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At 11:35 2001-08-07 -0400, Yoon Ha Lee wrote:

>I think in English they're
>confusing because the English-language-learner tends to want to break
>them down into their component parts, and they find it hard to tell
>if it really is something "straightforward" (e.g. to turn away [from
>someone]--and even that one's not as "straightforward" as I'd like,
>vs. to turn in [for the night]) or something that just has to be
>memorized, when it *looks* like a perfectly innocent verb and a
>perfectly innocent preposition.  In German I could recognize what had
>to be just memorized above and beyond the usual.  Perhaps that's just me.

No, the problem is exactly as you say.  I had the problem even though
Swedish has something very similar to English phrasal verbs -- although
here the particle is mostly more adverb-like than preposition like.



/BP 8^)>
--
B.Philip Jonsson mailto:[log in to unmask] (delete X)
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