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Nik Taylor wrote:
>Yoon Ha Lee wrote:
> > I hear you, Nicole.  :-)  I've wondered where "Allemand" and "Germany"
> > come from--historical reasons, perhaps?  (Does the latter name come from
> > the Romans?
>
>In English, the term Dutch was originally used for the low German states
>(the word, of course, coming from a cognate of Deutsch), and German for
>the high German states, when Germany consisted of many sovereign
>nations.  When Germany united, the term Germany got stuck onto the new
>nation, and Dutch was restricted to the Netherlands.  The romans used
>the name Germanus for the Germanic peoples.  One of the tribes was
>called something that gave rise to ModGer Deutsch (I can't remember the
>exact form), another tribe was called the Allemani, hence Sp. Alemania,
>French Allemand, etc.

Actually, _Deutsch_ originally meant "popular" (it's related to Icelandic
_thjódh_ "people") and refered to the Germanic speech of the common people
as opposed to the Latin of the learned. IIRC, back in Carolingian times the
form was something like _teotisca_.

                                            Andreas

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