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At the risk of sounding psychological, can you locked down the one problem or
the biggest problem this task involves?

Contact lenses?
Water up the nose?
Sudden loss of vision?
Impact of water on the face?

When I was doing ditch and recoveries with scuba, the most important thing was
to get that air source established. After that, everything became simple, easy,
calm. There was time, there was the necessary resource, there was no need to
rush.

With mask recovery, you have that air supply already. So there is no need to
rush.

Back to the specific areas I mentioned. If you can id it down to one level then
mentally, perhaps (the way I do it), you can diffuse it and disarm it. Find out
what makes it tick and turn it off. Or, with contact lenses, figure out the
defense (keep the eyes close) and learn how to calmly do it in the dark.

GRANTED, black out conditions can be terrifying.....or exciting. I think my first one was a deep dive but the first one I was scared on was a bubble out in falls in shallows. But, there, I realized that I had plenty of air, time to work
out an answer. So I did.

My mask is a Scubapro purge valve, a rariety these days, an expense these days,
but I like it. It works with how I do things: I think and just do. (yes, I'm oneof those who can clear her ears just thinking the tubes open).

If, anything else, it can be a force of will. I remember when I was getting
ready to do a bail out and I was hesitant. A little voice inside of me asked
"Whatever happened to that woman who was ready to take the risk. To go para-
sailing as a volunenteer, not a dare, to go sky diving, rush at the chance
to rappeal. Whatever happened to your want to do?" And with that, I jumped
in.

-Traci