt as well?)

--
Eric Christopherson | Rakko