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At 10:44 2001-08-08 +0200, Daniel Andreasson wrote:

 >I seem to remember reading something about this "brytning"
 >having exceptions, but I can't find the source. I think
 >u and o affect the e differently. CeCu should be CjuC and
 >CeCo -> CjoC. But I also recall something about phonetic
 >surroundings playing a part in this. (The word _jf_
 >'thief' comes to mind.)

Apparent exceptions would traditionally be ascribed to dialect mixture or
analogy, but given that changes spread across vocabulary one item/one
individual at a time there may arise real exceptions.

Not all jV clusters in Scandinavian languages arise from breaking.  Notably
the j/j found in words like jfr--thiufwer--tjuv arose from older *iu
and *eu diphthongs.

Breaking was always caused by *a or *u following in the next syllable after
*e.  Of these *e-a gave _ja_ or _j_ and *e-u gave _jo_ or _j_; the ja/j
and jo/j variation is dialect-dependent.

Consider the word _fjrr which shows the following inflection(!):

NOM.  fjrr  < *feruz
ACC.  fjr   < *feru
DAT.  firi   < *ferei
GEN.  fjarar < *ferr

 >Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

I know what breaking is, but I'm not sure what you are getting at.


/BP 8^)>
--
B.Philip Jonsson mailto:[log in to unmask] (delete X)
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