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> Date:         Fri, 10 Aug 2001 06:20:09 -0500
> From: "Thomas R. Wier" <[log in to unmask]>
>
> Andreas Johansson wrote:
>
> > Icelandic also have /T/.
>
> I thought so, although I wasn't entirely sure about this.  There is a song
> on the album _Post_ by Björk where she can't get the English [T] right
> (she pronounces it more like a postalveolar voicless fricative IIRC), and so
> I'd wondered since that time where modern Icelandic has what English
> speakers use for [T].

Well, Danish /D/ isn't dental either, more a postalveolar (breathy-)
voiced fricative with no sibilant component. But since the IPA symbol
in that position is a sibilant, and there's no dental fricative
anyway, we just denote it by /D/. Perhaps close transcription could
use [Z_a_t].

And, the point: To my ears at least, the unvoiced version of that,
which would just be [S_a], I gues, is very similar to /S/ ---
certainly more so than Danish /D/ is to /Z/. Might that be what
happens in Icelandic too?

Lars Mathiesen (U of Copenhagen CS Dep) <[log in to unmask]> (Humour NOT marked)